Jump to content
Charlesn

Tubular disc V non disc clincher

Recommended Posts

For those that have a disc wheel, and those that have chosen to shun the disc, what are the pros and cons of using one in an ironman

How much time value is placed on use of a disc?

What if it is very windy, best to leave the disc at home?

Do you need to practice on it, or is handling pretty much the same?

 

I have used Zipp 808 rear, but now have FFwd 65mm.

 

I have only ever used clinchers.

Flat tyres are my greatest fear, previously having had 5 flats in a single race, Challenge Wanaka.

What is the risk of a flatting with tubulars?

Would a bit of Pittstop generally have you back on your way without drama? Changing the tyre notoriously having driven grown men (of German origin) to tears

For the risk averse, would I be better sticking with clinchers?

 

I am looking at possible purchase of a 2012 Zipp 900 disc.

 

2nvz8lt.jpg

 

Rarely used, $900.

Next race is ironman Melbourne.

 

Should I do it, or forget it?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In my opinion the only reason NOT to use a disc is if you don't have one or the race is very hilly.

 

I found tubulars seem to puncture less, they are easy to change, and there is no residual issues once a tubular is changed.

 

Clinchers "seem" to puncture more often but are cheap and relatively easy to replace but can have post change issues if not done correctly

 

If you are worried about the tyre choice hunt down a clincher disc and have the best of both worlds (in some peoples opinion)

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I had a Zipp 900... regretted selling it many times. Excellent wheel and the sound alone will give you time!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If your tubbie is glued on TDF style then it's going to be a real pain to get it off. Tbh I just use double sided tape and it comes off no problem providing there's a gap somewhere on the wheel (opposite the valve) to start at and definitely quicker than changing a clincher. By replacing the tyre and tube at the same time you'd have to be pretty unlucky to have another puncture. Never tried pitstop but have seen numerous failures at the side of the road. Have used doc blue in the past and that seems to work but can end up blocking the valve core after a while if you're not careful.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have 808's and a HEd Stinger disc.

 

Used the disc in all races recently and have no issues with wind (I'm only 67kg).

 

I don't carry a spare tubular tyre with me, have some espresso foam under the seat with a spare tube for front clincher. If that doesn't fix it oh well.

 

I tend to enjoy the risk vs reward approach and question the benefits of some aero setups vs the amount of extra crap taped to top tubes etc.

 

That said, if i did more ironmans I might do the whole spare thing but touch wood only had one puncture in a race and that was a misfitted clincher that went bang and blew a hole in my tyre.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

Flat tyres are my greatest fear, previously having had 5 flats in a single race, Challenge Wanaka.

 

5!How many spare tubes do you normally carry??

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Cheers guys. Looks like the disc is favoured.

Especially in Melbourne ... Flat and smooth.

Will get my hands on the disc tonight, then consider it for a few more days

 

5!How many spare tubes do you normally carry??

Zed, 3.

But if you wait long enough, with a despondent look on your face. It would seem the on course mechanics do find you. They changed the 4th tyre, pumped it up, then drove the other way.

1 km later, kaboom, tyre blew!

Mentally, I've never been the same since

Edited by Charlesn
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

espondent look on your face. It would seem the on course mechanics do find you. They changed the 4th tyre, pumped it up, then drove the other way.

1 km later, kaboom, tyre blew!

Mentally, I've never been the same since

 

ha ha. That's unlucky. I've had one flat and that was as I was coming in to T2, just had to run an extra 50m. I'm guessing my good luck will run out at some stage... I really need to stop telling people about how I never get punctures....

Edited by zed

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

http://www.pushys.com.au/mr-tuffy-ultra-lite-tyre-liners-orange-700-x-20-25-27-x-1.html

 

If the road surface is going to be wet, I would recommend installing a tyre liner (link above). Fairly light and would probably stop any puncture you may get whilst riding on the main part of a road in a race as opposed to on the edge of the bitumen where all the crap is just waiting to puncture your tyre. On that point, I would recommend always riding on the road in a race where the left wheel of a car normally runs and not to the left of the white line on the edge of the road. You would be surprised how many keep as far left as possible in a race where all that crap is.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

Flat tyres are my greatest fear, previously having had 5 flats in a single race, Challenge Wanaka.

 

 

The multiple flat thing with clinchers has happened to almost all of us. It is often only one legitimate puncture followed by a series of cock-ups or the same issue recurring. ie. pinching the tube when putting it all back together or stabbing it with your tyre lever, or not removing the actual glass or nail or whatever or - the big one - rim tape issues!

Note that NONE of these recurring problems occur with a tubular - a different tyre is a different tyre and even if it takes longer or is more expensive you can be 99.99% sure that you are right to go whereas whenever I put a new tube in a clincher I always worry for a moment or two...

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

The multiple flat thing with clinchers has happened to almost all of us. It is often only one legitimate puncture followed by a series of cock-ups or the same issue recurring. ie. pinching the tube when putting it all back together or stabbing it with your tyre lever, or not removing the actual glass or nail or whatever or - the big one - rim tape issues!

Note that NONE of these recurring problems occur with a tubular - a different tyre is a different tyre and even if it takes longer or is more expensive you can be 99.99% sure that you are right to go whereas whenever I put a new tube in a clincher I always worry for a moment or two...

Well said. Except you will always be faster changing the flat with tubulars if its glued on the right way.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Good stuff guys, cheers.

I have my hands on the disc and it's a beautiful thing.

 

And if you decide against keeping it, I'll take it off your hands - as long as you are happy to get paid back over the course of summer (or I raid the SuperCrits Cashbox... :) )

You know where to find me - every Thursday :D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...

×
×
  • Create New...