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20 minutes ago, Turtle said:

It would be nice, but how do we pay for that?  Especially when there are way more degrees than ever before for jobs that didn't have degrees previously.

I don't get people whinging about university fees etc. You don't pay up front. You don't have to go to university. 60 per cent of your fees are paid for by other peoples taxes. WHAT MORE DO PEOPLE WANT.

I "hate" paying my HECS back, but I'm earning a lot more than I would have without my degree so I'm happy to pay, after all, I benefit more from my education than anyone else - and I'm only paying for 40% of it! What could be fairer (apart from me paying for more of it perhaps)? 

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3 minutes ago, Ex-Hasbeen said:

And then you look at the current way of paying for it. That person billed $500K will never pay for it anyway, cause they'll never earn enough in Australia to start paying HECS, or whatever it's called now.

 

and normal hecs is a lot to be in deb for and they are usually young and still need to get into the real estate market. It is going to be pretty tough for kids in the future

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8 minutes ago, Prince said:

and normal hecs is a lot to be in deb for and they are usually young and still need to get into the real estate market. It is going to be pretty tough for kids in the future

They should just work harder..

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59 minutes ago, dazaau said:

I "hate" paying my HECS back, but I'm earning a lot more than I would have without my degree so I'm happy to pay

I paid a HECS debt for a degree I never used, but I didn’t complain about it, I was grateful for the opportunity the taxpayers afforded me in going to uni

Both kids are now racking up HECS/ HELP debts and I’m just happy they’re getting a tertiary education 

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1 hour ago, Katz said:

This is my way of thinking to a large extent. Professional degrees (those with almost certainty of employment) are free/heavily subsidised. Other degrees which might be nice to do, but may or may not readily lead to employment, much pricier.

 

In our household

my wife has a BA in English Literature, and now earns in the top 10% contributing more tax a year than I earn in total.

I have a BE (chemical engineering) which is professional qualification, plus 2 other professional either Industry or Uni qual. And earn allot less.

Neither of us work in what we qualified in 30 years ago. But the piece off paper was handy over the years.

Additionally we now are in a situation where we pay all this tax, can't vote and our kids can't access hecs. So they are have gone/going to NZ to have zero fee's for first year Uni

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6 minutes ago, rory-dognz said:

In our household

my wife has a BA in English Literature, and now earns in the top 10% contributing more tax a year than I earn in total.

I have a BE (chemical engineering) which is professional qualification, plus 2 other professional either Industry or Uni qual. And earn allot less.

Neither of us work in what we qualified in 30 years ago. But the piece off paper was handy over the years.

Additionally we now are in a situation where we pay all this tax, can't vote and our kids can't access hecs. So they are have gone/going to NZ to have zero fee's for first year Uni

Seems a high price to pay for not becoming dual citizens! Your Kiwi friends will forgive you eventually...

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Just now, dazaau said:

Seems a high price to pay for not becoming dual citizens! Your Kiwi friends will forgive you eventually...

The Duel citizen is not a path open to Kiwi's like us who move back and forth.

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1 hour ago, Katz said:

This is my way of thinking to a large extent. Professional degrees (those with almost certainty of employment) are free/heavily subsidised. Other degrees which might be nice to do, but may or may not readily lead to employment, much pricier.

And for heavens sake, stop forcing kids who haven't got a clue what they want to do to go to uni, just because........get a job, do national service, whatever (except laze around mooching off your parents), but don't go and take up space and money at uni.

I agree. I know a few people who are 'professional students' - they have an alphabet of letters after their name but have never actually worked other than serving coffees in the Uni cafe. Perhaps there needs to be a restriction that once you've done a degree you need to work at least 2 years in that field before you can enrol for a new,  unrelated degree. You can still do it, but you pay up front.

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13 minutes ago, rory-dognz said:

In our household

my wife has a BA in English Literature, and now earns in the top 10% contributing more tax a year than I earn in total.

I have a BE (chemical engineering) which is professional qualification, plus 2 other professional either Industry or Uni qual. And earn allot less.

Neither of us work in what we qualified in 30 years ago. But the piece off paper was handy over the years.

Additionally we now are in a situation where we pay all this tax, can't vote and our kids can't access hecs. So they are have gone/going to NZ to have zero fee's for first year Uni

I agree it's an imperfect solution and there will always be exceptions. 

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2 hours ago, dazaau said:

I don't get people whinging about university fees etc. You don't pay up front. You don't have to go to university. 60 per cent of your fees are paid for by other peoples taxes. WHAT MORE DO PEOPLE WANT.

I "hate" paying my HECS back, but I'm earning a lot more than I would have without my degree so I'm happy to pay, after all, I benefit more from my education than anyone else - and I'm only paying for 40% of it! What could be fairer (apart from me paying for more of it perhaps)? 

We paid Mrs FP's degree up front,  semester by semester (IIRC).  There was a discount but we could only afford it because we both worked full time and she did her degree part time.  It sucked at the time but the thought of no lingering debt was a relief.

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Looks like Tanya is not throwing her hat in the ring, even though she says she has the numbers.

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2 minutes ago, Ex-Hasbeen said:

Looks like Tanya is not throwing her hat in the ring, even though she says she has the numbers.

said no truthful politician ever :lol:

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33 minutes ago, FatPom said:

We paid Mrs FP's degree up front,  semester by semester (IIRC).  There was a discount but we could only afford it because we both worked full time and she did her degree part time.  It sucked at the time but the thought of no lingering debt was a relief.

as long as you have a mortgage it makes sense to pay off your HECS last, given that the interest paid is lower than a mortgage and should you lose your job they won't ask for their money - unlike the mortgage payments. But it is nice to not have it dragging on your take home pay - I can't wait till mine is paid (but wait I shall have to....)

Edited by dazaau
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Chinese Sam wanted Wong. He may be out of touch. He must still be in the Jungle.

Edited by Prince

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I paid off my monstrous HECS debt a few years back, then promptly started a non-commonwealth supported post-graduate degree in another field, which I didn't end up finishing and obviously don't work in the area of. Sadly in a very short period of time I totalled up about the same amount in debt as I had previously paid off and will now likely be paying for an incomplete qualification for the remainder of my days. That I regret. The original debt which allows me the income I enjoy did not.

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I paid mine up front as I went. I studied part time, and there was still a 30% discount for paying up front. Considering I was already way over the threshold, and would have paid most of each semester off before the end of it, it was a no-brainer.

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30 minutes ago, Ex-Hasbeen said:

Looks like Tanya is not throwing her hat in the ring, even though she says she has the numbers.

Free tips for the Labor party.

Leave the past behind and have a proper clean out.

Chris Bowen is tarred with the same brush as Bill Shorten - his arrogance makes him unelectable.

Tanya Plebisek is much the same - she would clearly appeal to female voters but is unlikely to get broader support and there's the whole husband/heroin-trafficker thing.

Albo is popular but only slightly younger than me - by the next election he will be thinking more about retirement than moving into the Lodge. Maybe he's a sucker for punishment and wants to give it a go but 3 years is a long time in opposition - especially after spending the past 6 years there.

Joel Fitzgibbon is considering - he might be worth a go - he's not a star but he's also not offensive.

Tony Bourke can be a tosser but also a decent bloke. I've had a bit to do with him. Plays a bit of guitar and likes the same music as me - can't be all bad.

Penny Wong has already said she won't move to the lower house - that's good, I don't like her either.

It's time they faced the realisation the tactics and personnel of the past 6 years aren't the right people to win government. Rip off the band-aid and get some new blood in there. Falling back on Bowen or Plebisek would be disastrous. As much as I voted Libs this time around it would be nice to have a genuine, moderate alternative for next time.

The quality of a government will always be related to the quality of the opposition.

Edited by trinube

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3 minutes ago, Ex-Hasbeen said:

I paid mine up front as I went. I studied part time, and there was still a 30% discount for paying up front. Considering I was already way over the threshold, and would have paid most of each semester off before the end of it, it was a no-brainer.

30% discount. Totally worth it. Gone are those days! 

Like Katz I also studied in a non CSP place post my money earning degree. That one stings.  

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35 minutes ago, trinube said:

Free tips for the Labor party.

Leave the past behind and have a proper clean out.

Chris Bowen is tarred with the same brush as Bill Shorten - his arrogance makes him unelectable.

Tanya Plebisek is much the same - she would clearly appeal to female voters but is unlikely to get broader support and there's the whole husband/heroin-trafficker thing.

Albo is popular but only slightly younger than me - by the next election he will be thinking more about retirement than moving into the Lodge. Maybe he's a sucker for punishment and wants to give it a go but 3 years is a long time in opposition - especially after spending the past 6 years there.

Joel Fitzgibbon is considering - he might be worth a go - he's not a star but he's also not offensive.

Tony Bourke can be a tosser but also a decent bloke. I've had a bit to do with him. Plays a bit of guitar and likes the same music as me - can't be all bad.

Penny Wong has already said she won't move to the lower house - that's good, I don't like her either.

It's time they faced the realisation the tactics and personnel of the past 6 years aren't the right people to win government. Rip off the band-aid and get some new blood in there. Falling back on Bowen or Plebisek would be disastrous. As much as I voted Libs this time around it would be nice to have a genuine, moderate alternative for next time.

The quality of a government will always be related to the quality of the opposition.

Pretty close to my opinion as well, although you forgot with Tony Bourke that basketball lovers will get easily confused and think they are voting for Andrew Gaze.

Jason Clare or Andre Leigh would be other options.  Labor actually has more alternative leaders than the Libs do at this stage so all is not loss.  Figure out who they are, scrap the deals with the extremists and anything is possible in 3 years time

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14 minutes ago, trinube said:

Stock market seems happy - up over 100pts - 1.6%

Naturally 

The prospect of a Labor government is like kryptonite to financial markets 

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2 minutes ago, Cottoneyes said:

Jason Clare or Andre Leigh would be other options.  Labor actually has more alternative leaders than the Libs do at this stage so all is not loss.  Figure out who they are, scrap the deals with the extremists and anything is possible in 3 years time

Yeah, I forgot about Jason Clare - surprising given he's my local member and I've played golf with him a few times :)

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2 hours ago, trinube said:

I agree. I know a few people who are 'professional students' - they have an alphabet of letters after their name but have never actually worked other than serving coffees in the Uni cafe. Perhaps there needs to be a restriction that once you've done a degree you need to work at least 2 years in that field before you can enrol for a new,  unrelated degree. You can still do it, but you pay up front.

2 things for this:

1. No one should go to uni without some real life experience first.  Mature age students tend to do much better without the flip flopping between courses which in the long run saves alot of tax payers money (and lost opportunities for others).  You want to be an accountant - go work in a business and understand how they work so your studies mean more.  You want to be a doctor - go be an orderly in the hospital so you see what the coalface is like (and lose your god complex if you have one).  You want to be an engineer - go figure out what you are expecting the mechanics to put up with from your decisions before going onto study.

2. Why are degrees so expensive?  Why do unis need to exist in the real world with expensive real estate and buildings.  Granted some sciences need the land, but what business, arts or humanities degree couldn't be done online or out of the physical classroom? 

Then I could also go on about the lack of quality in lecturers who have never been in the real world, but hey, bring in point 1 above and this problem will drop off in a generation

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25 minutes ago, Cottoneyes said:

2 things for this:

1. No one should go to uni without some real life experience first.

2. Why are degrees so expensive?

Excellent points.

On point 1, and as Katz alluded to earlier, I think a lot of people end up in Uni because they have no idea what they want to do.

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6 minutes ago, trinube said:

Excellent points.

On point 1, and as Katz alluded to earlier, I think a lot of people end up in Uni because they have no idea what they want to do.

That was me, hence I got nearly three years though & decided it wasn't for me.

Throw in a few years working for a living, and I decided an Engineering degree in the field I was working in was:

1/ going to keep me interested in the study

2/ likely to land me a better job in a field I knew I could do OK in.

It did both.

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10 minutes ago, trinube said:

Excellent points.

On point 1, and as Katz alluded to earlier, I think a lot of people end up in Uni because they have no idea what they want to do.

So they end up with a PhD in gender fluidity and expect the rest of us to pick up the tab

If the name of a degree ends in 'studies' chances are it will be completely useless and should therefore not be funded by the taxpayer

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I have degrees in, Software stuff, Project Management and a BA in History, Sociology and English. The BA has been the most useful degree of the three. I have worked in the SW and Project stuff all my working life and the BA is the most valuable.

BA was HECS, my employers funded the other two as it built business capability

Edited by BarryBevan

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6 hours ago, Peter said:

I've gotta say, I didnt think our country was this close in voting.

image.png.aa1982b275710d0eab0ee7ed39a25f58.png

Do you have the greens to add to that.

Then Palmer?

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2 hours ago, Ex-Hasbeen said:

I paid mine up front as I went. I studied part time, and there was still a 30% discount for paying up front. Considering I was already way over the threshold, and would have paid most of each semester off before the end of it, it was a no-brainer.

I did the same

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Quote

I have degrees in, Software stuff, Project Management

 

Jeez you can a a full degree in Proj Mgt?  Thats a lot of gannt chart viewing over 3 years 😂😂😂

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If you think of our PM's from BOTH sides over the last 40 years that BOTH sides like... it Hawke.    Sco Mo channelled Hawke and got a few back to scrape what i assume will be a working majority with a speaker included.   He went from looking like a bloke that had never held a beer to a professional beer holder in 4 weeks.

Albo is the only one that can win Govt for the ALP. 

He is the only one that get in the gutter like Abbott.  He is the only one that seems human.

If sco mo survives three years it will be election of sco mo as a good bloke v ?????   .  That question mark can only be Albo.  I'm not saying whether he can do the job or not but he is the only one that can win it for them, the only one that can out do "good bloke" sco mo...... and they wouldn't dare pick on his mum....lol

 

 

Edited by Oompa Loompa

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3 hours ago, IronJimbo said:

Naturally 

The prospect of a Labor government is like kryptonite to financial markets 

I am still in disbelief that people thought Labor would win.... I mean every financial expert said it would be bad for the economy and post election (today) they are all saying we have dodged a bullet.

Now keep in mind.... Shorten also kept talking about an experienced cabinet..... ie: Plibersek, Albanese, Shorten, Bowen and Wong etc....... I mean seriously....... these were the idiots (except Albo) who reined during the Rudd/Gillard years.

And the arrogance of Shorten. Sent an acceptance tweet to media outlets Saturday afternoon for there Sunday papers........ and last week emailed Morrison to set up meetings to ensure a smooth transition of government..........no wonder the bloke seemed so shell shocked.

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5 hours ago, trinube said:

Albo is popular but only slightly younger than me - by the next election he will be thinking more about retirement than moving into the Lodge. Maybe he's a sucker for punishment and wants to give it a go but 3 years is a long time in opposition - especially after spending the past 6 years there.

Albo is 56. He won't even be 60 by the next election. You talk as if he's as old as Trump or Sanders.

Surprisingly, Australia has only had three PMs initially take office after turning 60, and they've all been from the coalition. McEwen for only a few weeks in a caretaker capacity following Holt's death, McMahon and Turnbull.

 

Edited by Paul Every

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4 minutes ago, Paul Every said:

Albo is 56. He won't even be 60 by the next election. You talk as if he's as old as Trump or Sanders.

Not all all, my point is that he's been in Parliament for 23 years already and it will be 27 years by the time the next election comes around. He may be a political masochist but I'd be surprised if he wants to continue on given the time he's already been in office. He's already had a relationship recently fail and I'm not sure he will want to continue sacrificing when his immediate future is 3 years in opposition.

I may be completely wrong, it's just a gut feeling.

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9 hours ago, dazaau said:

I don't get people whinging about university fees etc. You don't pay up front. You don't have to go to university. 60 per cent of your fees are paid for by other peoples taxes. WHAT MORE DO PEOPLE WANT.

I "hate" paying my HECS back, but I'm earning a lot more than I would have without my degree so I'm happy to pay, after all, I benefit more from my education than anyone else - and I'm only paying for 40% of it! What could be fairer (apart from me paying for more of it perhaps)? 

If you want to work as a Physio you HAVE TO study at Uni.

Work hard through school, score 98 or 99 in your HSC (ie top 1% of the state) and you can get straight in as an undergrad. This costs you around $40,000 and the commonwealth supports you (CSP). Not a bad deal

Say you get 95. You didn;t work hard enough, but the job market needs more Physios. the Unis will let you do an Undergrad course, say Exercise Science. That costs you $18,000 and the commonwealth once again supports you. you could stop there and do important work helping promote health and disease through exercise interventions. If you are hell bent on being a Physio the Unis happily offer you a 2 year Masters in Physiotherapy, the government doesn't support these Masters degrees as they are for high flying corprorate types so that costs you $42,000 a year. (and you spend more than half the time doing "clinical placements" where you essentially work for free in the public health system while paying hecs for the privilege)

So our lazy Physio has now a neat $100,000 Uni debt and has been studying 5 years at University to earn the right to be registered to do their job. They earn 62-69,000 in the public health service in NSW as a 1st year grad, and the communists who run public health pay you the same as a music therapist or play therapist.

I am not a vice chancellor so don;t have the stats on Undergrad vs Masters qualified places, and the cynic would assume it's a massive Uni cash-grab, like the Singapore Physio cohorts they enrol as a separate course in the same facility, but I haven't seen an undergrad qualified Physio apply for work with me in the last 10 years at least. every kid I start has $80-100,000 around their neck before they work a day. Their tradie mates have bought a van down the coast, ski boat or first flat by then if they're smart.

Edited by Parkside
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1 hour ago, IronmanFoz said:

 

And the arrogance of Shorten. Sent an acceptance tweet to media outlets Saturday afternoon for there Sunday papers........ and last week emailed Morrison to set up meetings to ensure a smooth transition of government..........no wonder the bloke seemed so shell shocked.

But, but the liberals...

(Oh, we're not going with that argument still?)

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10 minutes ago, Parkside said:

If you want to work as a Physio you HAVE TO study at Uni.

Work hard through school, score 98 or 99 in your HSC (ie top 1% of the state) and you can get straight in as an undergrad. This costs you around $40,000 and the commonwealth supports you (CSP). Not a bad deal

Say you get 95. You didn;t work hard enough, but the job market needs more Physios. the Unis will let you do an Undergrad course, say Exercise Science. That costs you $18,000 and the commonwealth once again supports you. you could stop there and do important work helping promote health and disease through exercise interventions. If you are hell bent on being a Physio the Unis happily offer you a 2 year Masters in Physiotherapy, the government doesn't support these Masters degrees as they are for high flying corprorate types so that costs you $42,000 a year. (and you spend more than half the time doing "clinical placements" where you essentially work for free in the public health system while paying hecs for the privilege)

So our lazy Physio has now a neat $100,000 Uni debt and has been studying 5 years at University to earn the right to be registered to do their job. They earn 62-69,000 in the public health service in NSW as a 1st year grad, and the communists who run public health pay you the same as a music therapist or play therapist.

I am not a vice chancellor so don;t have the stats on Undergrad vs Masters qualified places, and the cynic would assume it's a massive Uni cash-grab, like the Singapore Physio cohorts they enrol as a separate course in the same facility, but I haven't seen an undergrad qualified Physio apply for work with me in the last 10 years at least. every kid I start has $80-100,000 around their neck before they work a day. Their tradie mates have bought a van down the coast, ski boat or first flat by then if they're smart.

That's one pathway, another would be to give up on going to the University of Sydney or Melbourne and start out at a lower uni and/or lower course. Then you change unis/degrees when you prove yourself to be good. May take longer.

But I see what you are saying, but this is mostly an allocation problem.

I do despise the way atar is used to allocate limited course numbers. Just because atar is high doesn't mean the course is hard, just popular and limited. 

 

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54 minutes ago, Paul Every said:

Albo is 56. He won't even be 60 by the next election. You talk as if he's as old as Trump or Sanders.

Surprisingly, Australia has only had three PMs initially take office after turning 60, and they've all been from the coalition. McEwen for only a few weeks in a caretaker capacity following Holt's death, McMahon and Turnbull.

 

Holt didn't die, picked up in a Chinese sub.  Came back to Australia October long weekend, 2016.

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22 minutes ago, Parkside said:

If you want to work as a Physio you HAVE TO study at Uni.

Work hard through school, score 98 or 99 in your HSC (ie top 1% of the state) and you can get straight in as an undergrad. This costs you around $40,000 and the commonwealth supports you (CSP). Not a bad deal

Say you get 95. You didn;t work hard enough, but the job market needs more Physios. the Unis will let you do an Undergrad course, say Exercise Science. That costs you $18,000 and the commonwealth once again supports you. you could stop there and do important work helping promote health and disease through exercise interventions. If you are hell bent on being a Physio the Unis happily offer you a 2 year Masters in Physiotherapy, the government doesn't support these Masters degrees as they are for high flying corprorate types so that costs you $42,000 a year. (and you spend more than half the time doing "clinical placements" where you essentially work for free in the public health system while paying hecs for the privilege)

So our lazy Physio has now a neat $100,000 Uni debt and has been studying 5 years at University to earn the right to be registered to do their job. They earn 62-69,000 in the public health service in NSW as a 1st year grad, and the communists who run public health pay you the same as a music therapist or play therapist.

I am not a vice chancellor so don;t have the stats on Undergrad vs Masters qualified places, and the cynic would assume it's a massive Uni cash-grab, like the Singapore Physio cohorts they enrol as a separate course in the same facility, but I haven't seen an undergrad qualified Physio apply for work with me in the last 10 years at least. every kid I start has $80-100,000 around their neck before they work a day. Their tradie mates have bought a van down the coast, ski boat or first flat by then if they're smart.

That's an interesting read.

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27 minutes ago, Parkside said:

If you want to work as a Physio you HAVE TO study at Uni.

Work hard through school, score 98 or 99 in your HSC (ie top 1% of the state) and you can get straight in as an undergrad. This costs you around $40,000 and the commonwealth supports you (CSP). Not a bad deal

Say you get 95. You didn;t work hard enough, but the job market needs more Physios. the Unis will let you do an Undergrad course, say Exercise Science. That costs you $18,000 and the commonwealth once again supports you. you could stop there and do important work helping promote health and disease through exercise interventions. If you are hell bent on being a Physio the Unis happily offer you a 2 year Masters in Physiotherapy, the government doesn't support these Masters degrees as they are for high flying corprorate types so that costs you $42,000 a year. (and you spend more than half the time doing "clinical placements" where you essentially work for free in the public health system while paying hecs for the privilege)

So our lazy Physio has now a neat $100,000 Uni debt and has been studying 5 years at University to earn the right to be registered to do their job. They earn 62-69,000 in the public health service in NSW as a 1st year grad, and the communists who run public health pay you the same as a music therapist or play therapist.

I am not a vice chancellor so don;t have the stats on Undergrad vs Masters qualified places, and the cynic would assume it's a massive Uni cash-grab, like the Singapore Physio cohorts they enrol as a separate course in the same facility, but I haven't seen an undergrad qualified Physio apply for work with me in the last 10 years at least. every kid I start has $80-100,000 around their neck before they work a day. Their tradie mates have bought a van down the coast, ski boat or first flat by then if they're smart.

no offence, but Australia voted against this type of society on the weekend.  Probably should up the charges to full user pays and maybe get some more handouts for the baby boomer generation like franking thing.... maybe if you own a house, over 65, you get $20k handout.

have no idea how the rest of the world works, but i hate to be a kid these days... seems if your over 65, youre laughin,  even get welfare if you own shares and pay no tax like above, but if your 18 - 25 your stuffed, and thats just with the price of somewhere to live before you get into choices around the rest of your life

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7 hours ago, Oompa Loompa said:

no offence, but Australia voted against this type of society on the weekend.  Probably should up the charges to full user pays and maybe get some more handouts for the baby boomer generation like franking thing.... maybe if you own a house, over 65, you get $20k handout.

have no idea how the rest of the world works, but i hate to be a kid these days... seems if your over 65, youre laughin,  even get welfare if you own shares and pay no tax like above, but if your 18 - 25 your stuffed, and thats just with the price of somewhere to live before you get into choices around the rest of your life

Everything outside your house is paid for by tax rates etc. Why should my tax subsidise some person with a huge incomes capital gain. Or tax refund when they paid no tax.

Shorty's message was okay he was a lame campaigner who could not cut through. Andrew Leigh is pretty good and should put hat in plus he ra a 118 half marathon last year and gassed me at a 10 k

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8 hours ago, Oompa Loompa said:

seems if your over 65, youre laughin,  even get welfare if you own shares and pay no tax like above

:lol: Yeah so under Labor if you're in the small minority of self managed super funds you pay the tax already paid by the company giving you the dividend but if you're in an Industry fund you don't. 

 

Real smart.

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3 minutes ago, nealo said:

:lol: Yeah so under Labor if you're in the small minority of self managed super funds you pay the tax already paid by the company giving you the dividend but if you're in an Industry fund you don't. 

 

Real smart.

They're self managed. Change the make-up so it doesn't happen.

PD sprouted that this policy would cost pensioners up to $20,000 a year. Does anybody realise that for it to cost $20K a year, you'd have to have about $1.3M in shares, and be earning $70,000 a year in franked dividends. Do these people really get a pension?

Edited by Ex-Hasbeen

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9 hours ago, Parkside said:

If you want to work as a Physio you HAVE TO study at Uni.

Work hard through school, score 98 or 99 in your HSC (ie top 1% of the state) and you can get straight in as an undergrad. This costs you around $40,000 and the commonwealth supports you (CSP). Not a bad deal

Say you get 95. You didn;t work hard enough, but the job market needs more Physios. the Unis will let you do an Undergrad course, say Exercise Science. That costs you $18,000 and the commonwealth once again supports you. you could stop there and do important work helping promote health and disease through exercise interventions. If you are hell bent on being a Physio the Unis happily offer you a 2 year Masters in Physiotherapy, the government doesn't support these Masters degrees as they are for high flying corprorate types so that costs you $42,000 a year. (and you spend more than half the time doing "clinical placements" where you essentially work for free in the public health system while paying hecs for the privilege)

So our lazy Physio has now a neat $100,000 Uni debt and has been studying 5 years at University to earn the right to be registered to do their job. They earn 62-69,000 in the public health service in NSW as a 1st year grad, and the communists who run public health pay you the same as a music therapist or play therapist.

I am not a vice chancellor so don;t have the stats on Undergrad vs Masters qualified places, and the cynic would assume it's a massive Uni cash-grab, like the Singapore Physio cohorts they enrol as a separate course in the same facility, but I haven't seen an undergrad qualified Physio apply for work with me in the last 10 years at least. every kid I start has $80-100,000 around their neck before they work a day. Their tradie mates have bought a van down the coast, ski boat or first flat by then if they're smart.

This was me, except for the 'lazy' part. I enrolled in the Master of Physio after doing a handful of other degrees in a different field. I was hoping for a move into what I thought would be a more fulfilling career. I chose the Masters, I could have done UG as I'd applied for both and was offered both, but chose it because it was a shorter course, and the time of graduation (April rather than the end of the year with the UGs) meant there would be less competition for jobs. I almost finished it, but decided it wasn't a good fit for me. Sadly costing me a bomb in the process.

I agree it's a massive cash grab. There was barely anything different between the Masters students and UGs. We were in the same classes almost all of the time, with the exception of the intensive program we started with in January before the UGs came back into second year. The main difference was the compressed program. While they were on holidays mid-semester and end of year, we were on placement. The demographics were international students, many SIngaporean, little rich kids who discovered their Exercise Science degree wasn't going to let them be a physo for [insert sporting team], and me, pretty much.

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33 minutes ago, nealo said:

:lol: Yeah so under Labor if you're in the small minority of self managed super funds you pay the tax already paid by the company giving you the dividend but if you're in an Industry fund you don't. 

 

Real smart.

It's almost as if they wanted to make industry funds more popular

I wonder why...

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45 minutes ago, Ex-Hasbeen said:

They're self managed. Change the make-up so it doesn't happen.

PD sprouted that this policy would cost pensioners up to $20,000 a year. Does anybody realise that for it to cost $20K a year, you'd have to have about $1.3M in shares, and be earning $70,000 a year in franked dividends. Do these people really get a pension?

Nothing to do with the pension. $1.3m isn't a lot of Super to live off. The Greens guy at my booth was going to lose 8k a year from his income of 60k. 

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8 minutes ago, dazaau said:

Nothing to do with the pension. $1.3m isn't a lot of Super to live off. The Greens guy at my booth was going to lose 8k a year from his income of 60k. 

But can you really get a pension if you have $1.3M and are getting $70K income? I might be in for an easier life than I thought in retirement.

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Just now, Ex-Hasbeen said:

But can you really get a pension if you have $1.3M and are getting $70K income? I might be in for an easier life than I thought in retirement.

I think I remember hearing all but the super rich get a "part pension" .

For the most part I think they are after the travel concessions and stuff rather than the token payment. 

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33 minutes ago, IronJimbo said:

It's almost as if they wanted to make industry funds more popular

I wonder why...

Any conflict interest for you

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