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Experience with Prostrate Cancer

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Well, what are people's experience with prostrate cancer?

 

I know a bloke that has it and it's also spread to the hip (top of the femur), femur has gone rock hard and marrow is leaking from a hole that has eaten into the bone. Femur is slowly fracturing as the bone is rock hard.

 

Rated a 10 on the Gleason scale, PSA at about 85, was just under 6 eight months ago.

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This might be a massive generalisation...

My dad had it, but if you get it when you are older it's no drama. It is not aggressive later in life, and omething else generally gets you before the cancer.

 

Then again your mate is experiencing something entirely different.

Sorry to hear

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BTW it is spelt prostate. Been there, done that, got the T-shirt.

 

My advice to all males is to have your PSA (protein specific antigen) count checked via blood test every 12 months from your late 40's onwards. Many people have an annual blood test for other things like cholesterol so it is a simple matter to have your GP add that test too.

 

A rising PSA count over the years is an indicator that you may need a biopsy to clarify the situation further. My father died with prostate cancer rather than from it when in his 80's. Mine was discovered in my late 50's and although in the early stages I was told that it could take me out within 15 years if I did nothing. Consequently, I had it removed before it had a chance to spread outside that organ and I should remain in remission for the rest of my life.

 

Nevertheless there is a downside but I wont go into that - the upside is that I am alive, able to train everyday and get to enjoy my four grandchildren.

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Sorry to hear about your mate. My dad had it, diagnosed later in life, successful surgery, the secondaries killed him about 8 years later.

 

There are no generalisations, except that if not caught early it is nasty. Like most cancers which is why the disease terrifies most of us.

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had my PSA done

 

should go back soon

 

basically doctor said ALL men get prostate cancer at some stage

it's just a matter of whether it's that which you die from

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My advice to all males is to have your PSA (protein specific antigen) count checked via blood test every 12 months from your late 40's onwards. Many people have an annual blood test for other things like cholesterol so it is a simple matter to have your GP add that test too.

 

.

 

Jon, Totally agree except I think its better to start at 40, or even possibly earlier.

 

I currently have Prostate Cancer and it was only picked up through a general check up and blood test. I had no symptoms at all, and still don't. I am 43. Biopsy revealed cancer in 2 of the 6 segments.

 

I am having mine removed 10 days after Port IM.

 

OL - real bad news about your mate. His levels are very, very high. I wish him all the best.

 

Cheers

 

NSF

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My dad just had his removed, after battling prostate issues for years. He's 68 though... It did made me realise that next time I'm getting a blood test done, this will be part of it.

 

Oh, 6 weeks after his operation he is now back on his bike.

 

Good luck to your mate.

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Good luck with your op notsofast, and especially with the recovery and any possible ongoing side effects. Hope it all works out ok.

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Yes, good luck NSF. Two guys at work recently had there's removed through "robotic" surgery. The one I'm speaking about,they've decided to hormone it and shrink it through radiation. Was talking hip replacement at one stage but seem to have backed of from that.

 

Its one of those cancers where you speak to people and you wonder what is the right option in treatment. Guess you are in the hands of the quacks.

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My dad had it when he died but it's not what killed him. My boss got diagnosed @ 60 and went the full removal and came out with excellent chance of living long but suffered side affects. Also had radiation. Another mate - former premiership winning NRL coach was diagnosed at 41 after a strong family history. Did the 'seed' thing where they embed isotopes (?) into the gland to try and nuke it. That was about 10 years ago and he's kicking along pretty well. He's now a bit of an advocate for prostate cancer research/treatment.

 

As you say OL there's lot of choices and none of them are much fun.

 

I get a PSA test every year as part of normal bloods and, touch wood, always been fine.

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Good to do pelvic floor exercises prior to surgery if you go that option. It helps with recovery of continence and erectile function. Surgical techniques have improved over the last few years but it does depend on how invasive the cancer is and the margins the surgeon has to play with. If you can see a physio preop who specialises in continence they can show you on real time ultrasound ( non invasive) the correct technique. The other tip I have heard is the use of Viagra for endothelial repair for its increase in blood flow to the area. The specialist who spoke to us recommends his patients take it one month prior and 3 months post. It is really expensive though about $12 a tablet and not covered by PBS. Good luck NSF and OL friend.

My husband has been having PSA since turning 40. His dad had a radical prostatectomy at 55 and his grandfather passed away with it at 75. Worth being vigilant men.

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My dad is having some health problems at the moment related to stomach/vomiting and has dropped a couple of stone since Xmas. He's been for a few scans and is having a full body scan this week. But the intial report from the specialist is that despite having a normal PSA and having been checked in recent years, he may respond well to prostate cancer type treatment. But i'm not actually sure what that means?

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Thanks everyone. Fortunately I am of pretty strong mind and I haven't let this worry me at all (wife and kids not so strong but I can only reassure them that I will be ok). My thoughts are, well I have it, nothing I can do about that, so lets look at the options available to treat it and get on with it.

 

On that note, I have a very well respected surgeon performing my nerve sparing radical prosatectomy (I have friends in the medical game who have worked with him and he is rated very highly).In the last 10 years his results in regards to side affects are well below the national averages. Apparently due to my age, radiation is not a good option as the radiation may kill me before the cancer and for this reason finding a radiologist would prove very difficult. The other issue with radiation is you really only get one chance at it as the radiation burns the prostate and there is a high chance of burning it to the bowel making removal almost impossible if radiation is unsuccessful. Brachy therapy (seed as mentioned by Naut) is an option for me but has similar side effects, so I am of mind, just remove it and be done with it.

 

The important thing is everyone who has PC if different and no one treatment is better than another. The best treatment option is the one that suits you.

 

OL, I have investigated the "robotic" treatment but early results show the same benefits as a skilled surgeon (which mine apparently is). Robotics not available in Newcastle also. I could travel to Sydney but would rather be closer to family in a private hospital about 5km from home.

 

KTJ - you are spot on with everything you say. I started Pilates for strengthening core and perform the suggested pelvic floor exercises most days.

 

My research shows that whilst the dreaded side effects will occur, given my age, fitness and mindset, they should be very short lived (relatively) if I stick to the program. Lets face it, this program would be about the only advice any male will follow from any doctor :smartarse:

 

I was always a high candidate as both my father and uncles have had it. Not sure what treatment the uncles had we do not keep in contact, but my father was successful with external beam radiation (he was 62), but as I said before, this is not an option for me.

 

On a brighter note, having the op 10 days after IM will force me to have a good rest :sleep1:

 

You wont hear me bang on about this all the time, but guys, get checked. 1 blood test just may save your life.

 

Cheers

 

NSF

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Good luck to all battling against this.

 

I turned 40 early last year, and at my annual checkup asked the doctor to check my prostate. (I was expecting a digital examination and had geared myself up for it). Initially he refused, citing that at my age it wasn't necessary, especially as there is no known history in my family.

 

I had to insist that this is MY choice, before he reluctantly agreed to the blood test. I was quite shocked at his attitude to be honest. I will insist on annual blood tests at my annual check up to ensure that the "base level" is established as others alluded to above.

 

Whilst this won't prevent it happening, it WILL give a leading indicator to get it early enough.

 

Have seen many good men succumb to this - Book in and get tested people.

 

Cheers

Ayto

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basically doctor said ALL men get prostate cancer at some stage

it's just a matter of whether it's that which you die from

And there is more than more evidence that not all tumors are malignant and some should just be left alone.

 

Heard the other day of an MRI based procedure that was pioneered in the Netherlands but seeming perfected by a group of Aussie doctors that is going a long way to telling between a malignant and benign tumor.

http://www.news.com.au/national/breaking-news/new-painless-diagnosis-for-prostate-cancer/story-e6frfku9-1226866490189

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I think it is awesome in a forum such as this that we can encourage each other to be proactive about health especially when it involves sensitive issues, just saying :-)

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My Pop was diagnosed with cancer at 58 he died aged 86. He initially had prostrate cancer but as time progressed developed into bone cancer, ended up having 2 broken hips (in last 10 years of his life) also had minor lung cancer and a spot on his brain.

 

He survived a long time with it. He had radiation treatment initially but then they gave a slow release treatment which they inserted into him monthly.

 

When he did pass away cancer did not take him but gang green did. All the medication given to him had destroyed his kidneys and reeked havoc with his blood flow. The last 2 months he had severally swollen legs and agonising pain.

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I think it is awesome in a forum such as this that we can encourage each other to be proactive about health especially when it involves sensitive issues, just saying :-)

 

Probably a bit different to some other forums, we dont mind talking about saddle sores, numb nuts, saddles for sensitive girls, how to best apply lube, shaving techniques etc, so its not really a big leap,,, but yeah its good that we can.

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Probably a bit different to some other forums, we dont mind talking about saddle sores, numb nuts, saddles for sensitive girls, how to best apply lube, shaving techniques etc, so its not really a big leap,,, but yeah its good that we can

 

It is good - after reading this I realised it's been more than a year since my last doctors visit - so I booked in and have just come home - I'll give blood on Friday morning - see what's happening :smile1:

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I do a reasonably comprehensive set of non-invasive testing every even birthday. It's a good habit to be in. I view it as my birthday present to myself.

 

I book the appointment with the GP for birthday week, then blood tests, skin specialist, bone density all flow on in the ensuing months.

 

Breast screen contacts me. Bowel screen ditto.

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Does Tortoise have a job ?

 

I reckon Yo-Yo's record for posts is under threat here - Yo where are you :shocking:

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Don't stop at the PSA test. The full DRE is suggested (though being a recipient of this test by a medical practioner with what I believe to be sizeable fingers, it is not recommended by me!) :msn-oh::msn-cry:

 

At 52 I have had an annual health check since age 40 and that's part of it. Its a birthday present to myself each year so I don't forget.

Edited by lawman

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Bringing this thread back up because I wanted to do my homework and check with some doctors to see whether my views on this were still current and in line with the best evidence. It seems that they are, and I am confirmed in the view that I will not be seeking a test for prostate cancer unless I develop worrying symptoms or a close male relative is diagnosed. Absent any change in my circumstances I believe that the evidence shows that the probable risks and harms of screening and treatment outweigh the probable benefits.

 

Note that the Prostate Cancer Foundation of Australia does not recommend that every male (of any age) be routinely checked. They recommend men over 50 (or over 40 with a family history of prostate cancer) discuss it with their doctor and make an individual, informed decision. Good advice.

Similarly, the Australian Cancer Council (and Australian Health Ministers Advisory Council) also recommend talking to your doctor and making an informed decision, but their policy paper states:

"Current evidence indicates that the PSA test is not suitable for population screening, as the harms outweigh the benefits."

You'll find similar advice from the peak health bodies from other countries as well.

 

As well meaning as it might be, the increasing trend to recommend that everyone should get tested, take control, DO SOMETHING ABOUT IT... actually threatens a lot of quite needless misery. You are much more likely to die from old age with prostate cancer than to die from it. A lifetime of incontinence and impotence is a high price to pay if its not needed, or at least strongly indicated. Jon, not remotely trying to suggest that you made the wrong choice. On the contrary; you had a family history, you sought the best advice and made a brave and informed decision. Chapeau to you. However having every male tested every year does not accord with expert adice.

 

On the other hand, I have learned that the evidence definitely favours screening for bowel cancer once you are over 50 - simple tests, reliable results, good cost benefit profile. Just do it. I've been put off the whole shitting in a bag and dropping it in the post process, but this test the doc does recommend. There you go.

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wetspot

 

I can understand where you are coming from. The only test I recommended mature males take is the blood test to check their PSA level. That is a simple non-harmful test which if followed up each year, can provide an indication of whether your PSA level is climbing and whether it is approaching what might be considered a 'danger' zone.

 

If your PSA level does climb into the danger zone, then this is where many options are available. I did not suggest any particular course of action at that stage. It is such a personal thing. I sought the advice of four specialists before making my decision. That and only that is what I would strongly recommend to all mature males.

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Yep, got that.

 

Routine PSA testing for all males is not currently recommended, in light of the latest research into harms & benefits (costs, expected life savings, quality of life gained, quality of life lost). People should make their own decisions, but they should know that this is the latest expert opinion.

 

Put another way, if (against my wishes) I was tested and if (against my hopes) I was found to have elevated or rising PSA levels then I would have options available, but I'm pretty sure I know what option I would choose. If asymptomatic, I'd do nothing. (Nothing other than what they call 'active surveillance', which is pretty much what I'd do without testing; i.e. be on the lookout for physical symptoms). It is a personal choice but there have been worrying examples of men for whom it has not been a well informed one.

 

Best case, the stats suggest about 40 'treatments' to save one life (and as you know, the evidence is not clear that testing saves any lives at all). And the treatment is not a simple course of pills. It is radically invasive surgery that leaves most of those treated with incontinence and/or erectile dysfunction (and the patient/health fund/government with a massive bill). Most of those treated would have died at a ripe old age from something else entirely. Again, I entirely respect that your circumstances were particular to you, you were well advised, you made a difficult but informed decision and you feel sure that it was right for you. But the weight of informed opinion is that you shouldn't generalise from your experience to the advice that every man should get tested every year. People should make an informed and personal decision about that, without being made to feel like they are dicing with death if they choose not to. They are not. They are, in fact, following the best available advice. And if more people did that in relation to other health concerns then lives really would be saved and improved.

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Routine PSA testing for all males is not currently recommended, in light of the latest research into harms & benefits (costs, expected life savings, quality of life gained, quality of life lost).

 

PSA is not the be all and end all but I'm really not seeing the 'harm' in getting checked. PSA is just a tick on the blood test sheet (I have a blood test every year anyway). If it shows a sudden or dramatic jump I think it would be opportune to discuss it with your GP. A digital rectal exam tests for an enlarged/abnormal gland and, to the best of my knowledge, is harmless and recommended.

 

I doubt any Dr is going to recommend a radical prostatectomy based on a PSA test. They're clearly going to investigate an abnormal reading and they might request a biopsy but no-ones gonna lop out your manhood because your PSA is 2 points too high.

 

But to each their own, if you decide testing is not for you then so be it. I doubt anyone could say regular testing has harmed me.

 

And for what it's worth, my boss was diagnosed from a PSA test and was very, very lucky to have caught it when he did.

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You guys are lucky that you get the option for a screening test. Ovarian cancer is rarely detected until it's too late. No known test. And they mostly get left in situ if the other plumbing gets removed as they continue to produce hormones which are beneficial for ageing.

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I've had the symptoms for over 10 years, never really worried about it, put it down to bike riding. But a few years ago, GP ordered an ultrasound when the symptoms intensified, that showed a 'shadow', so he ordered a biopsy (which was performed by a visiting one-eyed Sri Lankan urologist from Port Mac - I kid you not :shock: - the nurses at the local hospital assured me he was very good though). 12 holes punched and cores taken.....they do this through your bowel :shocking: (his remaining eye must work ok thank Christ ), the results came back clear. But he recommended a PSA test every 6-12mths which I do, it has only moved from 3.2 to 3.6 over 5yrs, so that's promising. And unfortunately my GP has the biggest frikin finger you've ever seen.....I'm not lucky Tortoise :(

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I didn't mention Pap smears did I? Ask your wives how small are those specula, not to mention cold. And they start when you're under 20, so it's a lifetime investment in annual joy.

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I didn't mention Pap smears did I? Ask your wives how small are those specula, not to mention cold. And they start when you're under 20, so it's a lifetime investment in annual joy.

Yeah, I know.....but why the Hell didn't I opt for a small female GP when I had the chance :shocking:

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Am I reading this right, my cancer is worse than your cancer ?

 

Anyways, get a blood test re the Psa, can't see the harm, can get your mri's etc post that, and invasive's after that.

 

I've just watched an elevated Psa blood test go to cancer landing on other parts of the body within 12 months, struggling to walk 500mtrs as the femur is getting eaten for lack of a better word.

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Yep, got that.

 

Routine PSA testing for all males is not currently recommended, in light of the latest research into harms & benefits (costs, expected life savings, quality of life gained, quality of life lost). People should make their own decisions, but they should know that this is the latest expert opinion.

 

Put another way, if (against my wishes) I was tested and if (against my hopes) I was found to have elevated or rising PSA levels then I would have options available, but I'm pretty sure I know what option I would choose. If asymptomatic, I'd do nothing. (Nothing other than what they call 'active surveillance', which is pretty much what I'd do without testing; i.e. be on the lookout for physical symptoms). It is a personal choice but there have been worrying examples of men for whom it has not been a well informed one.

 

Best case, the stats suggest about 40 'treatments' to save one life (and as you know, the evidence is not clear that testing saves any lives at all). And the treatment is not a simple course of pills. It is radically invasive surgery that leaves most of those treated with incontinence and/or erectile dysfunction (and the patient/health fund/government with a massive bill). Most of those treated would have died at a ripe old age from something else entirely. Again, I entirely respect that your circumstances were particular to you, you were well advised, you made a difficult but informed decision and you feel sure that it was right for you. But the weight of informed opinion is that you shouldn't generalise from your experience to the advice that every man should get tested every year. People should make an informed and personal decision about that, without being made to feel like they are dicing with death if they choose not to. They are not. They are, in fact, following the best available advice. And if more people did that in relation to other health concerns then lives really would be saved and improved.

No disrespect wet spot but where are you getting your latest expert opinion from??? Prostate cancer isn't that clear cut. You are correct in suggesting that most men will have enlarged prostates as a result of ageing and this is very slow progression and not likely to kill you however not every tumour is the same. Some are invasive, fast growing and can be relatively a symptomatic if the tumour doesn't directly affect the urethra or nerve supply. I think everyone on here was suggesting vigilance not mass radical prostectomys. A PSA test is a blood test and establishes a base line. It's not dissimilar to having your cholesterol levels checked and being able to monitor over time for change. I think taking a healthy interest in your general health is smart and responsible. I think saying "most people treated would have died of old age anyway" is just wrong. You should perhaps look up the stats of the younger prostate patient and then see if that generalisation sticks.

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No disrespect wet spot but where are you getting your latest expert opinion from?

1 Consults with 3 different doctors on the topic

2 Cancer Council of Australia

3 Australian Health Ministers Advisory Council

4 Prostate Cancer Foundation of Australia

5 American Cancer Society

6 Prostate Cancer UK

7 PubMed

8 Interviews with a survivor, and the brother and son of a victim

9 Countless other resources

 

Prostate cancer isn't that clear cut....

 

Correct. That is one of the points I am trying to make. There has been an error in public policy that experts are trying to correct. A perception has arisen that every male should be tested. It is not clear cut that there is any public benefit in that. It is not, in fact, recommended. A perception has arisen that a positive test should result in surgical intervention, to "save lives". That is not clear cut either.

As I think you acknowledge, testing can give both false positives and false negatives. The bigger problem though is that most prostate cancers are relatively slow growing and benign within a man's lifespan. Many men will die with it, not from it. Some (comparatively few) are fast growing and fatal. The problem is that current testing methods cannot distinguish between these. The consequence of this is false positive results, unnecessary anxiety, overtreatment and significant loss of quality of life.

 

That is why, for example, the Chair of the US Preventative Services Taskforce, which recommends against screening, said that

“There is a very small potential benefit and significant potential harms”. That is why my doctor told me the same thing.

 

 

I think saying "most people treated would have died of old age anyway" is just wrong. You should perhaps look up the stats of the younger prostate patient and then see if that generalisation sticks.

No disrespect, but I think basing medical decisions based on what someone "thinks" is just wrong. I'd go with the evidence, and the expert advice. I'm not wrong, and it is you who should check where you are getting your opinions.

Edited by wetspot

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After many years in the sport and a constant stalker of this site (the constant banter is a joy to read) I have finally taken the step to join in as this topic is close to my heart.

 

I having just been through the Prostate Op the weekend before IM Melb. So far the whole prostate has not been removed but have had what they call a TURP (the rough term is a rebore). Not the end of the world.

 

Now able to start to train again after a month of no driving, lifting or anything excessive.

 

I have been dealing with this for 5 years before having the Op and still have a bit further to travel as they have found traces of cancer cells in the mass removed. This means MRI and more tests, and then possibly complete removal. The good thing is that it was picked up early and in the longer term will not stop me from doing the things that I want and I will allow me to lead a full life past this point. Early medical intervention is the key.

 

One of the things that the surgeon said to me was that the old bike seats irritate your prostate. This was a bit of a surprise. Now I need to find a seat that removes the pressure on what is left of my prostate. This is good as I get to spend some money on a new toy.

 

From my experience the best thing is get tested every 6 months after 45yo and get a new seat that removes any pressure from the area. Better to get checked and know all is clear than to find out when it is too late. Take care.

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1 Consults with 3 different doctors on the topic

2 Cancer Council of Australia

3 Australian Health Ministers Advisory Council

4 Prostate Cancer Foundation of Australia

5 American Cancer Society

6 Prostate Cancer UK

7 PubMed

8 Interviews with a survivor, and the brother and son of a victim

9 Countless other resources

 

 

 

Correct. That is one of the points I am trying to make. There has been an error in public policy that experts are trying to correct. A perception has arisen that every male should be tested. It is not clear cut that there is any public benefit in that. It is not, in fact, recommended. A perception has arisen that a positive test should result in surgical intervention, to "save lives". That is not clear cut either.

As I think you acknowledge, testing can give both false positives and false negatives. The bigger problem though is that most prostate cancers are relatively slow growing and benign within a man's lifespan. Many men will die with it, not from it. Some (comparatively few) are fast growing and fatal. The problem is that current testing methods cannot distinguish between these. The consequence of this is false positive results, unnecessary anxiety, overtreatment and significant loss of quality of life.

 

That is why, for example, the Chair of the US Preventative Services Taskforce, which recommends against screening, said that

“There is a very small potential benefit and significant potential harms”. That is why my doctor told me the same thing.

 

 

 

No disrespect, but I think basing medical decisions based on what someone "thinks" is just wrong. I'd go with the evidence, and the expert advice. I'm not wrong, and it is you who should check where you are getting your opinions.

Wet spot It is fantastic that you have done heaps of research on this topic and then made an informed decision about what you feel is correct for your health. However I have also read all of the above (completed my post grad last year on continence) and the main point that I take away is that early detection can save lives. There is very little to no research to say PSA testing is "harmful". The documents you refer can't even be called recommendations as they have no evidential basis. It is good practise to always recognise that there can be false negatives because there is no perfect test yet and doctors are advised to reassure their patients that an increased PSA level may not be indicative of prostate cancer and active surveillance to monitor increases is usually advised. But if you don't have a baseline in the first place how will you ever know???

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You take care too. I know the case I am talking off, a 6 month check would probably have had a different outcome re migration to other parts of the body. So sound advice from where I sit.

 

Re the saddle, I assume you are talking about one with a hole in the middle so to speak, like a Cobb max plus as opposed to a cut away like Adamo or the Cobb jof.

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In my case my PSA reading doubled in 18 months, and although still not high by any means, the sudden increase suggested I should be referred to a Urologist. The Urologist was equally concerned and suggested a biopsy (completely my choice) to confirm or deny the presence of cancer. Unfortunately 2 of the 6 segments returned positive.

 

Wetspot - you are correct in everyone should make an informed decision based on their individual circumstances. My choice is to just get rid of it. I am hopeful that the side effects will be relatively short lived (fingers crossed). This decision was not taken lightly and research was performed, other opinions sought and discussed with family.

 

I see no harm in getting tested for PSA for no other reason than monitoring. I had no symptoms at all, only aware after blood test for other matters.

 

BTW my GP put me on a dose of anti-inflamatory antibiotics before sending me to Urologist as he also stated that whilst not yet scientifically proven, there is a strong relationship between cyclist who ride big km's and elevated PSA readings. My levels did not change after course of antibiotics :(

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In the period between diagnosis and prostate removal (around 6 months) I did plenty of research and one of the recommendations I found was that there is something in hot chillies that was supposed to reduce your PSA level. Consequently I went on a daily consumption of the hottest chilli known to man. I would chop it finely and add it to my evening hot meal. Apart from increasing my tolerance for chilli it did absolutely nothing for my PSA level over a period of three months.

 

Just thought I would save anyone the trouble who might be thinking of going down this route.

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My Dad has been in hospital since last Thurs undergoing tests. He met with the consultant yesterday and the blood tests show something different to the scan (in terms of what the actual problem is) but they think its either prostate or bladder cancer. The medical team is meeting today and they will meet with Dad and my Mum again tomorrow to decide an action plan.

 

I don't know if it's all the years I've away from the family or all the surgery and adversity I myself suffered away from them, but I feel strangely detached from it all. I tend to be very pragmatic about these things and when I need the strength to get through surgery/injury and rehab i've always been much stronger than I tend to appear on the outside (I always treat it like an endurance event).

 

My Dad is a 'tough talking, John Wayne era, show no emotion' type of guy. But I've been amazed how deflated he is and how little resolve he seems to have to mentally prepare for a fight for his health. He is 81 now and never really been sick before.

 

I hope once there is an action plan he changes tack but of course its easier said than done.

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Every comment that has been made sounds so familiar. Over the 5 years I have had antibiotics, been told not to ride my bike for a week before a PSA test. My PSA was only 18 having jumped from 8 to 11 to 18. Biggest problem was that you can have issue that see an inability to pee which then means a trip to the hospital and a most uncomfortable process to relieve the pain.

 

After two total shut downs the decision was made to do the TURP. Ends up rather than the prostate being the size of a walnut and was the size of a large orange. Thank god it is not removed.

 

Again guys no harm in being safe.

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(I always treat it like an endurance event).

 

Interesting you should say that Ian, because after nearly 2 years of pain & frustration, that's become my approach too. It took 18mths to reach that point (I just wanted to get back to what I used to be able to do pronto), and there are still many days where what I do now seems pointless, boring and lame but treating the whole process as a long slow endurance event is something I've found helpful.

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My Dad has to have more tests that include a bone biopsy, is that a big deal?

Not much different to a biopsy of the prostate itself. Day surgery - not sure surgery is the right word, yes, it's invasive, but walk out etc. Seemed simpler than a knee clean out.

Edited by Oompa Loompa

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Not much different to a biopsy of the prostate itself. Day surgery - not sure surgery is the right word, yes, it's invasive, but walk out etc. Seemed simpler than a knee clean out.

 

 

Thanks. He's already in hospital (been a week now) so he won't be out until they have a proper plan and apparently he won't be going anywhere until the biopsy is done.

 

He's always watching those US shows like NCIS, so I told him to be tough like Gibbs, not McGee :)

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On ‎8‎/‎04‎/‎2014 at 5:28 PM, wetspot said:

Bringing this thread back up because I wanted to do my homework and check with some doctors to see whether my views on this were still current and in line with the best evidence...

"Current evidence indicates that the PSA test is not suitable for population screening, as the harms outweigh the benefits."...

You are much more likely to die from old age with prostate cancer than to die from it.

It seems there are some varying opinions on the testing and treatment for Prostate Cancer...

The Prostate Cancer Foundation of Australia website states that 'more men die of prostate cancer than women die of breast cancer' - About 3000 a year!

After having a general check-up and blood test (prior to getting back into training) I got an urgent call back to see the Doctor due to an 'elevated total PSA level'.  The Doc didn't pull any punches and has requested that I have another round of Blood (PSA free / total ration & LFTs) & Urine (M/C/S) tests, plus a Renal Ultrasound, plus a 24 Hr Ambulatory Blood Pressure Monitor.

So far I haven't had any symptoms of Prostate (or any other) Cancer apart from feeling a bit tired and maybe a few extra trips to water the horses at night, which I was putting down to age and over hydrating due to doing a bit more exercise.  So was a little bit surprised by the Doctors reaction to the slightly high PSA.

I'm just wondering if there's been any more recent thoughts on Prostate testing - surely having the above tests and scans done can't hurt can it?

Just asking for a friend of course :shy:.

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Firstly good luck mate. 

Secondly I don't think any testing is a problem, the more information the better. 

I think its the next possible step where the real conjecture lies, with treatment options and there relative merits versus side effects. 

Not an expert but I suppose it depends where the test results lead you. 

I did hear once though that lots of men die with prostate cancer, not too many die of prostate cancer. 

But I suppose that perspective all changes when just one of those people becomes YOU. 

Again good luck mate. 

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