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Clydesdale

Cairns 70.3 build

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Hi Everyone,

 

This has probably been done to death but I did a few searches and wasn't coming up with much.

 

I've been racing Sprint and Olympic distance races all year. My longest long run this year was 15km had a foot injury which has limited me to 8km runs. 5km pace 4:25 per km 10km pace is 4.45 - 5 min.

 

Its 2 and a bit months to the race and I'm now good to go.

 

My swimming is sweet normally front of the pack in my races similar in my ride TT's. Long rides of up to 200kms. Including 3 peaks and alpine classic just need to build the time on the Aero bars now.

 

I'm looking at advice to get me through the run with a descent base in the remaining time I have.

 

My initial plan is to run off my long ride on a sat starting with 15min and build it to race day. Just not sure how much to add each week and what to cap it at. Then Sunday do my long run starting with 6km and adding each week again not sure how much to build it up by.

 

I have no problem with a bit of walk/ run towards the end of the race.

 

All advice is definitely appreciated.

 

Cheers

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Are you a genuine Clydesdale?

 

Running off the bike and long run next day sounds like a very bad idea.

 

If you need to run off the bike, which I dont think is necessary, move the long run to mid week.

 

You're dealing with risk management here. Being a big dude means you have to be very careful with how much you run and particularly how much you drag your ass just to get through a session with bad technique.

 

IMO you're better served by getting a lot stronger on the bike so you can be as fresh as possible for the run. Distance wise you are in a good place. Build it to 18-20km in your long runs but make sure you are starting and finishing at around the same pace, if your pace is dropping off at the end of your long runs you are going too far.

 

Plenty of time to get ready for that race.

 

Oh losing a bit of weight is not going to hurt either ;)

Edited by Rog

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Are you a genuine Clydesdale?

 

Running off the bike and long run next day sounds like a very bad idea.

 

If you need to run off the bike, which I dont think is necessary, move the long run to mid week.

 

You're dealing with risk management here. Being a big dude means you have to be very careful with how much you run and particularly how much you drag your ass just to get through a session with bad technique.

 

IMO you're better served by getting a lot stronger on the bike so you can be as fresh as possible for the run. Distance wise you are in a good place. Build it to 18-20km in your long runs but make sure you are starting and finishing at around the same pace, if your pace is dropping off at the end of your long runs you are going too far.

 

Plenty of time to get ready for that race.

 

Oh losing a bit of weight is not going to hurt either ;)

 

 

 

Yep genuine clydesdale. 105kgs 6'6 tall ex rugby player used to be 135kg. 105 is about my right weight no gut but no six pack either. will prob drop a couple of kgs in the lead up to Cairns. aim to race at about 100kgs havent actually been that light since I was about 15!!

 

Bike is no problems. Understand your advice re long run. thats why I was asking if my thinking was sound.

 

Im happy with one run the day after my ride Sat/Sun back to back. If Im starting with 6kms this Sun should I just add a km a week?

 

during the week is three 4km swims a wind trainer session and a brick session.

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Although I am nowhere near your weight I am reasonably solidly built (for a triathlete). Some years ago I changed from being a heel striker to a mid sole striker and my knees loved me for it. I had had two operations on my left knee in the past decade and was told by the orthopedic surgeon to stop running. Having ignored that advice I knew that I had to preserve whatever was left inside that knee. Changing my foot strike and wearing Newtons gave me a new lease on running and hopefully extended my triathlon career. I am now 64 years old.

 

PS As an ex rugby player living in Melb, what's with the Hawthorn avatar?

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Changing my foot strike and wearing Newtons gave me a new lease on running and hopefully extended my triathlon career. I am now 64 years old.

 

 

If this has worked for you Jon that's great - but I do believe Newtons have shortened many more triathlon careers than they have ever been credited with lengthening them :shy:

 

I would think Clydesdale would benefit greatly by paying a good bit of attention to his running technique (foot strike - posture - knee stability - core strength) but I would warn him that I'm not the only coach to view Newtons as "injury in a box" - especially for a mature age runner :shock:

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I think it helps if you have strong calves to help offset the stress that comes from striking mid sole and consequently reducing the impact on the knees. Just a personal observation. Whilst I use Newtons I believe any running shoe that encourages you to move away from heel striking would have the same benefit.

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Everyonee else in your category would like you to get some newtons.

 

Make sure your first run in them is 25k minimum.

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Although I am nowhere near your weight I am reasonably solidly built (for a triathlete). Some years ago I changed from being a heel striker to a mid sole striker and my knees loved me for it. I had had two operations on my left knee in the past decade and was told by the orthopedic surgeon to stop running. Having ignored that advice I knew that I had to preserve whatever was left inside that knee. Changing my foot strike and wearing Newtons gave me a new lease on running and hopefully extended my triathlon career. I am now 64 years old.

 

PS As an ex rugby player living in Melb, what's with the Hawthorn avatar?

 

 

Hey Jon Moved to Melb 8 years ago all my circle of friends were Hawks supporters went to alot of games and the love of the game and the team grew from there. Was lucky enough to be at the MCG in 2008 when we knocked off the Cats and it hurt a fair bit when I was there last year when we lost to the swans.

Still love league but dont get alot of coverage down here and I follow the Dragons so no put putting that logo up.

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If this has worked for you Jon that's great - but I do believe Newtons have shortened many more triathlon careers than they have ever been credited with lengthening them :shy:

 

I would think Clydesdale would benefit greatly by paying a good bit of attention to his running technique (foot strike - posture - knee stability - core strength) but I would warn him that I'm not the only coach to view Newtons as "injury in a box" - especially for a mature age runner :shock:

 

 

No issues with shoes (the only ones I can get to fit are Asics Kayanos). Ive got a size 16 foot so very limited in my options there.

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Ive got a size 16 foot

 

I've got a mate who lives in northern Canada - he said he's seen your footprints up there in the forest :shocking:

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I too have found Newtons have worked for me. I had a gait analysis done after picking multiple calf strains running in brooks racer & Nike lunar spider. The video analysis showed I was most stable in newtons.

 

Not for everyone. The reason I moved away from newtons was because I heard multiple people say there an injury in a box!

 

Turns out the others were worse for me

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I started my Ironman debut racing at in 2006 @ 104kg. I did a 10:55 at Port Mac. Over time I have dropped down to my lean weight of 86kg.

 

I did this by engaging a good nutritionist and it is now heaps easier, especially running.

 

But big does not equal slow and you will have a big engine which is suited to the big miles. I do as well and (touch wood) have never had an injury and now I have done 7 with a PB of 9:53.

 

I have religiously done my long ride Saturday and long run Sunday so don't be worried about that method. Works well. I used Mark Allen online for many years as a template but now use my coach. I am getting way better results through him. I recommend using a coach as they can see you day in and day out and modify things according to your adaption.

 

Tip would be to gradually take the distance up as you've got 10 weeks this Sunday.

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I've got a mate who lives in northern Canada - he said he's seen your footprints up there in the forest :shocking:

 

 

You got me there AP! Dont tell the Henderson's Im hiding out down under.............

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I started my Ironman debut racing at in 2006 @ 104kg. I did a 10:55 at Port Mac. Over time I have dropped down to my lean weight of 86kg.

 

I did this by engaging a good nutritionist and it is now heaps easier, especially running.

 

But big does not equal slow and you will have a big engine which is suited to the big miles. I do as well and (touch wood) have never had an injury and now I have done 7 with a PB of 9:53.

 

I have religiously done my long ride Saturday and long run Sunday so don't be worried about that method. Works well. I used Mark Allen online for many years as a template but now use my coach. I am getting way better results through him. I recommend using a coach as they can see you day in and day out and modify things according to your adaption.

 

Tip would be to gradually take the distance up as you've got 10 weeks this Sunday.

 

 

 

Hey Harts thats the plan. 120 - 150km ride Sat 6km run Sunday. Im going to add 1 km a week till the week before the race.

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Why not try rotating Sunday runs??

 

One week run 90mins, next do 60-90mins on the trainer and 6 or so 2km repeats of it. Run them on 11 mins or so so you have a little rest in between. Build to 10 2km repeats. Then you'll be confident and smack the run.

 

If running is your weakness train it.

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Why not try rotating Sunday runs??

 

One week run 90mins, next do 60-90mins on the trainer and 6 or so 2km repeats of it. Run them on 11 mins or so so you have a little rest in between. Build to 10 2km repeats. Then you'll be confident and smack the run.

 

If running is your weakness train it.

 

 

Sounds good. Just to clarify when you say 60-90 mins on the trainer are you talking about Wind trainer followed by 12km of 2km repeats?

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Sounds good. Just to clarify when you say 60-90 mins on the trainer are you talking about Wind trainer followed by 12km of 2km repeats?

 

Yes.. Start at 6 repeats build to 10 repeats.

 

You would ride about 90% of FTP in a half so vary the intensity on the trainer from 70-90 in 20-30 minute intervals.

 

 

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Yes.. Start at 6 repeats build to 10 repeats.

 

You would ride about 90% of FTP in a half so vary the intensity on the trainer from 70-90 in 20-30 minute intervals.

 

 

 

Sweet Thanks

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