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ComfortablyNumb

Snake Tales

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Black-bellied Swamp Snake or sometimes known as Marsh Snake.

 

Venomous, but considered harmless. Generally fairly reluctant to bite, unless handled roughly. A defensive bite to your cat might result in local swelling and a bit of pain. They feed on lizards and frogs. They are a small snake, if it was much fatter than a pen it would have been an adult.

 

By the greyish colour I guess you are somewhere north of about Port to SE Qld and close to the coast or Dividing Range? They are commonly olive green around Sydney and in the southern part of their range.

 

Deep respekt.

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Black-bellied Swamp Snake or sometimes known as Marsh Snake.

 

Venomous, but considered harmless. Generally fairly reluctant to bite, unless handled roughly. A defensive bite to your cat might result in local swelling and a bit of pain. They feed on lizards and frogs. They are a small snake, if it was much fatter than a pen it would have been an adult.

 

By the greyish colour I guess you are somewhere north of about Port to SE Qld and close to the coast or Dividing Range? They are commonly olive green around Sydney and in the southern part of their range.

 

 

 

Just out of curiosity, for the uninitiated like me, where does your expertise come from? Would I be right in guessing it's your occupation and not a hobby (not to say that hobbyists cannot be more expert and knowledgeable than professionals)

 

There's not too much more that I loved as a kid than listening to a demonstration from one of the guys from the Australian Reptile Park or somewhere similar.

Edited by marnifer

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There's not too much more that I loved as a kid than listening to a demonstration from one of the guys from the Australian Reptile Park or somewhere similar.

 

 

Substitute Reptile Park for Taronga Zoo and you are pretty close to the mark although I think he said he had moved on.

 

We did a behind the scenes tour at Taronga a few years back, and they were showing us the feeding prep area for the reptiles and such. We ate some meal worms then they showed us this "liquid stuff" they feed the animals, and they said one of the staff had been using it for years during endurance events :shocking: , I think I know who he was talking about!

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By the greyish colour I guess you are somewhere north of about Port to SE Qld and close to the coast or Dividing Range?

 

 

Thommo, if you'd given him a better picture he probabiy could have figured out your address :lol:

Thanks Paul, always nice to hear an expert talking on any subject.

 

We did a behind the scenes tour at Taronga a few years back

 

 

Are those tours primarily set up for kids, or is there a grown-up version as well?

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Are those tours primarily set up for kids, or is there a grown-up version as well?

 

 

I think they cater for whoever is on the tour, it is usually only a small group, seems like it is mainly targeted at tourists. We had the only kids on our tour group of about 8.

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Are those tours primarily set up for kids, or is there a grown-up version as well?

 

we did "road and snore" recently at Taronga and it was all adults but it would be suitable for anyone.

 

we've also done it at dubbo and we were the only 2 on the tour!

 

http://taronga.org.au/roarandsnore

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Calling Paul Every for snake identification.

I walked right over this puppy while guiding a client y'day.  He was behind me and very calmly stopped and said "hey Dave, what type of snake do you reckon that is that you just walked on" :lol:

Brown?  Tiger? Whatever, he just sat there with his head up and tongue flickering at me while I tried to get close enough with the GoPro to get a decent pic.  I'm a bit of s snake fan really, think they are great critters.

 

 

 

 

SnakeStill.jpg

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Our neighbour posted this shot of 2 x browns right beside the path we take our dog on every morning. I'll pay a bit more attention in future.

Image may contain: outdoor

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On 10/29/2017 at 6:36 AM, ComfortablyNumb said:

Calling Paul Every for snake identification.

I walked right over this puppy while guiding a client y'day.  He was behind me and very calmly stopped and said "hey Dave, what type of snake do you reckon that is that you just walked on" :lol:

Brown?  Tiger? Whatever, he just sat there with his head up and tongue flickering at me while I tried to get close enough with the GoPro to get a decent pic.  I'm a bit of s snake fan really, think they are great critters.

 

 

 

 

SnakeStill.jpg

Copperhead or Tiger.

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Bumped into this little fella a few weeks ago, only about 2 foot long. Apparently a Broad Headed snake, venomous and endangered. Always like snakes, use to catch them when I was a kid. Apparently a bit smarter now :lol:

 

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18 hours ago, Stem said:

Bumped into this little fella a few weeks ago, only about 2 foot long. Apparently a Broad Headed snake, venomous and endangered. Always like snakes, use to catch them when I was a kid. Apparently a bit smarter now :lol:

 

Image may contain: outdoor

Adult at that size.

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On 11/4/2017 at 4:43 PM, Paul Every said:

Copperhead or Tiger.

Thanks Paul

I'm thinking I need to carry an EPIRP, as getting bitten down in there would be a problem.

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Where are you CN?

Although an epirb is a reasonable precaution, a couple of bandages and knowing appropriate first aid are the most important things.

That and leaving snakes alone. The overwhelming majority of bites are experienced by those trying to kill, catch or keep snakes.

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8 minutes ago, Paul Every said:

Where are you CN?

Although an epirb is a reasonable precaution, a couple of bandages and knowing appropriate first aid are the most important things.

That and leaving snakes alone. The overwhelming majority of bites are experienced by those trying to kill, catch or keep snakes.

This was out near Point Lookout near Ebor.  I carry a bandage in my fishing vest to wrap tightly over a bite and up the limb.  For this one, we were in a patch of dense bush, would take about 10mins to get back to the car, then another 10mins to get back to a farm house.  Not sure what would be the best thing to do if someone was bitten in a spot like that - apply bandage and walk them back to the car, then phone for ambulance?  Or have them stay put and go to car and phone ambulance?  Or walk them to car and drive for 70mins to Armidale hospital?  i.e. how much mobility can you risk with the patient bitten by a brown or tiger or copperhead?

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