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The Mental Health thread

Mental Health  

303 members have voted

  1. 1. Do you suffer from a mental illness?

    • Yes
      97
    • No
      169
    • Maybe - yet to see a doctor about it
      39
  2. 2. Do you know someone who suffers a mental illness

    • Yes
      247
    • No
      31
    • Don't know but suspect they do
      27


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I think many of you are incredibly brave to write your experiences on here.

 

I have another question. I know a few people (both family and friends) with depression/anxiety, and what I'd like to know is how do you know if someone's behaviour is related to their depression or if they're just in a *normal* bad mood or just having a *normal* shitty day? ie. how, as the other person/supporter/friend, do you know when to have empathy and when to ignore the situation as *normal*? At times I have felt that I've either needed to walk on eggshells or been tired of always playing the supporting role when sometimes you'd like support in return. I think I lost my best girlfriend from school to depression. It all became about her and what she could/couldn't handle at whatever given moment. It was tough being her friend. I'm sort of ashamed to say that after a while I just gave up.

Hey Turtle - that's a bit of a tough one. I think the "treatment" for their regular "depressed" behaviour and "having a shitty day" is the same - you just provide positivity ... or simple moral support. As someone said, they don't really have a "bad day here and there", it's just varying degrees. All of their behaviour is related to their depression in one way or another.

 

But it DOES get wearying/hard sometimes and you have to look after yourself first and the person you're supporting second. And sometimes this means you have to walk away from them - sometimes for a little while, sometimes forever. But ultimately - if you're not in a good place yourself, you can't provide the support they need.

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Dave - I admire your committment to your wife, I really do. The more I learn about you, the more and more respect I have for you.

Funny, I was thinking of you today and I will call you during the week... I just dont know what to say.

 

Hohum - you know my email... you know where I work, it you ever want a chat, drop in... I am mostly there.

 

Uber - you know.

 

I think the biggest thing I have learnt is that you want to have to help yourself. People try and understand, hell, even I have tried to understand other people and it is HARD. It is tough to see someone so low and not be able to do a darn thing about it. All you can do is be there in the background.

 

I am no expert. I dont know it all. I have suffered in the past. I have experienced the lowest of lows and it became quite a serious problem many years ago... but that doesnt mean that I understand other people entirely. Everyone is different, everyone copes differently, some people need to lean, some people dont. Some do and dont depending on what day it is.

 

This thread has caused many people to think and that is great. It has made me think and reflect. We are all people at the end of day each with our own struggles. Reaching out to one another is so important in life. Some people cannot do that with the closest people in their life, some people need to just write of forums (you have all been hearing about my life for ages)... however it is done it is a good thing that people are reaching out.

 

Keep reaching out...

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I just want to say I admire those who have the guts to post about their struggles. I moderate on another forum and have sections for depression etc and there is some pretty raw stuff there, but also some wonderful support.

 

Sites like BlackDog and Beyond Blue are a good resource for those suffering, or those supporting.

 

Wonder to what extent people who (have the good fortune?) to be naturally upbeat find exercise easy, or the reverse, to what extent if depressed excercise becomes particularly difficult or near impossible ...

 

Longshot, I tend to regard myself as one of those people - and while I don't find exercise easy, I have to push myself, I find the benefit feed my positive attitude. I do suffer badly with hormonal issues and since moving overseas and hitting a 'certain age :lol: the lows are very low to the point I am seeking couselling to verbalize and strategize what I am facing in life currently. Having an understanding and caring partner is half the battle won. When I don't exercise for a while and feel down, it's damn hard to get motivated, but a supportive partner makes so much difference.

 

I have learnt a lot lately from Chinese Medicine and it's philosophy - I am blessed to have inherited a strong 'essence' from my parents, hence I am energetic and enthusiastic. I have also done a course in qigong and find this helps balance and focus my qi enormously. It's not weird and mystical. It's main function to to clear 'blockages' of our qi or energy as a way of preventing disease - often cause by all the crap and stuff in our lives. And it's better than being on blood pressure medication too.

Edited by Foxy Lady

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I have put the link for the beyond blue website - fantastic resource. http://www.beyondblue.org.au/index.aspx?link_id=89.676

 

There is a distinct difference between a "sad day / sad period" and depression. There are distinct symptoms that will lead to an actual diagnosis. A majority of these symptoms need to have been evident for at least a two week period and include sub catagories of:

 

1. Depressed mood most of the day

2. Less interest or pleasure in all activities

3. Weight loss or gain (when not dieting)

4. Sleeping difficulties

5. Slowed or fastened movements

6. Tiredness or loss of energy

7. Feeling worthless

8. Difficulty concentrating

9. Thoughts of death

 

It is about watching out for others - whether that be your loved one's, family or friends or even work collegues.

 

Working in the disability sector, mental health diagnosis are common for a many clients (often in addition to other disabilities).

 

I too have suffered a short period of depression, in particular about 18 months after my accident. No one around me saw it, I kind of knew, but just didn't care for much of the going ons of the world at the time. I really believe by talking, learning and engaging our knowledge of our own experiences to others, it allows greater understanding.

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Wow. When I first discovered Transitions I thought it looked like a pretty cool forum. After reading this thread I now know it's a community of really special people.

 

Another bipoliac here with a family history - suffered through my teens but was only properly diagnosed five years ago at 21, after a bit of an 'incident' within an organisation I was a member of. Despite having to deal with destructive influences of other people who refused to acknowledge that it was real, I received good treatment including medication, cognitive behavioural therapy, supportive family and goals to strive for.

 

At 26 I've been pretty well managed and 'normal' for a few years now and with the skills I've developed I like to think I've beaten mental illness. Thats not to say I no longer have the clinical condition or that I won't get recurrences, but I'm confident (through lots of practice!) that I can correct my warped thinking in a way that prevents 'crappy mood' from spiralling into 'crappy mood for a month' or 'I feel like making some toast in the bath'. In any case, these days I maintain my mental health the same way I maintain my bike - regular TLC and fine tuning to ensure years of good service. Treating them both with new toys every now and then is also very important! :lol:

 

I don't want to rant too much on here (I'm really good at writing long-winded essays!) but I will say to those who experience the black dog that there is definitely an end to it and with time and persistence the fog clears. To those of you who (like me) often find your perfectionism creates unrealistic goals and disappointment; think of your goals more as milestones on a journey. Sport is meant to be a journey of self development and discovery - in the grand scheme of things results are just numbers. Don't sacrifice the journey or the development in pursuit of the numbers; Allow the journey to run its course and the numbers will come, and whats more there'll be no reason for disappointment when you've done your best. :lol:

 

PS. Another excellent website and forum is DepressioNet - www.depressionet.com.au

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To those of you who (like me) often find your perfectionism creates unrealistic goals and disappointment; think of your goals more as milestones on a journey.

I will add to this something a friend (who suffers from depression) said to me only yesterday. Like many of us type A/perfectionist people, she suffers from that needs to follow "rules" in order to maintain control of her life. ie I MUST go for a run every day, I MUST do this or that ... which means when you don't, it can derail things a bit.

Something her counsellor told her that I thought was really good and could be used by ANYONE was to have PRINCIPLES rather than rules guiding your everyday behaviour. When you compromise a PRINCIPLE as opposed to breaking a RULE - much easier to deal with and less likely to tip off a downward spiral.

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I am feeling quite anxious these days - hard to know whether the feeling is normal or part of a disorder? :lol:

 

 

I have another question. I know a few people (both family and friends) with depression/anxiety, and what I'd like to know is how do you know if someone's behaviour is related to their depression or if they're just in a *normal* bad mood or just having a *normal* shitty day? ie. how, as the other person/supporter/friend, do you know when to have empathy and when to ignore the situation as *normal*?

 

Wow. This thread is fantastic.

 

I work in mental health as a nurse and reading this is very inspiring that people are brave enough to open up about their past and current struggles with their mental health issues. Very corageous as well as inspiring! We need more public knowledge and education about mental illness so it is not a "tabu" topic that is too uncomfortable to talk about.

 

On the subject of what is "normal mood swings" compared to "depression" - the clinical answer is a lowered mood for a period of at least a few months for a diagnosis of depression. But I believe it is also individual.

If you are able to pick yourself up out of your low moods and are still able to enjoy the things you used to enjoy, then that would suggest you are experiencing the usual high and lows of life.

If your moods persist for a longer period of time and you lose interest in things that you used to enjoy, lose weight, lose motivation and just generally feel crap, then that would suggest there might be more of a problem that you would need to seek help for. Hope this helps...

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...the clinical answer is a lowered mood for a period of at least a few months for a diagnosis of depression.... But I believe it is also individual.

If you are able to pick yourself up out of your low moods and are still able to enjoy the things you used to enjoy, then that would suggest you are experiencing the usual high and lows of life....

 

Thanks Mel - I will refer to your expert diagnosis and consider myself "normal" :lol:

Edited by Pumpkin

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1 in 3 on this site :lol:

 

Maybe there is a link between triathlon and mental illness? :lol:

 

 

Sorry, don't mean to make light of it. I actually take anti-depressants myself.

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Dave - I admire your committment to your wife, I really do. The more I learn about you, the more and more respect I have for you.

Funny, I was thinking of you today and I will call you during the week... I just dont know what to say.

 

 

Try with something like this

 

"Dave ya tosser what ya been up to" It's the way most of my mates start a converstation when they call :lol:

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Maybe there is a link between triathlon and mental illness? :lol:

 

 

Sorry, don't mean to make light of it. I actually take anti-depressants myself.

maybe more of a link with those with the addicitve/ocd nature that spend far too much time browsing tri forums :D eg me :lol:

On a positive note, after some serious resting the last week or so im definitely feeling less anxious, unfortunately that has blown my BL chances out of the water, and at the same time created an alternative problem causing its own anxiety due to losing all fitness and eating crap food. Now hopefully when I start serious (half arsed training seems to have been part of the problem) training again as of tomorrow I can get back on top of Everything.

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Bord@work - It sounds like your wife is lucky to have you :D

 

 

Na I'm lucky to have her.

 

I still leave dirty clothes on the floor & never put away my clean clothes. Only just learnt to put the toilet seat back down :D I guess no matter how old you are or how long you have been together you can always strive to be a better man (or partner)

 

Next goal is to learn how to cook :D;) Apparently chicken wraps, toastie toasties, curry & BBQ get a bit boring after a while.

 

My biggest challenge at the moment is trying to support my wife as she aims to drop 25kg - man it's tuff need to choose my words very,very carefully :lol::lol: I'm now the one that's hiding lollies around the house :blink:;)

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Oh maaaan, you are WHIPPED! :D

 

 

I live in a house with three females (4 if you include the dog) - I'm lucky they haven't voted me off the island :lol::lol:

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Only just learnt to put the toilet seat back down

I know this is a thread hi-jack ... but I am a female, I live with my husband and father-in-law ... I never get angry when they leave the toilet set up, not even when it means I fall into the toilet in the middle of the night (no I don't turn the light on, I am an expert at going in my sleep :lol:). Guys have to put the toilet seat up when they go, so I am not sure why it's so hard for us chicks to put it down again!

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I know this is a thread hi-jack ... but I am a female, I live with my husband and father-in-law ... I never get angry when they leave the toilet set up, not even when it means I fall into the toilet in the middle of the night (no I don't turn the light on, I am an expert at going in my sleep :lol:). Guys have to put the toilet seat up when they go, so I am not sure why it's so hard for us chicks to put it down again!

 

 

 

 

what is worse? a guy who leaves the seat down and gets some pee on it with a bad aim or just leaves it up?

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Guest Turtle
I know this is a thread hi-jack ... but I am a female, I live with my husband and father-in-law ... I never get angry when they leave the toilet set up, not even when it means I fall into the toilet in the middle of the night (no I don't turn the light on, I am an expert at going in my sleep :lol: ). Guys have to put the toilet seat up when they go, so I am not sure why it's so hard for us chicks to put it down again!

 

 

No - we shouldn't be hijacking such an important thread but whilst we're there....sorry Swish, have to disagree on this one. It's also easy for chicks to open doors, walk on the road side etc. but for me it comes down to manners and chivalry and is a good indicator of someone's level of upbringing and their ability to think of others. Give me a gentleman any day.

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No - we shouldn't be hijacking such an important thread but whilst we're there....sorry Swish, have to disagree on this one. It's also easy for chicks to open doors, walk on the road side etc. but for me it comes down to manners and chivalry and is a good indicator of someone's level of upbringing and their ability to think of others. Give me a gentleman any day.

 

And this is why us guy's get so confused! :lol:

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Post cancer I struggle with moderate to severe anxiety. There is no cure.

 

I self medicate with really strong coffee (it's a desensitisation agent), red wine, tri training and hanging out with my friends. When this fails I can always turn on who ever happens to be the most annoying customer of the day. You know who you are...

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what is worse? a guy who leaves the seat down and gets some pee on it with a bad aim or just leaves it up?

what's worse is guys that miss the toilet altogether ...

 

back on topic now. Sorry for the hijack! I echo the sentiments of Tri Mel - I think it's wonderful that people have been so open and forthcoming about their experience with mental illness. We are definitely moving forward as a world with regard to this.

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Guest Turtle
I think many of you are incredibly brave to write your experiences on here.

 

I have another question. I know a few people (both family and friends) with depression/anxiety, and what I'd like to know is how do you know if someone's behaviour is related to their depression or if they're just in a *normal* bad mood or just having a *normal* shitty day? ie. how, as the other person/supporter/friend, do you know when to have empathy and when to ignore the situation as *normal*? At times I have felt that I've either needed to walk on eggshells or been tired of always playing the supporting role when sometimes you'd like support in return. I think I lost my best girlfriend from school to depression. It all became about her and what she could/couldn't handle at whatever given moment. It was tough being her friend. I'm sort of ashamed to say that after a while I just gave up.

 

 

Irony and tragedy. I can't believe I'm even writing this post after having written that above post only a number of days ago.

 

Yesterday I received a devastating phonecall to hear that this girlfriend just took her own life. Tall, blonde, blue-eyed, 36, dux of our school, a doctor, married to an Olympian and with two beautiful blonde littlies under the age of 3. It all sounds picture perfect and yet, for years and years she has struggled with depression and an eating disorder. It obviously just became too much.

 

In a way, I can't believe I wrote that post and still then, didn't take it as a cue to call. I gave up a while back because I lack the understanding and knowledge of how to deal with others in that situation. I am so fortunate to not know those depths of despair but that is no excuse not to at least lob the occasional "hello" into an inbox or go for coffee, whatever. I will live with that shame/regret for the rest of my life. I should never have given up on someone - especially a best buddy.

 

I guess what I want to say is:

Hug your loved ones tight and TELL them you love them. Don't assume they feel it and don't let them assume they're loved.

Forgive your foes. Who knows what they're going through.

Never hide behind work or triathlon or some other activity if you're crumbling inside, just for the sake of scrambling for some normality.

and Never EVER walk alone with the black dog. There is always someone who would willingly walk with you.

 

..may she finally have found her peace...

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Irony and tragedy. I can't believe I'm even writing this post after having written that above post only a number of days ago.

 

Yesterday I received a devastating phonecall to hear that this girlfriend just took her own life. Tall, blonde, blue-eyed, 36, dux of our school, a doctor, married to an Olympian and with two beautiful blonde littlies under the age of 3. It all sounds picture perfect and yet, for years and years she has struggled with depression and an eating disorder. It obviously just became too much.

 

In a way, I can't believe I wrote that post and still then, didn't take it as a cue to call. I gave up a while back because I lack the understanding and knowledge of how to deal with others in that situation. I am so fortunate to not know those depths of despair but that is no excuse not to at least lob the occasional "hello" into an inbox or go for coffee, whatever. I will live with that shame/regret for the rest of my life. I should never have given up on someone - especially a best buddy.

 

I guess what I want to say is:

Hug your loved ones tight and TELL them you love them. Don't assume they feel it and don't let them assume they're loved.

Forgive your foes. Who knows what they're going through.

Never hide behind work or triathlon or some other activity if you're crumbling inside, just for the sake of scrambling for some normality.

and Never EVER walk alone with the black dog. There is always someone who would willingly walk with you.

 

..may she finally have found her peace...

Turtle - one of the first things you learn when you receive counselling as a "support" person for someone with mental illness is ... you are not responsible for their happiness and you are not responsible for their actions. And you have to look after yourself first and foremost before you can provide good support for them.

 

It is such a tragedy that your friend took her life :lol:

 

But ultimately - your actions/inaction were NOT responsible. Do not take ownership for her actions, simply grieve for your friend that her illness was so overwhelming that all the love she obviously had in her life could not overcome it.

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I'm writting this and hoping those that have some form of thinking illness, note thinking illness - not always the same as mental illness. I think as triathletes we let ourselves be taken over by thought process and this is seperate to who we really are (ie) the real you and the fake one -the thinking ego that does so much damage and causes so many cases of anxiety and depression. You can believe me when I tell you that if you get a grip on what anxiety and depression really are they tend to lose a lot of their power over you.

 

I'm not a yogi swami or even particularly religieous but anyone with these problems I urge you to read a book from a man by the name of Eckhart Tolle, called a New Earh, Awakening your life's purpose. It gives an incredible insight into what is causing all these problems at the moment and what you can do to straighten yourself out, it is an epidemic and a change must come - read this book, it will blow your doors off.

 

Best,

 

Jeff.

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Well I have been a lurker here for a while and have basically ignored this topic for reasons that will come out further. The reason I read the topic today was I am using it as avoidance to do something else, vacuuming floors.

 

I am a returned serviceman, Vietnam 69 - 70, so I am old fart. When I came home I busied myself in everything. Overtime, two jobs, committees, you name it I joined it. I was hardly home and when I was I was always busy somewhere. I didn;t know why until many years later.

 

I would go into a rage for no real reason. It could have the TV being too loud or someone speaking to me at the wrong time. I should also point out here that I am an alcoholic. Although I gave up drinking nearly 20 years ago I still count myself an one. After blowing up I would go to the RSL, and they would validate my behaviour.

 

Sometimes I would take the car and go for a drive, this was not alway's a good thing as I then took it out on other road users. I don't know how I haven't been jailed for some of the things I have done.

 

About 8 years ago I blew up at home again. Only this time the car wasn't home so I took my bike and went for a ride. It was the fastest ride I had ever done and I ended up in Southbank. I sat down and looked at the people around me and questioned myself as to why couldn't I be "normal" like them.

 

I then rode after a few hours and walked into the house, saw my wife in bed crying. I gave her a hug, which she didn't want then, and said to her," This is my problem, not anyone elses, and I need to get help." She kissed me and said that was the nicest thing I had ever said to her. I later found out that her friends and family were telling her to leave me as I was a mental case, but she stood by me. Wonderful lady. This is my second marriage. The first one ended after I she had had enough of my behaviour.

 

I then went to the Vietnam Veterans Counselling Service and got some help.

 

Fast forward to 12 months ago. I had to attend a counseling session with my wife as part of her trying to understand PTSD. The counsellor took one look at me and questioned whether I was ok. Said I was and she kept at it. In the end I went into a rage and was restrained by security, and had the ambulance take me to hospital. The counselor thought I was suicidle. I was going to take my life that day and I couldn't give a damn.

 

I was seen by the CAT team in hospital and transferred to Ward 17 at Heidelberg repat. This is a mental facility for service men and women and emergency services.

 

I spent 6 weeks in there being counselled, supervised etc. I was on suicide watch for 3 weeks. You are a voluntary patient so you can come and go. I stayed because I felt safe there.

 

I am still seeing a psychiatrist, an occupational therapist (getting me to function in a positive way with day to day things like hygiene and nutrition), my GP and a psychologist.

 

One day I rode my bike to see the psychiatrist and he was blown away. He wanted to know why I rode and all things about it. He told me that if more people excised they would be able to manage their PTSD better.

 

Yes I have PTSD, and have had it for 40 years, I recognised there was something wrong with me after 32 years and one marriage. I will have it for the rest of my life. All I want to do is manage it and have the ups and downs a lot shallower.

 

As for making goals, forget it.

 

Sorry about the long post.

 

Stein

 

"Reclaiming my Life"

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Well I have been a lurker here for a while and have basically ignored this topic for reasons that will come out further. The reason I read the topic today was I am using it as avoidance to do something else, vacuuming floors.

 

I am a returned serviceman, Vietnam 69 - 70, so I am old fart. When I came home I busied myself in everything. Overtime, two jobs, committees, you name it I joined it. I was hardly home and when I was I was always busy somewhere. I didn;t know why until many years later.

 

I would go into a rage for no real reason. It could have the TV being too loud or someone speaking to me at the wrong time. I should also point out here that I am an alcoholic. Although I gave up drinking nearly 20 years ago I still count myself an one. After blowing up I would go to the RSL, and they would validate my behaviour.

 

Sometimes I would take the car and go for a drive, this was not alway's a good thing as I then took it out on other road users. I don't know how I haven't been jailed for some of the things I have done.

 

About 8 years ago I blew up at home again. Only this time the car wasn't home so I took my bike and went for a ride. It was the fastest ride I had ever done and I ended up in Southbank. I sat down and looked at the people around me and questioned myself as to why couldn't I be "normal" like them.

 

I then rode after a few hours and walked into the house, saw my wife in bed crying. I gave her a hug, which she didn't want then, and said to her," This is my problem, not anyone elses, and I need to get help." She kissed me and said that was the nicest thing I had ever said to her. I later found out that her friends and family were telling her to leave me as I was a mental case, but she stood by me. Wonderful lady. This is my second marriage. The first one ended after I she had had enough of my behaviour.

 

I then went to the Vietnam Veterans Counselling Service and got some help.

 

Fast forward to 12 months ago. I had to attend a counseling session with my wife as part of her trying to understand PTSD. The counsellor took one look at me and questioned whether I was ok. Said I was and she kept at it. In the end I went into a rage and was restrained by security, and had the ambulance take me to hospital. The counselor thought I was suicidle. I was going to take my life that day and I couldn't give a damn.

 

I was seen by the CAT team in hospital and transferred to Ward 17 at Heidelberg repat. This is a mental facility for service men and women and emergency services.

 

I spent 6 weeks in there being counselled, supervised etc. I was on suicide watch for 3 weeks. You are a voluntary patient so you can come and go. I stayed because I felt safe there.

 

I am still seeing a psychiatrist, an occupational therapist (getting me to function in a positive way with day to day things like hygiene and nutrition), my GP and a psychologist.

 

One day I rode my bike to see the psychiatrist and he was blown away. He wanted to know why I rode and all things about it. He told me that if more people excised they would be able to manage their PTSD better.

 

Yes I have PTSD, and have had it for 40 years, I recognised there was something wrong with me after 32 years and one marriage. I will have it for the rest of my life. All I want to do is manage it and have the ups and downs a lot shallower.

 

As for making goals, forget it.

 

Sorry about the long post.

 

Stein

 

"Reclaiming my Life"

 

Complete respect Stein. Keep up the fight. I understand the PTSD, keep fighting, recognising it for what it is really helps.

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Stein

 

"Reclaiming my Life"

 

Respect.

 

Obviously there are things you aren't proud of but sticking with it and learning from it are.

 

All the best.

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........

Yes I have PTSD, and have had it for 40 years, I recognised there was something wrong with me after 32 years and one marriage. I will have it for the rest of my life. All I want to do is manage it and have the ups and downs a lot shallower.

 

As for making goals, forget it.

 

Sorry about the long post.

 

Stein

 

"Reclaiming my Life"

 

epic goodluck with everything.

I dont know anyone with a mental illness (that i know of)

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This thread has been a real eyeopener for me. Havent really been exposed to this sort of stuff much,, that I know of.

 

I hope that sharing this with others which initself is incredibly brave is also somewhat cathartic.

 

I wish you all the best with your journeys, and thanks for the eductaion.

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I urge you to read a book from a man by the name of Eckhart Tolle, called a New Earth, Awakening your life's purpose.

bought it today, thanks

 

and thanks for the eductaion.

didnt get much of one at school :lol::lol:

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Guest justsam

I know this is an old thread but two days ago I hit "rock bottom" and I need to share.

 

I am a perfectionist. Pure and simple and in my never ending search for "perfection" I nearly suceeded in taking my own life. I couldn't stand the fact that some people just did things for fun, and not to be "the best". I came home from work and tried to take my own life, only escaping because something deep in the back of my mind wanted to live. I sat on the floor and just screamed, I was at the end of my rope. About 30mins later I emailed my newly pregnant wife to come home from work. She then took me to hospital where I was refered to the Mental Health Unit. I have stayed in the unit before and it scares me. People like me in the same ward as unfortunate souls walking on tip toes and making pigeon noises, bloody scary. 48 hrs later and heaps of phone calls from friends and family I still feel "fragile", yet relaxed.

 

I am lucky enough to have a caring understanding boss who gave me a few days grace as far as work goes and great friends who I am meeting for coffee.

 

After seeing first hand the state of the community mental health clinic up here I feel compelled to organise a charity ride of some nature to raise funds for it. The phones are old, coffee cups chipped and the place could do with a lick of paint, and the carpet...well that was just filthy. The people who NEED these services and cant function without them deserve better.

Any knowledge of organising such events would be appreciated. I have two close friends near by with experience but all help would be great.

 

Thanks again for Transitions and the community it encourages.

 

Cheers sam..

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Bllody hell mate, dont know what to say.

Good luck with your battle.

Feel free to vent here if needed.

 

Glad you made it through.

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Guest justsam
Bllody hell mate, dont know what to say.

Good luck with your battle.

Feel free to vent here if needed.

 

Glad you made it through.

 

 

Thanks guys :lol:

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You know, on this site we can all act like tools, be flippant, insulting and sometimes funny. But there's a core here that you know you can rely on.

 

So anytime you feel the horrors coming on, just get on here and vent. There's always someone here to listen.

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After seeing first hand the state of the community mental health clinic up here I feel compelled to organise a charity ride of some nature to raise funds for it. The phones are old, coffee cups chipped and the place could do with a lick of paint, and the carpet...well that was just filthy. The people who NEED these services and cant function without them deserve better.

Any knowledge of organising such events would be appreciated. I have two close friends near by with experience but all help would be great.

 

Thanks again for Transitions and the community it encourages.

 

Cheers sam..

 

Good to see that you have some understanding friends around.

 

Why is it acceptble to have the Mental Health wards so underfunded? We wouldn't let it happen to the respitory or othopeodic wards! And it's also a shame that all mental health conditions get lumped together. A lot of the different disorders can actually be counter productive being together.

 

Good luck!

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Have a new respect myself for this thread/topic lately, theres no need to go into details as I think I have done the talking I need to do for now.

 

Thanks again for Transitions and the community it encourages.

that sums it up, the support I have received from a few members from here, one in particular, has helped far more than they realise.

 

Much respect to you justsam and goodluck with your fundraising.

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Oh Sam - thank G you're still with us and you're very brave to come on here.

 

Take comfort in the knowledge that you're not alone and that there are friends and family of yours who want you desperately and a community on here ready to help.

 

I hope I can be of help in my own little way. I have gained a spot in the NY marathon and, as a result of having a dear friend take her life a couple of months ago to depression, and having witness other close friends suffer terribly, I would like to run the race and raise money for Beyond Blue. 50c or $5000, I don't mind. I just want to give something to those who often suffer in silence and are often misunderstood.

 

Good luck with your fundraising. Perhaps it'll give you a fresh purpose and strength to get through.

 

All the best,

turtle

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Take comfort in the knowledge that you're not alone and that there are friends and family of yours who want you desperately and a community on here ready to help.

 

:lol:

 

More than you will ever know...................... :lol:

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Mental Health 1- you externalise your feelings. Hit people, things etc.

 

Mental Health 2- you internalise your feelings. Depression, self harm etc.

 

Mental Health 3- you do both!

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Pardon my ignorance uber but can you pls send me a link to AT if poss? or direct me to where I can find it?

 

I'm currently organising some fundraising for The Black Dog Institute so any extra info etc. would be great.

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Hi all! It has been with great sadness and empathy that I have read this thread. I have a very keen interest in this area and on September 21st, I am heading off on my bike with a group of teenagers (and other staff) to ride from Hervey Bay to Brisbane. We will arrive in Brisbane on Friday 25th and have invited Anna Bligh to meet us. We want to deliver a letter to her about the lack of mental health care services for young adults in regional Queensland.

 

Our ride is called "One Step at a Time" and is about staff and students standing together. We are a team of 16 including our support crew. Our very own BigKev has been coaching the kids. They are so excited - I am more than a little nervous!

 

Depression and anxiety are a huge problem in our modern society! Although we are improving our attitudes to it, there is still a stigma attached to"mental health". It is up to each and every one of us to agitate for change and to be open and accepting. I think that those people who have talked about their experiences are fantastic and brave and strong! Your willingness to talk about your experiences give others courage to seek help!

 

:lol:

 

Lisa

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Like others I've purposely stayed away from this thread. But after reading it I have to say all the best to everyone going through any kind of mental illness.

 

Without making this too long a post (and many have heard it before in some shape or form...), but my Brother Wayne took his life after struggling with drug related mental illness for about 20 years. The last five years of his life he'd become convinced that he had done irreversible damage, and after becoming obsessed with new age spirituality had also totally convinced himself that he would be reincarnated as many times as needed to get it 'right'. This lead to no fear of death, which ultimately killed him as much as anything else.

 

Yes I agree that mental heath care is a joke. After being involuntarily admitted into St Vincents after flipping out soon after 9/11, and spending the night bashing into walls of the padded cell in a straight jacket (yes he was very much like a caged wild cat that night), they let him go home two days later with NO follow ups.

 

He would repeatedly tell us all (including the health care workers) about his attempts of gassing himself, and explain that he needed better tape for the exhaust/hose connection next time, or that he ran out of petrol, etc. He'd say it was just another thing he was no good at. It sounds like I'm joking, but we'd be told over and over that "The ones who say they will, never do". Maybe not all of them do, but I can say that some certainly do. I spent so many times trying to convince him that he needed to try to hang on, and that he'd work it all out. He would flatly refuse it and almost cheerfully say "And you can't follow me around all the time either. It's up to me"

 

On the day of his death he was happy. He called a few of his friends and said how good things were going (yes very common). The strange thing was he was halfway through doing something. It was unlike him to leave something unfinished like that. But something tiggered a switch (maybe something on the radio...), and he layed down his tools, filled up his car, bought some whiskey, and drove out to the bush where he properly taped the hose up, got quietly drunk and listened to some of his favourite music, and was reported missing two days later to be found another later.

 

The only clue of a trigger was that his councillor had suggested he wrote a list of all the things he'd regretted. It was on his made bed. The councillor was 'sorry' to have asked him to write that list, but thought it would be a good idea as the list might not be very long. It was REALLY hard to read that list (and yes it was very long), as some of the things included letting me down over a few things.

 

Actually I found some old tapes of his the other day and have been listening to them. It's the first time I've heard his voice since he died in 2003 when he said it was cool I was going to Hawaii and to have a surf over there for him (I did). I've been working late and listening to us talk and laugh together. It's nice, but it's also very hard. I actually don't think I should listen to anymore, especially by myself in the middle of the night.

 

Anyway I was trying to keep this post short. Sorry. I guess what I wanted to say was to keep at it even when things are in a deep trough. After reading that last line, it feels flimsy and useless, but just like with Wayne I still don't know the perfect thing to say. It's bloody hard. All the best to everyone who is struggling with depression or anything esle.

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I have to say this thread is so much more than what I thought would eventuate when I started it. I can now list it as my proudest Trannie moment.

 

To everyone who has posted about personal events, THANK YOU.

 

It can't be easy.

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