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Mate you are a tough subject, so multifaceted it's hard to know where to start.

 

I decided to give you 4 introductory questions, the we go for the Ten.

 

 

1. Bevan Colless. Briefly introduce your self, but leave out the sports background. Where were you born and raised? Education...and follow that up to where you are living now.

 

 

2. And then a brief professional CV.

 

3. And knowing as I already know, what's the management structure between you and Vanessa? How much of the physio is "hands on"? And how much is on the HR side, training and developing new employees?

 

4. Then Vanessa. I am only assuming she got here 4th Kona Q at Busso, so it's you and her both on board for 2015? Confirm that, and we can move straight to the Ten Q's.

Edited by kamalarrowsmith

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TEN QUESTIONS

 

1. So Bevan. Let's go now to a sports profile starting from school days. And follow that through to how you got into triathlon and why it's Ironman, rather than the shorter stuff.

 

2. Looking specifically at your age, and the cross country running, did you cross paths with a guy called McCormack? How about my mates, the Sanger boys? Anyone else?

 

3. So around 15 Ironmans over a 5 year period. As I know you range from around 9:30 up to 10 hours. Mention here one career highlight, and what is your current PB?

 

4. Mate. What's your definition of elite age group triathlete? Apply it across the board, and try to give some examples.

 

 

5. Bevan. Scan the above answers and summarise this one. Is is possible for a triathlete to move into elite A/G if they haven't been swimming or running at state or national level as a junior. Leave out biking, because there are so many top cyclists who couldn't swim or run.

 

 

6. Now as you also coach. Let's say you have an athlete like yourself. From my research and reading a few of your blogs, what I have is. Very good swimmer, probably in one of the lead packs, definitely not MOP. Gun cyclist, solid A Grade standard and well under 5 hrs/IM. Good runner, but it's your weakest leg. Now take this and apply it too an athlete you are coaching, make the athlete younger, and let's say he wants to trim significant time off. How would you approach that? (Hope it's correct)

 

7. So as you do coach. using the model of Trek 52, and MJK (Matt Koorey), they both vett and select with some consideration the athletes they choose to coach. Do you also apply this?

 

8. Mate you have been all over. Talk about your contact with Dan Empfield and Blaise Dubois. In both cases, was it worth the money?

 

9. What constitutes "old" in the sport of triathlon. Now clearly there are people who can go on winning their A.G. indefinitely. But at what age would you say improvement is likely to plateau?

 

10.OK, so hope everyone understands Ten Q's is played with a straight bat. So no focus on nutrition. But i do have a 2 part question.

 

A. Mate, high protein low carb has been around for quite a while, eg the South Beach Diet. While high fat low carb might have been around a while also, only recently has the scientific evidence come through to confirm what has been suspected. So given all that, assuming a person has gone HFLC. So if replacing calories during a big block of training. What diiference would it make if the athlete was replacing 5000 calories/day with high quality proteins, fats and oils, but the same person elects to use his last 1000-1500 calories of replacement on junk food? Eg, he tops up with coke, pizzas, ice cream and burgers (AS YOU DID AFTER BUSSO 2010, per your blog)

 

B. Paraphrasing, but not quoting you directly. You mention that the HFLC guys will outlive the high carb guys. It's probably true in theory, but is there evidence in on that?

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Have had a big day of travel from Busso to Tokyo, where I am now. Just pulled myself off snapchat and got a minute to get around to this. I feel privileged to be given the ten questions nod!

 

Mate you are a tough subject, so multifaceted it's hard to know where to start.

 

I decided to give you 4 introductory questions, the we go for the Ten.

 

 

1. Bevan Colless. Briefly introduce your self, but leave out the sports background. Where were you born and raised? Education...and follow that up to where you are living now.

 

Born and raised in Dundas, Sydney. which is in-between Eastwood and Parramatta in the Golden West. Youngest of 6 kids, my dad was a University lecturer in Psychology. I studied Sports Science straight from school and then did a Dip Ed, then had 2 years off to travel and make some money, and I'd always been attracted to Japan for some reason. I worked in the craziest bar in Tokyo'Gas Panic' for 18 months and also had other part time jobs, teaching English, coaching track and field and relief PE at a local international high school, working in a gym and I studied Japanese twice a week. Some days I'd work 4 jobs in a day as well as have a Japanese lesson. It was pretty exciting time and the bar scene was like living a mini rockstar lifestyle as the bartenders were kind of the entertainment in this bar and we'd get pretty loose. Some times it felt like I was a dancing girl, dancing for the man, as the boss would say - 'you dance'. Then I travelled the world with some mates for 6 months and went back to Aus and decided I didn't fancy being a teacher or personal trainer so I went and studied physio at Cumberland. Now I'm living 8 months of the year in Singapore, about 3 months in Niseko and 1 in Hawaii.

 

2. And then a brief professional CV.

 

I have had so many jobs. At school I worked as a strapper at Rosehill Racecourse for V P Sutherland - mucking out boxes and walking horses, worked in a newsagent. Delivered pizzas, personal trained, worked in a bottle-o, imported cars, and was an agent buying cars at the auctions in Tokyo, it's hard to remember them all. My parents had us all working from when we were 8 years old delivering pamphlets and making biscuits for the markets etc. Since graduating from physio, I worked in a private clinic in Coogee for a few years, then we made the move to set up our own clinic in Tokyo seeing mostly ex-pats. Then the skiing in Japan thing took off and I convinced the wife it'd be good idea for us (me) to set up a branch there to service them (was just an excuse to go and snowboard a lot). The first year it was just me in Niseko snowboarding all day with the phone on diversion to my mobile, running the clinic from the hill. They'd call and say 'I hurt my knee can I come at 11' And I'd be 'How about 4?' haha. Each year skiing in Japan got bigger and we added new locations in Hakuba and Nozawa and now Singapore too. There's about 30 staff now all together.

 

3. And knowing as I already know, what's the management structure between you and Vanessa? How much of the physio is "hands on"? And how much is on the HR side, training and developing new employees?

 

We still do hands on seeing patients every day, these days I only treat in Singapore and Niseko. With the ski field businesses every year I have to get about 20 new staff recruited,help with their travel and visas, get them trained ready to go every winter which is a big job and I pretty much do it all myself. We only open for about 3-4 months over winter then shut up shop. This year I've made training videos for the staff which should make it easier in the future but I've still got to interview them all and answer lots of dumb questions about Japan, find accom for them, negotiate pay and try to keep them all happy when they're here. Have had some troublemakers who've caused issues but many more gems.

 

4. Then Vanessa. I am only assuming she got here 4th Kona Q at Busso, so it's you and her both on board for 2015? Confirm that, and we can move straight to the Ten Q's.

 

No she didn't have a great day in Busso - got sick on the run which is unusual of her. But even on her best day she would have gone say 10.20 and KQ times in her AG were faster than that this year. She wanted a break from IM next year anyway. She'd been saying that for a while, we said we'd talk about it if she gets a slot, I think she was relieved. Bit disappointed with her day as she'd done a big swim camp, but still relieved as she prefers the HIM distance and I think she's better at it.

 

Edited by Niseko

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TEN QUESTIONS

 

1. So Bevan. Let's go now to a sports profile starting from school days. And follow that through to how you got into triathlon and why it's Ironman, rather than the shorter stuff.

 

In primary school I was a soccer player and then X country runner. I actually won Sportsman of the Year in Year 6 for coming top 5-10 in the State X country most years - I don't know why am an average runner now! Into high school and I was still a State top ten X country until 16 and then I worked a lot and went away from sports and just smoked pot and drank from 18-21. Then I in Japan played soccer and rugby again. I only got into tris doing the Phuket race for a lark after a soccer tournament there in 2005. I had done tris for 3 years before I did IM. I went to IM only when we decided to take a 'summer season' off from treating patients and stayed in Niseko for the green season. It is quiet there and perfect for training so decided we could put the hours in to do an IM, which was Vineman in California. Really cool race - I got 5th overall and even got my name on the roll call on Slowtwitch! They say problem gamblers always start with a big win. Ness' first IM was in Busso 2009 bloody miserable race that year in 40degree heat.

 

But I'm not an IM (or performance) snob. If you're out there having a go, I'll never look down on you no matter how slow or how short your race is. We're all got our own battles and obstacles to overcome and just doing it for a lark.

 

2. Looking specifically at your age, and the cross country running, did you cross paths with a guy called McCormack? How about my mates, the Sanger boys? Anyone else?

I was just a bit older than Macca, otherwise I would have. A guy called Robert Wunder was dominating the state X country in my day - he raced and won the father-son in City to Surf too (as my dad and I raced I saw him in he results). Often wonder what happened to him (pardon the pun). I was a late grower a little whippet and he was twice the size of me and muscly, I was intimidated by him, never met him just saw him at the races. Mind you my great mate Clinton Mackevicius (who lived in Japan for a while and now in HK and we still see each other regularly) did race against Macca at school, and often beat him too. But Clint is one of the best runners in Australia, he was at the AIS for 5 years and just missed the olympics by a whisker. He still holds the run course record in the Phuket tri - only person ever to go sub 40 and almost any triathlete who's anyone has done that race, including Crowie, Macca etc etc. He was just 6th overall and fastest Ager in Phuket last month, and one of the best blokes you'll ever meet. Not heard of the Sanger guys sorry.

 

 

3. So around 15 Ironmans over a 5 year period. As I know you range from around 9:30 up to 10 hours. Mention here one career highlight, and what is your current PB?

 

Career highly was my first Kona qualifying in Whistler. I'll never forget the last km on the run when I knew it was in the bag, I was choking up as I had had so much failure to that point and thought I'd never KQ and it had become a monkey on my back. To this day, I'm not a very consistent racer and have lots of bad days, for various reasons. Also winning a tri overall in Hokkaido (the 26th Hascup international triathlon!), the Vineman race and a few other AG successes in 70.3s and ODs - would have been nice to win the Bintan OD last year which is one of the bigger races in the Asian scene with 1,500 starters, but passed out with heat stroke while leading and 1km to go! i woke up 3 hours later in the med tent and spent 4 days in hospital with rhabdo! Current PBs are 2.05 for OD, 4.21 for HIM and 9.25 for full.

 

4. Mate. What's your definition of elite age group triathlete? Apply it across the board, and try to give some examples.

 

Hmm not sure about that. For IM I'd say swimming sub 56 on par course with wettie, biking say sub 4.50 on a flatish fair course like Busso and running say sub 3.20-5 on a flat course not too hot - (not sure I'll ever be able to do that). Put all those together on one day and you'll be very close to the front in most races and KQ almost every time.

 

5. Bevan. Scan the above answers and summarise this one. Is is possible for a triathlete to move into elite A/G if they haven't been swimming or running at state or national level as a junior. Leave out biking, because there are so many top cyclists who couldn't swim or run.

 

I think so for sure. There's lots of stories of guys coming into the sport later in life not having an elite athletic background and becoming an top Ager. ITU pro level swimming is different - which these days means unless your parents forced you to go to swim squad there's no chance, but aside from that with work I reckon most can get there if they really want it bad enough and have the right mind-set. Genetics play a part but 4 years, consistent year round smart training and most will be fast. But it helps if you have been some sort of a lifelong athlete. Probably not many could take up tis at 30 having never really been active at all and get to that 'elite AG' level.

 

6. Now as you also coach. Let's say you have an athlete like yourself. From my research and reading a few of your blogs, what I have is. Very good swimmer, probably in one of the lead packs, definitely not MOP. Gun cyclist, solid A Grade standard and well under 5 hrs/IM. Good runner, but it's your weakest leg. Now take this and apply it too an athlete you are coaching, make the athlete younger, and let's say he wants to trim significant time off. How would you approach that? (Hope it's correct)

 

Yeah fair assessment, I did the TA level 1 and have had several athletes over the years, but to be honest I copy a lot of stuff from Sutto and also from my coach Woody not just cut and paste, but the approach to training. I learnt more from them than from doing my level 1 - which was geared very much to coaching juniors who might win Australia a medal one day. I've got no secrets, just doing the consistent training day in day out. If anything the hill repeats am, endurance swim lunch, TT pm is a great day I always give if they can get it in or on 4 day blocks which I like to get my guys to do about 2-4 weeks out. And also double run days with a day off running either side. Helps prevent injuries and I recommend it to patients a lot too. Some mantras I have with my guys are: C.I.T - consistency in training and "Just Say No"... to missed training sessions. Am also a fan of short tapers and reverse periodisation. Before Cairns this year and Busso last year I was short of run fitness due to injury and poor season planning. And had an idea to run a marathon a week before. I actually asked Sutto what he thought as we've had some dealings with him about the japan race and he wrote back a funny email in about ten minutes saying something along the lines of go for it, I had some ITU guys run a marathon the week before a OD an they were on fiire" as long as I ran it slowly. So I jumped in the marathon in Singapore one week before (as luck would have it the two biggest marathons in Singapore Standard Charted and Night Maratthon were 7 days before both races) and I shuffled along to 4 hours and I ran some of my better IM runs in both races, about 3.35 which is about as good as I go.

 

7. So as you do coach. using the model of Trek 52, and MJK (Matt Koorey), they both vett and select with some consideration the athletes they choose to coach. Do you also apply this?

 

The coaching is only something I want to keep small. I have enough on my plate with the clinics and am not keen to do too much. I don't really vet people but if they are obsessed with numbers, heart rates and training logs and the like we're probably not going to be a good match, and there's a few in hindsight I should never have started with. But proud of what has become of Jess Ripper - first Ager in IM Japan this year, he had hardly raced a trip when we first started together. But he's more of a friend and the coaching just something I do for him for fun. He's going to nail Kona this year I reckon. but I'm not a real proper professional/career tri coach like MJK who is one of the best in the world these days I reckon. If TA had a clue, they'd hit him up.

 

8. Mate you have been all over. Talk about your contact with Dan Empfield and Blaise Dubois. In both cases, was it worth the money?

 

Yeah I did those two courses, (for those that don't know Blaise Dubois is a running injury expert - a bit of a barefoot bandit and Dan runs Slwotith and teaches bike fit) and both courses were worth it for me. If I was not a physio, then they probably would not have been. But I do about 3 bike fits a week, which is enough for me and see running injuries every day. Blaise is a legend, very easy to listen to and entertaining and a good teacher. Dan is very knowledgable and no doubting his methods, but he is, how shall I say, not the best teacher in the world. Gets a bit off track and goes on 30minute rambles that have nothing to do with bike fitting. Interesting set up out there on his ranch in the middle of nowhere in California staying in Monty's B n B. There's a bit of a movement with physios doing bike fit courses (also did one by Trish Wisbey Roth) and I know Parky here does fits too. We understand the anatomy and injury and people can often claim some on their health insurance. The bike mechanics are still a work in progress = ) - some of those new super bikes are impossible and have wrestled with many saddle rail clamps for too long = ).

 

9. What constitutes "old" in the sport of triathlon. Now clearly there are people who can go on winning their A.G. indefinitely. But at what age would you say improvement is likely to plateau?

 

It's great we can still be fast when we're old. I was done with soccer and rugby at about 35, I could tell when my team mates looked and saw it was me and decided not to pass me the ball, I'd think, mmm maybe this is it for me in this sport now. But in tris there are still 45 year olds killing it. Look at John Hill, Dave Boyes and Kevin Fergusson - all over 50 and still beat me most days. But still normally I'd say 42-5 is when you'll see a drop off with the same training as muscle mass reduces.

 

10.OK, so hope everyone understands Ten Q's is played with a straight bat. So no focus on nutrition. But i do have a 2 part question.

 

Haha am sure everyone is sick of me banging on about that and knows what I'm going to say anyway!

 

A. Mate, high protein low carb has been around for quite a while, eg the South Beach Diet. While high fat low carb might have been around a while also, only recently has the scientific evidence come through to confirm what has been suspected. So given all that, assuming a person has gone HFLC. So if replacing calories during a big block of training. What diiference would it make if the athlete was replacing 5000 calories/day with high quality proteins, fats and oils, but the same person elects to use his last 1000-1500 calories of replacement on junk food? Eg, he tops up with coke, pizzas, ice cream and burgers (AS YOU DID AFTER BUSSO 2010, per your blog)

 

Yes busted me there. My coach recommended carbo loading with sugar - as did/does Sutto. I don't agree with that anymore, but did what I was told then. Now I'd recommend avoiding the foods that will spike your insulin leading into the race during taper time. Improving your metabolic efficiency is teaching your body to burn fat so tapering and then loading with sugars/carbs just undoes some of that as it will spike your insulin/and switch off the fat burning. Having said that the training is much much more important than nutrition, hence pretty average eaters can still be elite.

 

B. Paraphrasing, but not quoting you directly. You mention that the HFLC guys will outlive the high carb guys. It's probably true in theory, but is there evidence in on that?

 

There is lots of evidence that high carb diets are bad for your health and high fat low carbs diets are healthier. But diet studies are hard to conduct and easy to pick loopholes in and ignore inconvenient ones. Having said that I've got a genetic blood condition (haemachromatosis - high iron) which means I'll be lucky to have a really long life, so I probably shouldn't worry so much! Hopefully I get to 80, healthy enough and active.

 

But for discussing diet, as I mentioned a few times, "Good Calories Bad Calories" and "Big Fat Surprise" should be mandatory pre-reading for people before they take a position because unless you've read at least one of those books your mind is still poisoned with all the false messages we've been brought up with. And they are both dripping with evidence.

Edited by Niseko

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BONUS QUESTIONS.

 

1. The Japanese are among the most enthusiastic sportsmen on the planet (agree?), but they don't always get the results commensurate with the effort they put in. However, in one sport in particular they exerted dominance, almost total world dominance, from 1960 to 1976.

 

An Olympic event male/female and the domination was on the male side.

 

In fact 2 athletes were so influential in this sport, one has a technique named after him. And the other one dominated his specialty so much that his Gold Medals were a near certainty.

 

What sport? Who were the 2 athletes?

 

2. Who is Glen Colless?

 

3. Mate, forgot this one. You recently rolled around Busso, well short of fitness (broken toe) and a level of commitment well below your normal high standard. OK, so you paid your money well in advance and 'Nessa was racing.

 

Mistake? Or something you just chalk up to experience.

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BONUS QUESTIONS.

 

1. The Japanese are among the most enthusiastic sportsmen on the planet (agree?), but they don't always get the results commensurate with the effort they put in. However, in one sport in particular they exerted dominance, almost total world dominance, from 1960 to 1976.

 

An Olympic event male/female and the domination was on the male side.

 

You got me there. Maybe Judo? My theory as to why they underperfom relative to their passion, money and training time is:

 

1. They don't dope

2. Can't think freely, work better under routine - they invented and perfected the factory line!

 

In fact 2 athletes were so influential in this sport, one has a technique named after him. And the other one dominated his specialty so much that his Gold Medals were a near certainty.

 

What sport? Who were the 2 athletes?

 

2. Who is Glen Colless?

 

He's a jockey in Brisbane I used to back all the time. Apparently we are all related to George Colless who nicked a roll of material in Birmingham and got shipped to Aus on the 2nd fleet and when busted made up the spelling to Collins and changed it to Colless - and that was the first with that spelling. He did well in Aus as a farmer in Penrith and sired 15 kids!

 

3. Mate, forgot this one. You recently rolled around Busso, well short of fitness (broken toe) and a level of commitment well below your normal high standard. OK, so you paid your money well in advance and 'Nessa was racing.

 

Mistake? Or something you just chalk up to experience.

 

Yeah I commented on what happened in the race day thread. I was being an idiot trying to relive my Gas Panic days dancing on the stage in the Phuket tri 2 weeks before Busso and fell off what was a pretty big stage and busted my shoulder and broke a toe. I did one swim after that and could hardly hold 1.50/100. And before the Phuket trip I'd been focusing on bike racing after already getting the slot so had not been swimming or running much at all. Through the whole run in IM Japan I was making deals to myself to suffer more and my reward would be I didn't have to race Busso. But then I thought it'd be nice to bike sub 4.40 once in my career so got sucked in. I ran out of juice at about 130km mark and just sat up and soft pedalled in. If I'd done a good bike I'd have ru to sort of validate it, but with a crap swim and bike did not fancy the run with a busted toe that I shouldn't have really been running on anyway so canned it. Had some fun cheering on with Carrotts and the stadium trip club.

But enough about me....... Nah then again, let's talk about me some more = )

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Thanks mate

Good reading, you certainly have lots of thing going on in your life , and even more in your brain :-)

Cheers

Ivp

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1. The Japanese are among the most enthusiastic sportsmen on the planet (agree?), but they don't always get the results commensurate with the effort they put in. However, in one sport in particular they exerted dominance, almost total world dominance, from 1960 to 1976.

An Olympic event male/female and the domination was on the male side.

You got me there. Maybe Judo? My theory as to why they underperfom relative to their passion, money and training time is:

1. They don't dope

2. Can't think freely, work better under routine - they invented and perfected the factory line!

 

explained the answer without giving it :)

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1. The Japanese are among the most enthusiastic sportsmen on the planet (agree?), but they don't always get the results commensurate with the effort they put in. However, in one sport in particular they exerted dominance, almost total world dominance, from 1960 to 1976.

 

 

Mens gymnastics. Multiple Olympic and World Championship Golds and domination over Russia, the only other viable competitor.

 

Tsukahara. Invented the twisting dismount, which is now called the "Tsukahara". And the other guy, perfected the handstand on the Roman Rings, it had been done before but this guy (I'm not a home, will post his name later), got it to the point of perfection, holding the incredibly difficult handstand without movement, then dropping down and immediately repeating the move and holding it for longer than anyone else ever did.

 

OK, Nakayama...and this move is sometimes called a "Double Nakayama".

 

Commentators will use this especially the "Tsukahara" because every gymnast uses that dismount or a variation thereof.

Edited by kamalarrowsmith
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It could have been motor cycle racing on the smaller bikes, 125/250, but that's not an Olympic sport. They did dominate in that era....

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