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Softest lightest spongiest running shoes???

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there seem to be two types of runners, those you have tried Hoka's and love them and then there's those who haven't tried them and I'm in the tried and love them camp.

Just switching to the Stinson Evo Tarmac which is my third pair Hoka in two year.

 

just a side note, there's an article in the SMH about a 60 yr + couple who are running around Australia doing a marathon every day for 365 days.... and they are both in Vibram 5 fingers... oh well, horses for courses

http://www.smh.com.au/lifestyle/diet-and-fitness/inspired-or-insane-365-marathons-in-365-days-20130814-2rwq1.html

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They are pretty high up as in sole is quick thick - does rolling the ankle a concern for anyone ?

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just a side note, there's an article in the SMH about a 60 yr + couple who are running around Australia doing a marathon every day for 365 days.... and they are both in Vibram 5 fingers... oh well, horses for courses

 

I've got a $100 to say they don't make it - how stupid is that - in their 60s and running a marathon a day :scared:

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Yes, I'm still in love with the hokas. I've run more consistently in the last 6 months than I did for the previous 10 years. Did a half marathon pb recently. Definitely on the bandwagon.

Do you wear them for all your running? These must be quite a change from the minimalist approach you were taking - what is it in particular about the Hokas that you like?

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I think people need to understand that although they look very 'maximalist', Hokas are not a maximalist shoe in the traditional sense, like a Brooks Beast, Asics Kayano etc. That style usually have 16+mm drop, roll bars/anti pronation features, stiff mid sole, stiff heel cup and generally quite rigid to torsion and bending. Cushioning can be variable.

 

The Hokas are a new type of shoe that are very cushioned all the way from heel to forefoot, almost no drop (4mm)' and still quite light, have not motion control features, only one density of EVA foam, you can fold them in half and twist them pretty easiky and have only 4mm drop.

 

Running downhill in them is a pretty cool experience.

Edited by niseko

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I've got a $100 to say they don't make it - how stupid is that - in their 60s and running a marathon a day :scared:

 

AP, I'd have agreed with you on that but then I read the article... and they seem to be 2/3rds of the way araound... only 6 Vibrams to go...

 

"You wouldn't guess she and her husband, Alan, 68, are 30 kilometres into their 225th consecutive marathon around Australia

 

Read more: http://www.smh.com.au/lifestyle/diet-and-fitness/inspired-or-insane-365-marathons-in-365-days-20130814-2rwq1.html#ixzz2cYw3lk7c

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If you're looking for a really lightweight and soft race shoe, the Nike Lunaracers are magnificently soft and light. A lot of foam for such a light shoe.

You wear through the tread a bit fast, but they feel brilliant.

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I think people need to understand that although they look very 'maximalist', Hokas are not a maximalist shoe in the traditional sense, like a Brooks Beast, Asics Kayano etc. That style usually have 16+mm drop, roll bars/anti pronation features, stiff mid sole, stiff heel cup and generally quite rigid to torsion and bending. Cushioning can be variable.

 

 

 

Just for info. the latest ASICS Kayano have a 10mm drop. I recently bought a pair to try for long lazy runs. My pair weigh 315g - size US 10. They are quite nice actually - firm but enough cushioning and they are not aggressively correcting. A huge improvement from the Kayano "boots" of a few years ago. (I normally race in Mizuno Elixers)

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If you're looking for a really lightweight and soft race shoe, the Nike Lunaracers are magnificently soft and light. A lot of foam for such a light shoe.

You wear through the tread a bit fast, but they feel brilliant.

+1

 

I tried some Mizuno Sayonara recently...really nice, lightweight shoe.

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Does anyone use ON Cloudrunners? I have some and can't decide if I like them or not (I only jog nowadays anyway). They seem fine on the flat, but I feel less confident up and down hills in them. Early days though.

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Lunaracers sized similar to other Nike models?

all I can say is they fit the same as my Nike Zoom Kigers. Have no other recent experience with other Nike models.

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Love my Cloudracers but not too sure about the others. They do feel very different to my Brooks Pure Flows though.

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Lunaracers sized similar to other Nike models?

I know others have said differently, but I take 9.5 in pegasus, and 10.5 in the lunaracers. I tried the 9.5 & 10, and they were both too tight in the toes. (I do have reasonably wide feet)

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Do you wear them for all your running? These must be quite a change from the minimalist approach you were taking - what is it in particular about the Hokas that you like?

Hi CEM,

I had originally intended to take Niseko's approach and only do recovery runs or long runs in the Hokas, but I've found myself doing almost all my running in them just because I seem to pull up so much better the next day and the next 48 hours. I enjoyed the minimalist shoes (Merrell trail gloves are still my favourite shoe to pull on - even for on-road stuff), but my calves took a beating. (Literally: my massage guy had me almost in tears on a regular basis). I'd never understood people who talked about "recovery" runs - seriously, after a race my calves would be rocks (back when I was running in traditional shoes, and after my move to minimalist). But with the Hokas I could finally go for a gentle run the day after a race and feel *better* after 5-8km than when I started.

Also as noted, the Hokas are closer to a minimalist shoe than you might imagine. My criteria for running shoes are now: 1. Must be super-light (the lighter the better) 2. Must be negligible-drop (as close to zero as possible) 3. Must be able to lace snuggly around the middle of my foot, but not try to hold my toes together 4. Must not have some weird last that tries to control how I strike the ground.

I'll stick with minimalist shoes (Merrells) when I do speed work or try to race fast.... except that I do very little of either these days! eg. I did wear them for a sprint tri, the second run of the Qld duathlon, and for a couple of events at the Warwick pentath-run (x-country, hill climb, and 1500m), but for everything else (OD, half IM, half marathons, and most training runs), it's the clown shoes.

I'm sure there are other shoes out there now that meet some or all of my criteria above - but I've found something that works for me and I'm sticking with it!

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Nice one Wardy.

I went in today and tested a pair of Hokas. I have to say I was mighty impressed! So comfy and light. I felt I could get good spring on toe off and when the foot landed it felt super comfortable.

I even didn't get the shooting pain in my right shin from my stress fracture! (Another story)

4mm drop is on par with Kinvaras but there was so much more cushion on foot strike.

I will prob still race in my wave Ronins or Kinvaras but the Hokas will be great for long runs and recovery runs me thinks.

Unfortunately they didn't have the exact size I needed so ill be back in next week to buy a pair.

At well over double the cost of the shoes I've been wearing for the last few years it kinda hurts the pocket but I feel they will help get me running maras again sooner...

Time will tell

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Hey FP- I've been running in the ON Cloudsurfer for the past 6 months and love them. Initially only used them on hard surfaces but am now running trail with them.

Was running in the Asics DS Trainer prior to these- but the ON's are so much more responsive............

 

I was keen to try the Hoka's on recommendadtion from a friend who also has osteoporosis- but unfortunately my foot was too wide for them.

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Wardy, have you ever tried the Altra shoes? I liked them, but ended up with a pf issue that going back to a shoe with drop and more support in that area seemed to fix/relieve.

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Was going to start a new topic, then found this one.

I'm going to have one more attempt at returning to running next month & want to minimise the impact on my knees, esp. the left medial meniscus where 1/3rd was trimmed out.  My other wide-spread dual knee-symptoms have improved dramatically over 7yrs, but that area where the meniscus was trimmed is still a bit problematic (as I discovered with a 150m beach run to tag my wife in transition at Byron).

If this attempt fails, then I'll let it go & my wife & I will just do the team thing.

So what shoes would be best to minimise impact?  I did find this article - https://www.walkjogrun.net/best-shock-absorbing-running-shoes-reviewed/

Interesting the Brooks Ghost 11s come in 2nd.  I have Brooks Ghost 9s, and in the past always used Brooks shoes.

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7 minutes ago, ComfortablyNumb said:

Was going to start a new topic, then found this one.

I'm going to have one more attempt at returning to running next month & want to minimise the impact on my knees, esp. the left medial meniscus where 1/3rd was trimmed out.  My other wide-spread dual knee-symptoms have improved dramatically over 7yrs, but that area where the meniscus was trimmed is still a bit problematic (as I discovered with a 150m beach run to tag my wife in transition at Byron).

If this attempt fails, then I'll let it go & my wife & I will just do the team thing.

So what shoes would be best to minimise impact?  I did find this article - https://www.walkjogrun.net/best-shock-absorbing-running-shoes-reviewed/

Interesting the Brooks Ghost 11s come in 2nd.  I have Brooks Ghost 9s, and in the past always used Brooks shoes.

The Ghost 11 is 315 grams, pretty heavy. Same weight as my Hoka Stinsons, my first pair of Hokas. They saved my calves and AT and allowed me to run long pain free, but they weren't great to run in, heavy and clumpy. Maybe look at something cushioned by lightweight e.g Hoka Clayton about 40% lighter than the Ghost? Or Clifton?

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Just had a pair of Bondi 6's delivered from running warehouse.  Review here https://www.runningshoesguru.com/2018/09/hoka-one-one-bondi-6-review/

I think my 4th pair of Bondi's so will see how they go.  I have a detached medial cartledge in my right knee from a long ago soccer injury so make a lot of effort to look after my knees well. I also make sure around 1/2 of my running now is on trails to further lower the road impact.

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57 minutes ago, truck said:

I also make sure around 1/2 of my running now is on trails to further lower the road impact.

Anyone know how treadmill running compares to road or trail in terms of impact?

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18 minutes ago, ComfortablyNumb said:

Anyone know how treadmill running compares to road or trail in terms of impact?

It feels way less impactful to me - ymmv.

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1 hour ago, ComfortablyNumb said:

Anyone know how treadmill running compares to road or trail in terms of impact?

There seems to be a fair bit around that you can get RSI type injuries with too much of it due to there being no variation from step to step. Probably still better than running on a flat piece of road though if you can put up with the boredom factor 😂

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I'm thinking of starting with a very little on the treadmill (5x 1min jog/1min walk, 1-2x/week for 2-3 weeks), then moving outside to the grass with walk/run, then if all goes well building up to 4-5kms over 4mths (which might end up at 3min run/1min walk) and only ever running 4-5km non-stop in a race (once every 4-6wks).

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4 hours ago, ComfortablyNumb said:

I'm going to have one more attempt at returning to running next month & want to minimise the impact on my knees

My background: I've had extensive knee issues including meniscus that put me off running before I discovered the antidote.

For me it's all about minimal drop. I would give ALTRAs a go (O drop). Yes you then have to be very careful about ramping up mileage slowly to avoid achilles injuries, but that's a good strategy no matter what. The more I run (without injury) with low drop shoes, the better my knees feel and the stronger they are.

Good luck.

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16 minutes ago, DiaboloACT said:

My background: I've had extensive knee issues including meniscus that put me off running before I discovered the antidote.

For me it's all about minimal drop. I would give ALTRAs a go (O drop). Yes you then have to be very careful about ramping up mileage slowly to avoid achilles injuries, but that's a good strategy no matter what. The more I run (without injury) with low drop shoes, the better my knees feel and the stronger they are.

Good luck.

Cheers.  Interestingly, when I run in minimal drop shoes, my calves go ballistic.  However, I have committed to a calf strengthening program for the next 4 weeks before I even attempt to run.

I also run in hard orthotics.....and when I last tried calf compression sleeves!  Both those will probably feature again, though I do wonder if the hard plastic orthotics negate the benefit of a well cushioned shoe?

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1 minute ago, ComfortablyNumb said:

I also run in hard orthotics.....and when I last tried calf compression sleeves!  Both those will probably feature again, though I do wonder if the hard plastic orthotics negate the benefit of a well cushioned shoe?

As do I.  Suffered a fair bit from right calf injuries because my knee was rolling in so have had orthotics just for running for the last 10 years and never had a problem since.  The hokas I'm running in have a 3.5mm drop I think and the orthotic keeps the instep up - the cushioning isn't impacted. 

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13 hours ago, truck said:

As do I.  Suffered a fair bit from right calf injuries because my knee was rolling in so have had orthotics just for running for the last 10 years and never had a problem since.  The hokas I'm running in have a 3.5mm drop I think and the orthotic keeps the instep up - the cushioning isn't impacted. 

Which model of Hoka are you using Truck?

From what you & Diabolo have said, a combination of well cushioned Hoka, but with minimal drop might address both my issues?

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40 minutes ago, ComfortablyNumb said:

Which model of Hoka are you using Truck?

From what you & Diabolo have said, a combination of well cushioned Hoka, but with minimal drop might address both my issues?

I’m using bondi’s for roads and Stinson atr for trails. Tried briefly using the bondi’s on trails but it just rips the soles apart. 

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6 hours ago, ComfortablyNumb said:

Which model of Hoka are you using Truck?

From what you & Diabolo have said, a combination of well cushioned Hoka, but with minimal drop might address both my issues?

Or these:

https://www.altrarunning.com/shop/men/men-39%3Bs-paradigm-45-alm1948g?variationId=000#hero=0

image.thumb.png.c3efc565ed1eca5689ede3052b2137f4.png

Or the Torin:

https://www.altrarunning.com/shop/men/men-39%3Bs-torin-4-alm1937f?variationId=061#hero=0

image.thumb.png.3e82ab0555e732dcd3b4aff9661d0895.png

Edited by DiaboloACT

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On 21/05/2019 at 1:58 PM, ComfortablyNumb said:

Anyone know how treadmill running compares to road or trail in terms of impact?

Treadmill: Increased load on calf achilles and foot, decreased load on hip and knee. 

Cadence increases slightly on treadmill, if you measure a low cadence on treadmill will be lower on ground

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Hoka's don't last as long as other shoes but if you shop around you should be able to pick up outdated models at half price which still makes them pretty good value.  I've had hip surgery and a number of decent injuries and so far have managed to come back from all of them using Hokas.

Try these and let me know how you go:

https://shop.hokaoneone.com.au/sale

PS - I've tried the Arahi's and reckon they are pretty good.

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I recently bought a pair of the Clifton 1s and whilst not a bad shoe didn't dind them any where near the 'running on clouds' type thing people hype about? I found my Nike zoom flys softer to be honest 

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I am wearing Hoka Speed Goats off road mainly because the shoe part is narrower than all the other Hoka off road shoes. Any suggestions what on road shoe would be similar. I have narrow foot and find some of the Hokas I could almost get both feet in one.  Im looking for comfort not speed!! 

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2 hours ago, Lesmack said:

I am wearing Hoka Speed Goats off road mainly because the shoe part is narrower than all the other Hoka off road shoes. Any suggestions what on road shoe would be similar. I have narrow foot and find some of the Hokas I could almost get both feet in one.  Im looking for comfort not speed!! 

I have a pair of SGII and SGIII in rotation,  after a bit of experimenting have found I need them to be a whole size bigger than my regular Cliftons (4 &5s).  So I wear a UK 9.5 in Cliftons and 10.5 in SG.  I find overall, the SG a little smaller but I always like to leave room for Twin Skin socks.

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