Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
ComfortablyNumb

Snake Tales

Recommended Posts

Seems Mrs T is sharing her workplace with a very large brown snake - 5 metres the cleaner reckons (I'm wondering if she means 5 feet? Do browns get to 5m?).

 

Anyhow, the cleaner opened up one of the old store rooms y'day and found shedded snake skin everywhere, then spotted one huge mother of a brown snake. She yelled at the boss & owner of said premises to grab a shovel.

 

He came back with a Tupperware container :blink:

 

Cleaner says to him "what the f*ck am I going to do with that - give it a wash"? :lol:

 

By now, the snake has disappeared into a hole somewhere. The snake catcher comes around and says too late, it's gone, & it's probably got a nest of babies in here amongst all the junk.

 

So they move a few boxes............into Mrs T's office :shock:

 

Ah Happy Dayz.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So a bit bigger than this one I was playing with on the weekend?

 

 

 

Good thing you posted the right photo...

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Its real! My wifes nephew is a reptile nut, think its a corn snake, also has a white one.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yeah, 5ft sounds closer to the mark. Biggest venomous snake is the King Cobra that gets to about 6m. Don't quote me but Browns will usually get to 3-3.5m, still pretty bloody big and I'd rather run into a 6m King Cobra than a 3m brown.

 

Used to do a bit of work with a botanical garden that had some snakes. Had a mate reach into a cage to to grab one of them out (Pacific Boa), she was a little concerned as she had to reach past a bitey one to get a nice one. Just as she got close to bitey I grabbed her shoulders, she jumped, snake jumped and we thought she got tagged and bitey went to the other side of the enclosure. On closer inspection she'd actually been tagged 3 separate times, pretty impressive considering they are a supposedly slowish striking snake.

 

Lenny.jpg

One of mine, spending some quality time on the stationary trainer!

Edited by 0psi

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Its real! My wifes nephew is a reptile nut, think its a corn snake, also has a white one.

 

 

Yes, Corn Snake.

 

I can't understand why someone would keep one.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Was outside my shed ripping some ply down for a job. A little field mouse came hooping by, a couple of feet from me. Said to myself, 'hey, look at that little mouse'. Then said, 'hey, look at that brown snake chasing it'. Scared the shit out of me, and it disappeared into some short grass in the yard. I mean short grass, and it was out of sight.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yeah, 5ft sounds closer to the mark. Biggest venomous snake is the King Cobra that gets to about 6m. Don't quote me but Browns will usually get to 3-3.5m, still pretty bloody big and I'd rather run into a 6m King Cobra than a 3m brown.

 

Used to do a bit of work with a botanical garden that had some snakes. Had a mate reach into a cage to to grab one of them out (Pacific Boa), she was a little concerned as she had to reach past a bitey one to get a nice one. Just as she got close to bitey I grabbed her shoulders, she jumped, snake jumped and we thought she got tagged and bitey went to the other side of the enclosure. On closer inspection she'd actually been tagged 3 separate times, pretty impressive considering they are a supposedly slowish striking snake.

 

 

2 metres would be considered a large Brown.

 

Pacific Boas are an ambush predator with the strike that is obviously fast enough to nab whatever they feed on, so nailing something as large and slow moving as a looming human hand isn't going to be too difficult. They certainly can be snappy little snakes, and being non-venomous and fairly small, it is not too surprising that someone working with them has had a few "love bites".

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Was outside my shed ripping some ply down for a job. A little field mouse came hooping by, a couple of feet from me. Said to myself, 'hey, look at that little mouse'. Then said, 'hey, look at that brown snake chasing it'. Scared the shit out of me, and it disappeared into some short grass in the yard. I mean short grass, and it was out of sight.

 

 

Browns are one of the few snakes that have evolved to hunt rodents by day in relatively open environments, consequently they have a fast and highly accurate strike.

 

When I hear stories of inexperienced people wanting to kill them, (such as recounted by the OP), I shudder at how it may turn out. Try to kill any animal and it will fight for its life.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

Browns are one of the few snakes that have evolved to hunt rodents by day in relatively open environments, consequently they have a fast and highly accurate strike.

 

When I hear stories of inexperienced people wanting to kill them, (such as recounted by the OP), I shudder at how it may turn out. Try to kill any animal and it will fight for its life.

 

 

I don't like to kill them. Our daughters stoopid cat brought another one into our courtyard last week, still very much alive. We grabbed the cat away & I put pushed the snake into a bucket with a broom and let it go up in the back corner of our yard - it went across the the neighbours. Not sure what sort of snake, got some pics somewhere, will post later for ther snake experts to try to ID.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

Yes, Corn Snake.

 

I can't understand why someone would keep one.

 

 

Seemed like a nice docile kind of pet, why would you not want to keep one Paul?

 

This fella snuck into my garage while I was building a bike last week.

 

2017165590101159333S600x600Q85.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My grandfather came across a brown snake basking in the sun between a couple of sheets fo that clear corrugated plastic roofing stuff that had been stacked on the ground for ages. He quickly jumped on top of the stack pinning the snake underneath the top sheet and was there for the next hour, calling out for someone to come and help him.

 

Obviously had time to think while he was standing there about the best way to kill it (he was an old farmer from way back and in his eyes, the only good snake was a dead snake) - as soon as I heard his calls and came running, he asked for a hammer and large nail. A couple of taps, through the top sheet and then right through the centre of its head had it sorted...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Don't get me started on snakes - with the flooding twice here in the last four months they have been everywhere. I have seen plenty when running and riding. Christmas day my neighbour had one in his back patio that decided to hide in the back of a fridge - that was interesting. Had one a few weeks ago in my back verandah - red belly - he hid between the concrete and fence and dissapeared - two days later appeared in the neighbours front yard a bit dopey as I had buried the sucker under the concrete but he still managed to get out.

 

Came across the following vid when searching Wee Waa on you tube a few weeks back:

 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Pacific Boas are an ambush predator with the strike that is obviously fast enough to nab whatever they feed on, so nailing something as large and slow moving as a looming human hand isn't going to be too difficult. They certainly can be snappy little snakes, and being non-venomous and fairly small, it is not too surprising that someone working with them has had a few "love bites".

 

 

Yup, no suprise there. What was suprising was 3 separate bites, one mid index finger, one about the base of the index finger/thumb and another on the end of her thumb. Pretty impressive when it looked (and I'm told felt) like one strike. Wasn't till the little dots of blood started to appear that we realised she'd be hit 3 times. Still beats getting hit by a 'chewer', that $h*t hurts.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

Seemed like a nice docile kind of pet, why would you not want to keep one Paul?

 

This fella snuck into my garage while I was building a bike last week.

 

2017165590101159333S600x600Q85.jpg

 

 

Always great to have Bluies around. :smile1:

 

As for Corn Snakes, yes they are docile, easy feeders, attractive, but as a highly adaptable US species it's probably only a matter of time before they become another unwanted feral. It need only take one escaped female in almost anywhere in Aust and they will establish in the wild. Females can store viable sperm for over 5 years after mating before laying fertile eggs.

 

We have already seen the importation of one destructive snake disease in Australia (Inclusion Body Disease) through the importation of snakes from the US.

 

Outside of the legality and potential environmental impacts, if National Parks were aware of him keeping exotics, the corn snakes and everything else in his collection would be euthanased for quarantine reasons. All for the sake of keeping the US snake equivilent of a goldfish!

 

Why anyone who loves snakes would support an illegal trade in exotic reptiles when there are so many attractive and interesting native species to keep legally is beyond me.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

I don't like to kill them. Our daughters stoopid cat brought another one into our courtyard last week, still very much alive. We grabbed the cat away & I put pushed the snake into a bucket with a broom and let it go up in the back corner of our yard - it went across the the neighbours. Not sure what sort of snake, got some pics somewhere, will post later for ther snake experts to try to ID.

 

 

Post your pics and where you live and I'll have a shot at an ID.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yeah I like having the blueys around, although initially I only spotted the tail disappearing under a cupboard which gave me a fright :lol:

 

I will have a stern word to the nephew, didnt know he wasnt supposed to have them, I know he has a license but he can generally have his judgement clouded by "pretty things".

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I grew up backing onto the national park. We used to get snakes swimming in our pool from time to time. We also had one come into our entrance that resulted in a broken floor tile courtesy of a spade. I now can't stand snakes!

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

Post your pics and where you live and I'll have a shot at an ID.

 

 

Here you go Paul, not the best pics i'm afraid.

 

 

Snake3.jpg

 

Snake3close.jpg

 

Snake1Close.jpg

Edited by Thommo227

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Black-bellied Swamp Snake or sometimes known as Marsh Snake.

 

Venomous, but considered harmless. Generally fairly reluctant to bite, unless handled roughly. A defensive bite to your cat might result in local swelling and a bit of pain. They feed on lizards and frogs. They are a small snake, if it was much fatter than a pen it would have been an adult.

 

By the greyish colour I guess you are somewhere north of about Port to SE Qld and close to the coast or Dividing Range? They are commonly olive green around Sydney and in the southern part of their range.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

Lenny.jpg

One of mine, spending some quality time on the stationary trainer!

 

 

0psi, that's a good looking Bluey. Recently sloughed and well fed by the look of it.

 

Because they are such familar lizards, it is easy to forget how groovy they are. Bold patterning and colouration, cute tongue, laid back temperament.....and surprisingly aero!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Black-bellied Swamp Snake or sometimes known as Marsh Snake.

 

Venomous, but considered harmless. Generally fairly reluctant to bite, unless handled roughly. A defensive bite to your cat might result in local swelling and a bit of pain. They feed on lizards and frogs. They are a small snake, if it was much fatter than a pen it would have been an adult.

 

By the greyish colour I guess you are somewhere north of about Port to SE Qld and close to the coast or Dividing Range? They are commonly olive green around Sydney and in the southern part of their range.

 

 

Thanks Paul. We live in Armidale, right on top of Dividing Range. It was a fair bit fatter than a pen, so an adult.

 

Interestingly, the stoopid cat got very sore around the base of the tail a few weeks ago, had to take her to the vet as she wouldn't move, had a huge spew one night and not eating much, so perhaps she got bitten on the butt! Came good after a painkiller/Ab shot and not moving much for a few days.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've only had one snake experience in Oz and it was on a motorbike. Girlfriend and I were having a great weekend up at Catherine Hill Bay and staying at Caves Beach. Went to the CHB pub for lunch on a sunny Saturday, riding back to Caves on the road that joins CHB to the main road, cranked over in a corner I saw a black coloured snake sliding across the road. It reared up and I had a decision to make, head straight for it or risk dumping the Ducati Darmah in the bushes as the gap was closing between the snake and the edge of the road. I head for the snake, just brushed it with my knee, no harm, no foul and saw it slither away in the mirrors. It faired better than this fella at Sepang in 98.

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Black-bellied Swamp Snake or sometimes known as Marsh Snake.

 

Venomous, but considered harmless. Generally fairly reluctant to bite, unless handled roughly. A defensive bite to your cat might result in local swelling and a bit of pain. They feed on lizards and frogs. They are a small snake, if it was much fatter than a pen it would have been an adult.

 

By the greyish colour I guess you are somewhere north of about Port to SE Qld and close to the coast or Dividing Range? They are commonly olive green around Sydney and in the southern part of their range.

 

Deep respekt.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Black-bellied Swamp Snake or sometimes known as Marsh Snake.

 

Venomous, but considered harmless. Generally fairly reluctant to bite, unless handled roughly. A defensive bite to your cat might result in local swelling and a bit of pain. They feed on lizards and frogs. They are a small snake, if it was much fatter than a pen it would have been an adult.

 

By the greyish colour I guess you are somewhere north of about Port to SE Qld and close to the coast or Dividing Range? They are commonly olive green around Sydney and in the southern part of their range.

 

 

 

Just out of curiosity, for the uninitiated like me, where does your expertise come from? Would I be right in guessing it's your occupation and not a hobby (not to say that hobbyists cannot be more expert and knowledgeable than professionals)

 

There's not too much more that I loved as a kid than listening to a demonstration from one of the guys from the Australian Reptile Park or somewhere similar.

Edited by marnifer

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

There's not too much more that I loved as a kid than listening to a demonstration from one of the guys from the Australian Reptile Park or somewhere similar.

 

 

Substitute Reptile Park for Taronga Zoo and you are pretty close to the mark although I think he said he had moved on.

 

We did a behind the scenes tour at Taronga a few years back, and they were showing us the feeding prep area for the reptiles and such. We ate some meal worms then they showed us this "liquid stuff" they feed the animals, and they said one of the staff had been using it for years during endurance events :shocking: , I think I know who he was talking about!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

By the greyish colour I guess you are somewhere north of about Port to SE Qld and close to the coast or Dividing Range?

 

 

Thommo, if you'd given him a better picture he probabiy could have figured out your address :lol:

Thanks Paul, always nice to hear an expert talking on any subject.

 

We did a behind the scenes tour at Taronga a few years back

 

 

Are those tours primarily set up for kids, or is there a grown-up version as well?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

Are those tours primarily set up for kids, or is there a grown-up version as well?

 

 

I think they cater for whoever is on the tour, it is usually only a small group, seems like it is mainly targeted at tourists. We had the only kids on our tour group of about 8.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Are those tours primarily set up for kids, or is there a grown-up version as well?

 

we did "road and snore" recently at Taronga and it was all adults but it would be suitable for anyone.

 

we've also done it at dubbo and we were the only 2 on the tour!

 

http://taronga.org.au/roarandsnore

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Calling Paul Every for snake identification.

I walked right over this puppy while guiding a client y'day.  He was behind me and very calmly stopped and said "hey Dave, what type of snake do you reckon that is that you just walked on" :lol:

Brown?  Tiger? Whatever, he just sat there with his head up and tongue flickering at me while I tried to get close enough with the GoPro to get a decent pic.  I'm a bit of s snake fan really, think they are great critters.

 

 

 

 

SnakeStill.jpg

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Our neighbour posted this shot of 2 x browns right beside the path we take our dog on every morning. I'll pay a bit more attention in future.

Image may contain: outdoor

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 10/29/2017 at 6:36 AM, ComfortablyNumb said:

Calling Paul Every for snake identification.

I walked right over this puppy while guiding a client y'day.  He was behind me and very calmly stopped and said "hey Dave, what type of snake do you reckon that is that you just walked on" :lol:

Brown?  Tiger? Whatever, he just sat there with his head up and tongue flickering at me while I tried to get close enough with the GoPro to get a decent pic.  I'm a bit of s snake fan really, think they are great critters.

 

 

 

 

SnakeStill.jpg

Copperhead or Tiger.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Bumped into this little fella a few weeks ago, only about 2 foot long. Apparently a Broad Headed snake, venomous and endangered. Always like snakes, use to catch them when I was a kid. Apparently a bit smarter now :lol:

 

Image may contain: outdoor

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
18 hours ago, Stem said:

Bumped into this little fella a few weeks ago, only about 2 foot long. Apparently a Broad Headed snake, venomous and endangered. Always like snakes, use to catch them when I was a kid. Apparently a bit smarter now :lol:

 

Image may contain: outdoor

Adult at that size.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 11/4/2017 at 4:43 PM, Paul Every said:

Copperhead or Tiger.

Thanks Paul

I'm thinking I need to carry an EPIRP, as getting bitten down in there would be a problem.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Where are you CN?

Although an epirb is a reasonable precaution, a couple of bandages and knowing appropriate first aid are the most important things.

That and leaving snakes alone. The overwhelming majority of bites are experienced by those trying to kill, catch or keep snakes.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 minutes ago, Paul Every said:

Where are you CN?

Although an epirb is a reasonable precaution, a couple of bandages and knowing appropriate first aid are the most important things.

That and leaving snakes alone. The overwhelming majority of bites are experienced by those trying to kill, catch or keep snakes.

This was out near Point Lookout near Ebor.  I carry a bandage in my fishing vest to wrap tightly over a bite and up the limb.  For this one, we were in a patch of dense bush, would take about 10mins to get back to the car, then another 10mins to get back to a farm house.  Not sure what would be the best thing to do if someone was bitten in a spot like that - apply bandage and walk them back to the car, then phone for ambulance?  Or have them stay put and go to car and phone ambulance?  Or walk them to car and drive for 70mins to Armidale hospital?  i.e. how much mobility can you risk with the patient bitten by a brown or tiger or copperhead?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×