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The Mental Health thread

Mental Health  

307 members have voted

  1. 1. Do you suffer from a mental illness?

    • Yes
      98
    • No
      172
    • Maybe - yet to see a doctor about it
      39
  2. 2. Do you know someone who suffers a mental illness

    • Yes
      250
    • No
      32
    • Don't know but suspect they do
      27


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With reference to FBs post above.

I've seen a couple of instances recently that make it hard for me to give when I see people asking. I was walking to work from the Queen St Mall, and this middle aged guy who looked homeless was asking people as they went past if they had money for food. I had no cash, but had just bought some fruit and bread rolls, so I offered him a banana and a bread roll. He took them, but asked if I was sure I had no cash so he could buy something extra. I turned as I waited to cross at the pedestrian lights, and saw him dropping the food I'd given him in the bin.

Yesterday, there was a guy doing the same at Ferny Grove station. I had nothing, but obviously some-one behind me did. I went from the station to the BWS to get a bottle of wine, and this guy nearly knocked me over he was in that much of a hurry to get in ther. He came out with a bottle of port.

 

It makes it hard to know when it really is the right time to help.

Edited by Ex-Hasbeen
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Many of the community recognise the Mental Health thread as a major positive on this site. To ensure this remains so please follow these guidelines for the use of this thread:

 

The primary purpose of this thread is to ensure anyone with mental health concerns, both diagnosed and "minor", to have an outlet to voice what they are feeling. It is also there for members to offer support from time to time for those that may be needing it.

 

Members have the choice to put their feelings down and get them out in an environment where they can share what they wish. They also have the choice, formally or not, to reach out for help from the community in general.

 

Anyone is able to respond to these posts if they feel it is appropriate to do so. Before you post though, please ensure that you are not "judging" the individual, or typing a post that can be perceived as such. Before you hit post, stop to think it the person feels enough to post their vulnerabilities that takes a lot of courage to do, are you helping them or making the situation worse? Remember many will put on a brave face and may not show really how bad things can be - even as anonymous posters on a forum.

 

If you are unable to do this, feel free to ignore the thread.

 

While the rest of the forums are fairly censorship free other than the guidelines already established, the moderating team will be strict on anyone that wishes to make judgements of individuals, or post items that can be perceived as being negative to those that have posted within this thread.

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FB - have you thought of making some small batch of healthy food stuff from your recipe book and selling at melbourne markets ? I know you are in tight supply of cash but if you can start small by borrowing some money it may be a goer ? Keeps you occupied as well.

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With reference to FBs post above.

I've seen a couple of instances recently that make it hard for me to give when I see people asking. I was walking to work from the Queen St Mall, and this middle aged guy who looked homeless was asking people as they went past if they had money for food. I had no cash, but had just bought some fruit and bread rolls, so I offered him a banana and a bread roll. He took them, but asked if I was sure I had no cash so he could buy something extra. I turned as I waited to cross at the pedestrian lights, and saw him dropping the food I'd given him in the bin.

Yesterday, there was a guy doing the same at Ferny Grove station. I had nothing, but obviously some-one behind me did. I went from the station to the BWS to get a bottle of wine, and this guy nearly knocked me over he was in that much of a hurry to get in ther. He came out with a bottle of port.

 

It makes it hard to know when it really is the right time to help.

 

There are also usually a couple of people who sit outside at post office square, with crappy signs saying they need money. At first i though they were busking, but there was no show.....

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Reminds me of something by I think Denis Leary years back about the above and not giving money to the homeless to waste on alcohol etc.

 

Ended up basically saying if he lived in a box he'd probably be wanting to get pissed or high too.

 

Whilst obviously said in jest I've had the same internal debate when I've given money to people on the street. I figure if someone's doing that well in life that they've resorted to the indignity of asking strangers for money, **** it, let them buy what they want. Can totally see the other view point though and if I saw someone ditch food in the bin I'd not be pleased.

 

More commonly, especially in winter, I'll buy coffee for some of the regulars around time. Don't know if they're legit but it's cold for me in my jacket let alone shooting in a door way.

 

Interesting how we (the collective term as humans) judge the worth of others and it's often a tough call morally and something I struggle with.

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One option may be to find the local homeless kitchen or shelter and give them the money or food donation, or even some of your time.

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Some of those guys in the CBD make more than I do

 

If you want to make a difference, give to a real charity

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I just want to make a positive shout to all the mental heath workers, and all of you out there (family,friends,etc) who are helping and supporting all those who are not mentally well for what ever reason, to help them get well again.Especially those unfortunately who do not have a lot of family or friends as a support network.Keep up the great work you are all doing, in what are often trying situations and environments.

 

Over the last 18 months my daughter has been diagnosed as bipolar(amongst a few other things), and so has my son more recently.

He spent 6 weeks in a lock down ward after a hypomanic episode brought on by his undiagnosed bipolar mixed with with synthetic drugs (LSD).

The situation could have turned out worse than it did, but thankfully it was nipped in the bud.Without the outpatient support and love and support of his family and friends, it could have turned out worse.

 

Having visited him nearly every day whilst inside,I initially was shocked at the state of some people in there in his section.

What saddened me more after talking to alot of them, was their lack of support they were faced with when they got out.

The hospital was there for them as an outpatient and for counselling, but a lot didn't have a good circle of family and friends as a support network for various reasons.

 

If you see someone who you think my be struggling with issues, lend them an ear and your time.

Even the smallest amount of support you lend could help someone through a dark patch.

 

Thanks.

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Geez Big Rig,

 

Not sure what to say but thinking of you and yours.

 

Good luck

Ayto

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Hi BR,

 

That's really tough mate. You don't wanna see your kids going through stuff like that! But clearly they are gonna have your support which is a big big plus. Bipolar can be managed quite well, though the more severe the condition the harder it will be. My father has severe cyclic bipolar (multiple episodes a day) and ocd which went undiagnosed until he ended up in jail (imprisoned, not a weekend lockup) and fluked on a great doctor during one of his hospitalisations. The doc is still his friend (and I mean friend, not just doctor) 20 years later, and has been invaluable to helping him as much as he could. Finding the right person, someone they are comfortable with, I think will help greatly. My dad saw lots of people with bipolar who would go off of meds when 'feeling ok', which often meant they were on an up and may have been feeling invincible. He also met many of them, who'd stayed on their meds and had only had one or two episodes in their life! So it can be managed.

 

And I know what you mean about visiting the hospital. Dad was committed into the PA psychiatric ward a few times, and visiting him there was a real eye opener. He wasn't in a good state, but many of the others there seemed so much worse! Some of the worst to me were the young girls, severe anorexics barely with the strength to walk around, permanently attached to drips. Some girls who should have been very beautiful with no self worth and barely alive. And I'll never forget the guy who'd tried to commit suicide in his garage, but forgot to fully gas up his car. Severely brain damaged, he spent his days walking in circles. I didn't 'know' I had issues at the time, but when I do feel it these days sometimes I just remember that place and you kind of tell yourself that things really aren't that bad for me.

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Hi BR,

 

That's really tough mate. You don't wanna see your kids going through stuff like that! But clearly they are gonna have your support which is a big big plus. Bipolar can be managed quite well, though the more severe the condition the harder it will be. My father has severe cyclic bipolar (multiple episodes a day) and ocd which went undiagnosed until he ended up in jail (imprisoned, not a weekend lockup) and fluked on a great doctor during one of his hospitalisations. The doc is still his friend (and I mean friend, not just doctor) 20 years later, and has been invaluable to helping him as much as he could. Finding the right person, someone they are comfortable with, I think will help greatly. My dad saw lots of people with bipolar who would go off of meds when 'feeling ok', which often meant they were on an up and may have been feeling invincible. He also met many of them, who'd stayed on their meds and had only had one or two episodes in their life! So it can be managed.

 

And I know what you mean about visiting the hospital. Dad was committed into the PA psychiatric ward a few times, and visiting him there was a real eye opener. He wasn't in a good state, but many of the others there seemed so much worse! Some of the worst to me were the young girls, severe anorexics barely with the strength to walk around, permanently attached to drips. Some girls who should have been very beautiful with no self worth and barely alive. And I'll never forget the guy who'd tried to commit suicide in his garage, but forgot to fully gas up his car. Severely brain damaged, he spent his days walking in circles. I didn't 'know' I had issues at the time, but when I do feel it these days sometimes I just remember that place and you kind of tell yourself that things really aren't that bad for me.

Cheers Goughy. I think in both cases they are manageable when on their medications.They are young adults who still live at home.My worry is when they move out, I wont be there for them on a daily basis to pick up on the signals. Guess you have to let go at some time.Our family has a history of mental health issues on my wife's side,and substance dependency on my family side (booze mostly), and I wonder if these types of conditions are familial? It would explain a lot.

I hope your Dad is okay these days? I suffer from OCD myself and have managed with it.I find triathlon training and exercise in general a great way to" calm my farm".Your right about psychatirc wards too.It is very sad to see human beings in such a state.Hence I really take my hat off to those mental health workers and the terrific job they do.

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I can certainly see your concern. While medicated, it does not mean they won't suffer some level of those highs and lows. And it is very easy when on a little high to feel ok and not need that stuff. Yet it's that stuff that's tempering the high to a manageable level. Then you'll get those who've had very few episodes, and none while on medication. And after years of it feel they can manage on their own. That's a lot like me, and while I'm now on very low dosages, I'm finally learning to accept that it is making a difference and I need to keep it up regardless of what I may think.

My dad unfortunately is destroyed by his, emotionally and physically. The toll it has taken because of years undiagnosed and the severity of his has left it too late for him.

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I can certainly see your concern. While medicated, it does not mean they won't suffer some level of those highs and lows. And it is very easy when on a little high to feel ok and not need that stuff. Yet it's that stuff that's tempering the high to a manageable level. Then you'll get those who've had very few episodes, and none while on medication. And after years of it feel they can manage on their own. That's a lot like me, and while I'm now on very low dosages, I'm finally learning to accept that it is making a difference and I need to keep it up regardless of what I may think.

My dad unfortunately is destroyed by his, emotionally and physically. The toll it has taken because of years undiagnosed and the severity of his has left it too late for him.

Stick with it if it works for you, and keeps you on an even keel.Sorry to hear about your Dad's outcome.Must be hard to see him that way.

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I don't want it to sound heartless, but we've known he could go at any time for over a decade now. His doc told him years ago that it was common for people suffering manic depression (what is now bipolar) to just have their heart give out. The constant up and downs, in particular with his cyclic, was like continually shooting adrenaline into their hearts and they would just give out. We've had 20 to prepare, and 10 of any time now. I actually feel like it's the bp keeping him going, not allowing him to surrender.

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I don't want it to sound heartless, but we've known he could go at any time for over a decade now. His doc told him years ago that it was common for people suffering manic depression (what is now bipolar) to just have their heart give out. The constant up and downs, in particular with his cyclic, was like continually shooting adrenaline into their hearts and they would just give out. We've had 20 to prepare, and 10 of any time now. I actually feel like it's the bp keeping him going, not allowing him to surrender.

Sorry to hear that Goughy.

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Some of those guys in the CBD make more than I do

 

If you want to make a difference, give to a real charity

 

When I worked in Australia (up until 2007), the company I worked for requested - but not obliged - all "white collar" staff to do 3-4 sessions a year helping out in a homeless men's Day Centre (Osman House) in North Melbourne, cooking, serving lunch and cleaning up. This was one of the most confronting, but pleasing, things I have ever done as it demonstrated that, no matter who you were, what you once earned, your background, your education, your health, your family .... you may just end up here.

 

I met a barrister I used to brief, a doctor who'd fallen on hard times using drugs, teachers, a former Melbourne Philharmonic Orchestra concert pianist, fathers with their sons, people who'd lived on the streets for 40, 50 years .... All walks of life and backgrounds. They didn't judge us and we didn't judge them.

 

The hardest thing was leaving the Centre as we knew we had (tangibly) so much more than these men, yet these were people for whom life's trappings didn't really matter. They had bigger fish to fry. Equally, we knew that, one bad turn and we could be in their situation. Something we couldn't really hide from ..... very sobering, indeed.

 

Now, back on topic....

 

I don't know many of you on this site (I may have raced with and against some of you back in the day), but the one thing I do know is that I've never read so much virtual support for people who've been doing it tough, than on this thread. Ayto's situation and the support received there made me well up a bit. There seems to be little, if any, judgment and a whole lot of positive energy.

 

Which, coming from someone who has suffered a few, major steps back in my life (job losses, redundancies, partner's leaving me, bankruptcy (twice) from the aforesaid partners leaving me etc etc), is great to know. Some words of wisdom, if I may: -

 

1. Life isn't easy - sounds trite, but it's true;

2. There isn't a roadmap for life - you make your own luck and gather support from your friends and colleagues Sometimes you need a little and sometimes you need a lot. Be prepared to help back for others when they need it and it will be returned in spades;

3. Triathlon can be a metaphor for how to deal with these things - it's a tough sport that requires a hang tough response;

4. The rewards for getting life - and triathlon - right are more than worth it. Keep plugging away;

5. Life - like triathlon - sometimes requires its participants to slow down and take stock of where you are and what you've got - you'll probably never be last. Shift it up or down and respond to the experience you're in. If you feel like you're "freewheeling", enjoy it for all it's worth; if you're on an "uphill grind", it will end eventually.

6. Importantly, talk to people you know and love about the situation. They may be able to offer little apart from support, but they may throw you a tidbit of information that turns your life around. The most important thing is that you share the load. They will, probably, come at something from an angle that you haven't seen or might be able to refer you to something you'd never consider (I changed career on the strength of a conversation with a mate the night of a redundancy which was the absolute low point of my life)....

and 7. Going for a swim, riding a bike or having a run - as long as you only think swim, bike or run - will clear the head and make you feel a whole lot better. Guaranteed.

 

It's not everything, but I hope that this helps you through the journey - or fills in 5 minutes while on a boring teleconference (generally when I read Trannies) and best of luck with whatever you may be dealing with .... I can read that the support is there.

 

Happy weekends, all,

 

Cam

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Well said Cam. Yes, any one of us can fall on tough times at any moment, and something that may not seem to be a big problem to one person may be devastating to someone else. Ultimately if any of us can help make someone else's life better through support, encouragement or just listening then that's got to be a good thing. Thanks.

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Just bumping this one.

 

Hope everyone out there is travelling ok.

 

I'm going well, despite some significant challenges at work presently however that will right itself soon hopefully. Getting to spend more time with the kids and they have settled into the routine well. The root cause of any issues appears to be anxieties from their mother as opposed to themselves so trying to work through that with the counselling I requested as part of the Court orders, however she has been dragging her heels around all of that.

 

Overall, kids are happy and healthy and that's my main concern.

 

Hope everyone has had a great start to the New Year

 

Cheers

Ayto

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Just bumping this one.

 

Hope everyone out there is travelling ok.

 

Hope everyone has had a great start to the New Year

 

 

 

you beat me to it dude....i had meant to yesterday after noticing it had gone a bit quiet....and was hoping everyone is ok....life will often have its ups and downs......

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Hope everyone out there is travelling ok.

 

Hey Ayto, yeah not travelling too badly at the moment. Finally someone gave me a go, and I am employed as a Program Coordinator, not a PM, but getting valuable experience. Also a contract, so at least I can bank some funds. Managed to get income support, but not for long.

 

This role is stressful and I will need to deal with it, but I think the stress of not working is much larger!

 

How is everyone else?

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Hey Ayto, yeah not travelling too badly at the moment. Finally someone gave me a go, and I am employed as a Program Coordinator, not a PM, but getting valuable experience. Also a contract, so at least I can bank some funds. Managed to get income support, but not for long.

 

This role is stressful and I will need to deal with it, but I think the stress of not working is much larger!

 

How is everyone else?

great to hear Jess. Remember all jobs have their good and bad points. Sometimes for growth we get with a great team. This could be a good stepping stone to somehitng greater, and don't forget, you will be in a good role to network and further add to your resume.

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Guys,

 

For anyone out there that has a wife with depression issues, who refuses to do anything wrt treating it, how have you managed to convince her she needs to?

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Guys,

 

For anyone out there that has a wife with depression issues, who refuses to do anything wrt treating it, how have you managed to convince her she needs to?

Lots of tact and lots of patience

 

A lot depends on exactly what condition you're dealing with though. If it involves 'episodes,' for God's sake wait until a calm moment when you can discuss it rationally

 

The most important thing is to set boundaries though, and stick to them. Turning a blind eye will just make you feel frustrated and make her feel enabled. You need her to understand the impact her behavior is having on you

 

Good luck

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Ex, that's a bit like I was. Refusing to do anything about it. Difference maybe was that I knew I had the problem, acknowledged it, just insisted on dealing with it myself. So my wife could bring it up without an argument. If she doesn't acknowledge it, then I'm not sure what the best way to approach her with it is. But I doubt waiting it out will make things better. Sometimes the hard love is necessary. Offer to go with her to some counseling.

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I started this post a number of times, and deleted, as I simply don't know what to say.

 

My mate, and wife's boss, had a motor vehicle accident at 1pm Monday afternoon, after witnesses saw him slump at the wheel. As it turns out, he has had a heart attack and collapsed at the wheel.

 

It took the medical team 7 hours to stabilise him to allow him to be flown to the Alfred and he suffered another heart attack on Tuesday evening. Bel and I have been driving down most nights this week to see him, and spend time with his family, as they try and get through this shit time.

 

Fast forward to today, and now I sit here waiting for the phone call to advise that life support has been turned off, as all testing is showing no brain function. The family have had to make decisions accordingly, and fortunately Steve was very clear about his wishes including organ donation, At least some good will come out of this crap situation.

 

Steve is 52, reasonably fit and healthy. In fact, at the time of the accident he was heading back to work having had a run and a swim on his lunch break. He was looking forward to entering and completing Challenge Shepparton in November.

 

I am incredibly proud of Bel as I know how close she and Steve are. They are more than workmates and she has been exceptionally strong helping everyone else this week, and I know his family especially appreciate it, as I do.

 

I am not an overly religious person, but if you find a moment please pray for Steve and his family. It would mean a lot to me.

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I started this post a number of times, and deleted, as I simply don't know what to say.

 

My mate, and wife's boss, had a motor vehicle accident at 1pm Monday afternoon, after witnesses saw him slump at the wheel. As it turns out, he has had a heart attack and collapsed at the wheel.

 

I've been quietly following this on Facebook but I didn't realise he was so young. Very tragic news for all involved, hope you and Bel are doing OK big fella.

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Unfortunately, following a week or so of uncertainty, Steve finally had his ventilator turned off late yesterday and passed quietly surrounded by his family.

 

The world is a sadder place today following his loss.

 

Following his wishes, donor arrangements were made as some good will come out of this, and he will be pleased to know that he was able to help others.

As I said in my post above, he was one of the good guys and had a way of drawing people in.

 

I will miss him.

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Ayto, I'm very sorry to hear this. It's a hard time all round and there's lots of grieving to be done. Keep talking about Steve and remember him fondly.

 

We were in a similar situation when master tortoise's godmother died of a cerebral aneurism when she was in her early 30s and 33 weeks pregnant. 23 years later there are still feelings of pain and loss, but it is softer with time, sort of a sometimes dull ache, not the raw gut churning hurt that you are probably feeling right now.

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Very sorry to hear that Ayto. Glad there is some tiny comfort to be found in him being an organ donor - some other families will have just received wonderful news.

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Sad news. Thoughts are with you guys.

 

Good to hear about the Organ Donor stuff - Apart from the obvious benefits to the recipients, hopefully his family and friends will also find some solace in this.

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Ayto, Thoughts are with you and Steves family and friends.

 

Sometimes i think this death thing is supposed to teach us something, but i dont know what the heck that is.

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Ayto

 

My thoughts are with you. The good guys often go far too early.

 

Consider yourself to be on of the lucky ones to have known this guy.

 

Remember the good times at his funeral like he would have wanted you to.

 

Making a donation of organs is the ultimate final gift.

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Thanks all for your messages.

 

Whilst I have a great sense of loss, I can only imagine what his family are going through and I am trying hard to support them as best I can.

 

Funeral scheduled for next Friday and the planning so far shows that it will indeed be a celebration of his life...........and that's exactly how it should be.

 

Thanks again

Edited by Ayto
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hi all,, just thought i would put out there a word of warning in the hope it may help others. I see a psychiatrist over the past 6 months, mainly as he came with a very high reputation and thought it could help me find the case of my depression and some anxiety. Very different to what i expected, He just sits there, says nothing and writes a cocktail of pills for me. This has happened every time. I always thought as per the movies, they lie you down on a couch and you talk about your childhood etc. Very far from the truth.

 

Anyway, one of the tablets he had gave me which i have been using for over 3 months ran out and when went to see him he said you should have a repeat, so i believed him and ii searched everywhere for the past 4 days and my last tablet of these was 5-6 days ago. it was an antidepressant which helps with sleep.

 

Well, i had been feeling absolutely disgusting over the past 4 days. Worrying about ridiculous things, no sleep, and generally feeling very uncomfortable in my own skin. Definitely no training.

 

It only occurred to me when i did a search on google how dangerous it is to stop these pills abruptly. I was not quite at the point of suicide but any lower and it would have been a possibility.

 

Monday was the worst, tuesday slightly better and today a little better again. It is something i never want to go through again. Hopefully i can go for a run today which always makes me feel good.

 

Although i sent him an email yesterday, telling him i didn't have a repeat of these tablets, he has not rang me as yet. I may not even now want to continue on these tablets anyway. I am on another antidepressant as well which he prescribed and still continue to take.

 

So my message is, never stop a tablet abruptly. it has a real bad effect. I am also thinking that i will want to give up with the doctors help, all medication. I think i want a clear head. That is why i don't like recreational drugs including alcohol. I figure every drug may lift you, but like any drug there is the 'down' which is not healthy.

 

Just thought i would share.

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Damn straight on that one!

 

In a way, my experience with psychiatrists wasn't that much different. Most of the time it was me sitting on the other side of a desk from them. I found if you want to really chat, learn say management techniques etc then you need to be seeing a psychologist in conjunction. Actually I'd see a psychologist first before moving up to including a psychiatrist. Key word being including.

 

Which reminds me, I need to get back on mine! After my first surgery, and this second one I just got lazy with them afterwards. Time to pull finger out.

Edited by goughy
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hi all,, just thought i would put out there a word of warning in the hope it may help others. I see a psychiatrist over the past 6 months, mainly as he came with a very high reputation and thought it could help me find the case of my depression and some anxiety. Very different to what i expected, He just sits there, says nothing and writes a cocktail of pills for me. This has happened every time. I always thought as per the movies, they lie you down on a couch and you talk about your childhood etc. Very far from the truth.

 

Anyway, one of the tablets he had gave me which i have been using for over 3 months ran out and when went to see him he said you should have a repeat, so i believed him and ii searched everywhere for the past 4 days and my last tablet of these was 5-6 days ago. it was an antidepressant which helps with sleep.

 

Well, i had been feeling absolutely disgusting over the past 4 days. Worrying about ridiculous things, no sleep, and generally feeling very uncomfortable in my own skin. Definitely no training.

 

It only occurred to me when i did a search on google how dangerous it is to stop these pills abruptly. I was not quite at the point of suicide but any lower and it would have been a possibility.

 

Monday was the worst, tuesday slightly better and today a little better again. It is something i never want to go through again. Hopefully i can go for a run today which always makes me feel good.

 

Although i sent him an email yesterday, telling him i didn't have a repeat of these tablets, he has not rang me as yet. I may not even now want to continue on these tablets anyway. I am on another antidepressant as well which he prescribed and still continue to take.

 

So my message is, never stop a tablet abruptly. it has a real bad effect. I am also thinking that i will want to give up with the doctors help, all medication. I think i want a clear head. That is why i don't like recreational drugs including alcohol. I figure every drug may lift you, but like any drug there is the 'down' which is not healthy.

 

Just thought i would share.

Yeah, psychiatrist will give you pills. Psychologist will help with the reasons behind a condition.

 

I stopped all my meds slowly over 6 months. Was a frustrating long process during which I felt wonky quite often. I felt really empowered by being med free for a while. Had a relapse of sorts a while ago, was in hospital for a couple of days. Out of hospital and back into life again now, I had to argue quite strongly with doctors about not going back on meds, I convinced them that exercise and mindfulness training will help, it is.

 

Drugs are good for some, but I seem to notice a recurring theme of guessing my condition with the docs I saw. Even the "best" docs were guessing. No problem though, they are doing their best. ☺

 

Stay mildly active and eat as well as possible, for me, self image and the like have massively good effects on my mind.

 

Take care everyone. Train smart.

 

samedw

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We just lost a long time friend to suicide. She has been struggling for years with depression after a very troubled childhood. She just finished a degree & was about to start her first full time job.

 

My wife & sister in law were left a suicide note to say sorry & thank them for all their help over the last 20 years. The pressure of starting a new job fear of failing, recent loss of her father and other issues became too much for her.

 

My wife has spent the last few nights looking at old photo's & crying. My wife & S.I.L were the first ones the mother called and arrived at the house while paramedics & police were still at the house.

 

Our 11 year old is struggling with the concept of suicide & why someone would want to take their own life.

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We just lost a long time friend to suicide.

 

Geez Dave, that's really terrible and sad news. Hugs for Terry and Emi. I know it's just words but let me know if I can do anything.

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Really sorry to read B.

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Hey Prince maybe a Psychologist or counselor may be of better assistance if drugs aren't your thing? And your Psychiatrist sounds like a Dick.

 

B@W best wishes for your family.

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Sorry to hear that B@W, that's terrible news. Luckily I've never lost a friend to suicide.

 

I don't know if it's normal but a few clients at work have passed away over the years and it does get to me.

 

Whilst there are many things I hate about work the client service is something I pride myself on and as all of our clients have injuries / diseases it means a lot to me being able to help them.

 

Recently I went out of my way to help an old Tasmanian client with asbestosis be able to access oxygen around the country upon arrival in each location for his last hokiday with his wife. It wasn't my areas responsibility but I was shocked at how little some colleagues in other locations cared and kinda took it upon myself to coordinate. Luckily I'm at the level that I can use my position for good.

 

Soon after his trip he passed away and I received a letter from his wife thanking me for everything and saying that they referred to me as "our Thomas". Made me cry when I read it as it was so touching and all I did was make some calls and press buttons on a computer. To think how much simple things can affect others is scary in a way as I have the delegation to really change lives for the better and worse.

 

It also me think how rewarding but equally hard it would be for nurses and drs working with loss on a regular basis.

 

Not sure if it doesn't get to me more than it should sometimes and there are cases where I feel maybe I should have done more to help. We're kpi focused and I don't feel like the Department understands or cares how much effort we put into our job. I think feeling undervalued by those in senior positions also increases whatever this annoying feeling is that I have right now.

 

Luckily I work with a couple of great people who are very like minded and I'd be lost without them. I do tell my wife but I think it's difficult to explain to people who don't do the same thing and I don't expect her to understand.

 

Anyway sorry for rambling just seemed the right place to post :)

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