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Guest Gimili

Three tips from real good triathletes

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Guest Gimili

Was thinking about that other thread and what someone said amongst it all.

 

These 5 people listed above read some of the crap on here and post on here occasionally (some more than others) and were/ are pretty handy triathletes.

 

Thought I do something different and suggest they post the 3 things that drives/ drove them to achieve the most and what got them into the sport. Obviously don't have to post a word and I appreciate this is a bit on the spot, basically up to you folk and if its to personal or a bit rude in asking, no need to tell me to pi$$ off (well you can if you want, gee's you can even do both, though if you were to tell me to pi$$ off, I think you should do so whilst buying me a beer :lol: ), just thought it might be interesting, even if it only helps one person.

 

editted, yes and Dr Anderson and any other fairly handy elite type triathlete that might stop by.

Edited by gimili9

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Gim..always happy to help with an affirmation and an encouraging word.

 

Being a "handy triathlete" is a relative term and each of the abovementioned athletes has had a range of successes at different levels. What I did in the sport will never compare to what Chris Mac has achieved and I would never speak of my achievements in the same breath as his.

 

I did my first Triathlon at age 15 in 1982 in the Elouera Tri_Marathon. I entered it because all the people I respected in the swimming, surf life saving, and running communities were also in it.

 

I always managed to do reasonably well. In 1985 I won my first race outright at age 19 (Macquarie Towns Triathlon). It was then I became truly hooked on Triathlon and wanted desperately to race as a pro and give a good account of myself.

 

To cut a very long story short...217 triathlons later I could tell you what I wished I didn't do.... ;)

 

1) Not attached my success or failure as a reflection of my worth as a person

2) Not gone to Northies every Friday and Sunday night...mmmm beer :D

3) Been smarter and not trained as intensely and been so egotistical in pack runs and rides

4) Not had Welchie as a mate (comparisons in all spheres never matched him brr)

5) Let girlfriend problems affect my training (soft I know...) :lol:

6) Come second to Greg Bennett twice in the Richie Walker Triathlon :lol:

 

What drove me???? (in no particular order)

 

1) Loved winning or reaching a goal

2) Loved beating people I didn't like or respect

3) Training harder than most people

4) Feeling some sense that I was supposed to be doing Triathlon

5) Immersing myself in a truly remarkable sport and lifestyle that sustained me for years and years

6) Being a triathlete made me different to the average person

7) Being an athlete "helped" with the ladies :D

8) Winning local derbys (11 Kurnells, 3 Bundeenas, 2 National Parks)

 

Must be beer time..

 

Was thinking about that other thread and what someone said amongst it all.

 

These 5 people listed above read some of the crap on here and post on here occasionally (some more than others) and were/ are pretty handy triathletes.

 

Thought I do something different and suggest they post the 3 things that drives/ drove them to achieve the most and what got them into the sport. Obviously don't have to post a word and I appreciate this is a bit on the spot, basically up to you folk and if its to personal or a bit rude in asking, no need to tell me to pi$$ off (well you can if you want, gee's you can even do both, though if you were to tell me to pi$$ off, I think you should do so whilst buying me a beer :D ), just thought it might be interesting, even if it only helps one person.

 

editted, yes and Dr Anderson and any other fairly handy elite type triathlete that might stop by.

 

300821[/snapback]

 

 

 

Edited by Coach@triathlon

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Guest Mister Marsellus Wallace

As for the original question, I am flattered to be included in that group, funny I got an email from someone in that group not long ago telling me how useless I was as an athlete, to that person who believes (and even writes) his own press, I think that Maximus said it well..... :"The time for honouring yourself will soon be at an end"...

 

As for the rest I will just cut and paste what Mick said, that is pretty accurate for me as well right down to the losing the plot over sheilas a few times, and acknowledge that Mick was a far more talented athlete than I was, we had a few tussles but he was generally the better and and awesome cyclist which he proved again not so long ago by posting the fastest non drafting time outright i.e winning a Kurnell race. Mick and I have had our differences, even worked together 20 years ago for a short time, but I respect you mate.

 

As for me, for the non believers, I was fat with no sporting background, and the only thing that sustained me was that I was very angry and very determined. I swam a little bit as a kid and surfed in my teens, but never ran until I was 20 and never rode a bike until I was 21.

 

Now that I dont do triathlons anymore I am fat and angry (again :lol: ), although I still love sport just as much if in fact not more than ever. Still smash the shit out of myself and dont know why other than it hurts so good.

 

Thankyou and goodnight.

Edited by Mister Marsellus Wallace

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I had the pleasure of meeting Greg Welsh at his book launch "Heart of a champion" signing about a year ago at Bondi.

 

He took the time to speak to me and I asked him for some tips about training for Ironman.

 

He said on the bike do the distance at least once as well as the swim and have belief in myself and it is not that hard and to have a mental focus on being able to finish.

 

He signed the book " to Dave, hope to welcome you to the ironman club"

 

well all I can say it was a great inspiration and can now proudly say I am now in that club.

 

I will never forget how humble he was and took the time to speak to me...

 

I also remember Big Chris and June where there also.. another legend and mate of Gregs.

 

so 4 good tips and thanks Greg...

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Guest Mister Marsellus Wallace

Whoops three tips:

 

1. Be fat

 

2. Be angry

 

3. Be determined and ask yourself the hard questions.

 

Bonus: Be slightly crazy.

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Ok Gimmilli here it is. Will keep it pretty short and basic. Hope it makes sence.

 

* First heard of triathlon in 1986 when my Friend Clinton barter started doing them.

 

* First watched a triathlon on TV in 1987 when Dave Scott beat Mark Allen in the Hawaii Ironman. My first thought was wow, that looks really cool.

 

*My entire life i wanted to be a Marathon Champion like Deek and Moneghetti.

 

* I met Sean Maroney in 1989 at the Southside Masters Thursday night running meet. All the triathletes would come to this run.

 

*Sean gave me my history lesson in the sport as his brother was a very good Triathlete and they had all the Triathlon Videos at their home. We would watch all these races, read all the magazines and Sean would tell me all about this sport.

 

*In November 1992 I did my first Triathlon, the Diahatsu Wollongong Triathlon and won the junior category and a trip to New Caledonia. i was hooked.

 

*Raced Junior Worlds in Manchester 1993 and finished 4th decided then and thier i wanted to be a proffessional triathlete.

 

*Returned to Australia to finish University. Sean and myslef wrote a list of al the races in the World we were going to win in our career. I still have this list to this day.

 

*Sean and I would tell anybody who listened that we were going to be the best triathletes in the World. Some of the shire guys did not like our arrogance but we did not care. Greg Welch was the king of the shire and king of the world, and we would try and race him at every chance we could get. You got this chance every Tuesday and thursday morning in the triathlon pack rides, and every wednesday night at the club run.

 

*Maybe we were dillusional, but We lived it and I really wanted to be the best in the World. Sean enjoyed the party scene more than the discipline that was required with training and would often miss sessions. I was determined to beat Greg Welch one day. That was my aim. i thought if you could beat Greg Welch you would be the best in the World.

 

*Formula 1 Triathlon started in 1995 and the St George Series and this really made us focus on training and set a goal close to home. I qualified for the series in 1995 with other shire locals, Greg welch, Jason Metters and Jason Harper. Some of the older guys who were always putting myself and Sean down and tried their arse off to get into this series and failed to qualify, gave us a hard time because we got our arse kicked on TV. I did not care. We were in the seeries and they were not.

 

* Finished University in 1995. Started Work at Bankers Trust. Lasted 6 months before deciding to quit and go to race proffessionally in Europe. I had made some contacts in 1993 and sold everything I owned and packed up and flew to Europe with my girlfriend. We just bummed and and lived out of a suitcase.

 

*Finished 6th in the Paris ITU World Cup in July 1996 - Won 2500 dollars. Thought i was the richest guy in the world.

 

*2 weeks later won the ITU World Cup race in Drummondville Canada - Won 10 000 dollars. We were rich.

 

* Qualified for my first Australia Team to race World Championships in Cleveland. Met Miles Stewart on this trip. Team was, Miles, Welch, Beven, Bennett, Me, Trench, Knowles. Finished 18th place. Talked to miles. He convinced me to return to Australia and move to the Gold Coast to train under his father. I agreed, flew home and was on the Gold Coast 2 weeks after worlds.

 

*Learned how to train and the importance of consistency under the guidance of Col. At this point in time this was the best training group in Australia. It was awesome. realised as Col used to say it, Cronulla was a great place to relax but not to train. The cronulla triathlon culture was not good for a proffessional athlete.

 

*Immediately improved and had an incredible 1996-97 Australian domestic Season. Finished 4th in the F1 series and won Australian Sprin title and Australian Triathlon series. Finished 2nd at Australian Championships to Brad Beven. Started ticking off some of the races on the list that Sean and I had written out 3 years before.

 

*Won the first two rounds of the 1997 ITU World Cup series- moved back to south of France for season. Broke up with Girlfriend and got angry at the world.

 

* Raced well on World Cup ciruit-ranked number 1 in World.

 

*moved back to Sutherland Shire in september to prepare for World Champs. Trained hard with Sean Maroney and Clinton Barter to try and win World title.

 

*Won World title in november 1997. Won World Cup series.

 

* Won 4 more World Cup races in 1998-99 - Ranked number 1 in the World for 3 years.

 

*mother passed away from breast cancer April 1999 - Contemplated retirement. Stopped training and did not go to Australian Training camp in Europe. Sean Maroney and Mick Gilliam talked me back into training to get me back in the right frame of mind. Started training in August for ITU Worlds in Montreal.

 

* Missed Olympic selection in April 2000 - Contemplated retirment. Met my wife and decided to go to America and complete the list of races I had written out with Sean. Sean joined me in the USA later that year and watched me win San Diego international Triathlon and Chicago Triathlon. These were two races that were won by his sporting Idol Mike Pigg. We sat in the otel rooms like two kids looking at the trophys and Sean telling me who had won these races in the past. These were great times. This made me want to win more of these races and put my name next to the great champions of this sport. As Sean would always say - This is your time to shine man.

 

*Moved in with michellie Jones in San Diego. Learned what a professional athlete was. She taught me so much and matured me as an athlete. Incredibe learning curve here. The most professional athlete i have ever been associated with.

 

*Went on a rampage of racing - Winning 32 races and staying undefeated for 2/1/2 years. Spoke with Sean as we ticked the races of the list.

 

*Won the Goodwill Games in 2001 after Crashing at Worlds in Canada. Qualified for Commonwealth Games. Decided the ITU circuit was not for me. I was enjoying the racing in the USA and was dictating my own future, and not bing reliant on the decisions of Triathlon Australia. Also starting to make a very healthy living from the sport in the USA.

 

*Decided to move across to Ironman in 2002 with debut in Australia. Foster was one of the races on my list of races to win. Did that in April. Spoke with Sean who was in the USa at the time after the race. He was losing his mind.

 

*Sean passed away june 2002. Was supposed to come and watch me race in Alcatraz. Won a record 4th Alcatraz title and dedicated this win to Sean. Incredibly emotional race for me as it was Mike Piggs Record i was breaking and this was Seans Idol and this was why he was coming to watch this race.

 

*Raced Commonwealth Games in August - Informed Triathlon Australia that i would not be looking at Athens as an athlete. I wanted to win Hawaii as this was what Sean and i had discussed our entire lives. I wanted to complete the list.

 

*Raced Hawaii and failed in 2002, 2003, 2004

 

*Broke 8 hours in the Ironman - Ticked that off the list. Won Roth which was also on the list we had made.

 

*Married in 2004 to Emma - jane - Daughter Tahlia born in 2004/Sienna born 2006

 

 

* Here we are now still chasing two final things on our list. Once this is achieved i will frame this crumpled piece of A4 paper and put this up in my pool room. This has become my life and my driving force. I feel fortunate and proud that I never gave up the chase and aim to complete this list for myself and to complete a dream that two teenage kids talked about in a TV Room as youngsters. I want to show my children to have the courage and the belief that dreams are worth chasing. A dream becomes a goal when you write it down on paper and goals are worth setting and chasing.

 

You ask what you need to succeed well in this sport. I believe the most important thing you need is a solid support team and a team that you believe in. I have had this my entire career. You cannot second guess your support team. Many people will tell you your doing things wrong or give you all the reasons why you should be doing things a different way. You need to believe in your team and believe in what your doing. It is this that you will draw on when the going gets tough and if you doubt this then you have nothing.

 

You need to have a sound belief that you can do it and the courage to chase your dreams. Along the way you will always have the knockers and the ones who draw huge satisfaction out of your failures. Distance yourself from these people. They dont understand that the real losers are the ones who dont have the courage or the conviction to actually try and achieve a goal. They are usually these people themselves.

 

You need to have good discipline and work ethic but be smart enough to understand the fine balance of this sport. Triathlon is a single sport that requires training in 3 disciplines. Many people forget this important fact.

 

Jabba says you need to be angry. I agree I always raced well on anger but it needs to be centred and focused. Anger projected the wrong way can be distructive.

 

I think the basic key to success is belief, discipline and consistency.

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Guest Gimili

Great post's all round - thanks Mick, Jabbs and Macca.

 

I spotted Belinda typing last night so hopefully she will finish that and post tonight.

 

Tim, Mitch, Shortis?

 

Any other lurkers?

 

Short, sweet, long it don't matter and as I said, if you don't want to do it, that's cool too.

Edited by gimili9

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Feel like a bit of a hubbard responding after that.

Macca still loves you Gim.

I always ran well but hated the feeling of running so hard you dry reached so I took the soft option and specialised in shot putt discuss and long jump represented NSW as a 15yr old. Finally got bored with that and listened to my old man who always told me son you are an endurance athlete. Did a heap of fun runs etc.

Met a little bloke by the name of Greg Welch at a school athletics carnival we were 15, Welchy played squash and we ran into each other about 3yrs later at the local squash courts were he worked and I went to keep my girlfriend happy.

Still looking for something different found a series called Ride N Stride bought a bike for $500 bucks and went off for a race. Ran into Welchy again and a bloke by the name of Bruce Hopkins this is the guy who got Welchy started in triathlons.

Did my first triathlon Nepean in 1986 watched Welchy at Forster in 1987 competed my first IM at Forster in 1988 and qualified for Hawaii in a time of 10hrs 38min.

Having lived in Campbelltown since I was 10 yrs old I had started to drive to Cronulla a lot on weekends to train and hang out with Bruce and Welchy. Any way ended up living with 5 guys including Greg and Bruce in Gymea. Missed IM in 89 did The Great Race first time ever in top 50 I started to think maybe I could go alright in this sport. I couldnt swim for shit so Welchy dragged me along to Sutho pool to train with this little bloke with a great mo (Dick Quinn) I soon learnt what training was all about Hanging out with guys like Mick Maroney,Rick Pallister Jabba and the Southwells. The wealth of info that was passed to me was unbelieveable. 1990 I finished 5th at Forster in 9hrs 9min. 1991 8hrs 43min 1992 8hrs 33min this was done while working 50 plus hours per week never considered turning pro had a good job a great life an awesome wife the sport wasnt costing me anything as sponsors took care of that. Finished up in 1997 at Forster finishing 10th in one of the best fields ever assembled in Australia. And while standing on stage next to Paulli Kiuru who had finished 9th I realised how blessed I was to have been given the ability to stand were I was.

So Gim to answer your question what drove me I really enjoyed the feeling of doing IM sounds sick but being that fit training with your mates day in day out it didnt get any better than that.

 

What I wished I had done. Was raced more overseas.

Raced more. With my focus on IM's I trained a lot raced very little.

 

Advice to Triathletes today enjoy it look around at were you are the friends you have made from the sport, the places we go to compete.

 

What I love about Triathlons you can do a race and compare your time against the best in the world no other sport in the world gives this luxury. Iam pretty sure Greg Norman wouldnt have responded the way Chris did.

 

Tim

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Guest Mister Marsellus Wallace

Intellectual differences notwithstanding, I am embarassed to be included in this group. Dont think I deserve to be included.

 

If you are talking about lurkers, I seem to recall a poster who went by the handle of little Aussie Battler or something like that whose post would add some value to this discussion, although you could buy the book :lol:

 

There are a few other lurkers and very occasional posters who have also given enough away of themselves to support strong suspicious as to their identities .. :lol: A few of those kids would probably be able to offer some amazing anecdotes from the past I suspect.

Edited by Mister Marsellus Wallace

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Detai,

 

Molina is the unsung champion in world triathlon. He won more races than anyone during the 1980's and was successful in everything from sprint distance to Ironman, while maintaining 50 hour training weeks. He didn't have the talent of Allen, the charisma of Tinley, or the profile of Dave Scott. Molina was the king of training and the emperor of triathlon racing.

 

He came out to Australia in 1986 to compete in the 2Day FM Triathlon in Sydney and again in 1991 and 1992. He managed to come along to a Southwell bbq and a few other training events during that time. One of the funniest things I have ever seen was Molina trying to do our once weekly aerobics class down at Sylvania Gym...a complete unco!!!

 

His website is www.scottmolina.com he writes extensively and has some wonderful stories to tell.

 

Mick

 

I wonder if Brad Beven will post. Maybe even Molina?

Top thread.

 

301113[/snapback]

 

 

 

Edited by Coach@triathlon

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Chris,

 

The way you have spoken about Sean and kept alive his memory brought tears to my eyes. Sean would be stoked that people are still talking about him!

 

Thanks for doing that. My family have read your words and are so very grateful that Seanie had such a wonderfully loyal best mate.

 

Sean wanted desperately to race in Hawaii with you and would be so proud to know what you have done in the sport. The way you conquered those goals, despite your personal pain and heartache, is more admirable than your impressive list of race wins.

 

I would just like to add that Sean did win a couple of races in his career. He was the winner of the Callala Half Ironman and won a Sprint Race at Wanda. He had a ton of talent and bucket loads of personality. Some of those Mt Keira/Deadlies rides we did are still fixed in my memory with Sean cracking jokes, hitchhiking home and taking short cuts. He had us all in stitches most of the time!

 

Anyway, thanks Chris and I hope your time in the US is a happy and fruitful one.

 

Mick

 

*Returned to Australia to finish University. Sean and myslef wrote a list of al the races in the World we were going to win in our career. I still have this list to this day.

 

*Sean and I would tell anybody who listened that we were going to be the best triathletes in the World. Some of the shire guys did not like our arrogance but we did not care. Greg Welch was the king of the shire and king of the world, and we would try and race him at every chance we could get. You got this chance every Tuesday and thursday morning in the triathlon pack rides, and every wednesday night at the club run.

 

*Maybe we were dillusional, but We lived it and I really wanted to be the best in the World. Sean enjoyed the party scene more than the discipline that was required with training and would often miss sessions. I was determined to beat Greg Welch one day. That was my aim. i thought if you could beat Greg Welch you would be the best in the World.

Edited by Coach@triathlon

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Guest Mister Marsellus Wallace

Well I have been off the piss lately and tonite because I dont have me young bloke with me due to changed arrangemetns I went to Northies and got a gutful.

 

So.... warning, this is gunna be good because silly old Jabba is pissed... well.

 

I have always been very realistic about my abilities and to put it bluntly, there were always a few that were quite a bit better than me, including the other names mentioned on this thread.

 

One of the most appalling and insulting things I have had said to me by anyone (yeah mate it really scored for points), is an email I got from a bloke a little while ago telling me I was a coward in a government job that sits on a fence and takes his pay every fortnight and never had the courage to follow my dreams.

 

I would strongly rebut that point old mate. I still say that I dont deserve to be on that list, but as others have judged, here goes. I might add at this juncture that as I have said before I was a fat little kid with no athletic background who left school at 15 with not even a school certificate because I had to support my family as Dad f-ked off.

 

I was never as talented as the best guys. Sure I could hop of the bike with Welchie et al, but when he and the others was running 31 I was running 33 or 34 and miles back downt the road leaving us plebs to fight for the scraps.

 

One of the differences between a lot of those folks and most of the rest of us is that we had to face the reality of full time employment in order to survive. I actually did roll the dice and follow my dreams (and failed) by taking leave without pay and going to the US for a while, but hard reality beckoned and luckily and now with 21 years in my present employ I didnt chuck it in.

 

There are a lot of folks who walk that fine line who dont have the ability of the very very best who train just as hard (and sometimes harder) and destroy themselves in every race but quite frankly are just not good enough.

 

I was one of those people, and I used to hate myself that I could only finish second, or lead the bike and get run down 2 kays from the finish and that happened a lot of times. Because you are not good enough, but you 'burn matches' in a major way every time you race, I believe it has a cumulative effect.

 

At least it did for me, I managed to hospitalise myself a number of times (fact) had a couple of stints in coronary care (fact) and due to having the wrong body type and developing borderline anorexia to keep my weight down, have had to have one joint replaced in my thirties (hip) and frankly have very dodgy health and get sick lots now in my forties.

 

I dont want this to sound like a sob story, but if anyone doesnt think I put in the hard yards and was weak as piss because they were more genetically gifted than I, well they can get f-ked.

 

Beside that fact, when some of the juniors were getting better and coming along, a lot of us older guys were really at the end of their tethers, the last time I got top ten in a truly elite field was Noosa 92 and the last time I won a race overall was Batemans Bay in 1993.

 

During the course of that time of course I was a Police Officer, and worked in the Tactical Response Group, on the street at Kings Cross and generally did things and saw things that dont really bear thinking about on a daily basis, have actually been shot at (the gaol escapee actually fired a shot in my face and misse that singed my eyebrows and sent my blind and deaf) and so anyone that thinks I am a coward in a government job an sits on a fence and takes my pay every fortnight when they have led a priveliged life due to superior genetic talent is disrespectful and clueless in my book.

 

Most of us never have the talent to win Hawaii or win a world championship, those that do should realise that despite the hard work they put it that it is truly a gift and be thankful for that and respectful of those (most people in the world) that worked just as hard but didnt have those same gifts....

 

I may be drunk, but at least I can still type.

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Guest Mister Marsellus Wallace

I might add that alongside my triathlon 'career' which was really just a hobby I took far too seriously, I had something I held in quite high regard, and dear to my heart and being, something considerably more than 'just a job' and that is the fact that I am a cop, like a few others around here.

 

I had to go back to school at night while supporting my family just to get the requisite education to get into my present employ, tried three times to do it before I was successful, and as anyone who has had to study and work hard to get through the academy or a military college, it aint a piece of cake and is not a piece of cake.

 

It is very different for just going to a job interview shaking hands and saying "congrats youve got the job". Remember that next time you think cops or soliders are shitkickers, we have done it a lot harder than most just to get the right to wear the uniform.

Edited by Mister Marsellus Wallace

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Guest Gimili

Jabbs

 

I for one wouldn't do your job for quids, heard to many stories and seen what it can do blokes - think there is probably a fine line between some absolute awful sh!t and some really awful sh!t. I've had three uncles that were coppers, one arrested Neddy Smith one day, never been more scared in his life, I've also heard him talk about walking into a crime scene to find some bastard has multiple stabbed his parents and brother then tried to set em alight, had another uncle that took the drink in that job, and I reckon that was the job combined with a police/ surf club culture of hitting the pi$$ and another one who threw it all away and became a life guard down Cronulla - probably close to the best job in the world and his been doing ever since.

 

Anyone that has lived in the real world knows it ain't fence sitting just as its easy to throw lines when your pi$$ed off, whether rightly or wrongly. We all get to review our life choices every now again and correct em where we have been the goose and move forward, I don't think you can put a time limit on that. We will all come across people that are struggling at certain junctures in their lives, as well as dickheads and f$ck wits and all to often the best form of defence is attack and I guess it gets disappointing when no thought occurs, and worse when it does, but that is human nature and it cuts both ways. I always think its really important to move forward in a positive manner no matter the circumstance - half empty/ half full glass scenario.

 

Dreams are relative, and as someone made a point on here not long back, genetics play a big part in it all. How many people have picked up a cricket bat, but there was only one Don Bradman - I wonder how many other Don Bradman's never got the opportunity to pick up a cricket bat.

 

Yeah, you might not have had the gift of Bradman, or even those in a so called lesser sport that we all dearly love, such as a Macca or Crowie, but I wonder how many lives you have saved through you're career by arresting some knumbskull that you will never know about. I wonder if you hadn't of been leading those races and run down with 2k to go, whether the other bastard ever would have got that quick and achieved what they did.

 

I watched IM07 on the tv yesterday, bloke on there finished IM after being given a death sentence of 8 months with leukemia, absolutely sensational. Jenni Barclay, the lady in pink finished, I cheered her over the line at Huski this year, with one or two others with 40 seconds to go before cut off, there she is two months later finishing IM - bet you she trained the house down to do that, whereas others on the same training may have won the race and then of course there was green machine - RIP.

 

Plenty of people out there respect you for who you are and what you have achieved in not just triathlon but life, and as that little fella of yours grows you will see that even more, just wait and see. We all have doubt, we all have insecurities and most of us are our own harshest critic and perhaps we shoudn't be.

 

I'll buy you a beer one day soon,

Matt

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OK-you are right as I did start to type something on this topic the other night after a long and hard day of training over here in the mountains in Switzerland but I wanted to give the topic the time and energy it deserved so I saved it and continued today-

I began triathlon way back (not giving you the exact year) when I was in Sydney University- actually did my first Olympic Distance triathlon at the 'University Summer Games' when they were in Perth- Angela Milne smashed us all and I met 'Macca' for the first time- but not at the triathlon. He was at the athletics track running for Uni NSW. He really didn't know much about triathlon back then but you could tell he was intrigued by it. Funny to think that he is now one of the best in the sport. Back then he was more interested in the girls and the beer- well he was only a boy back then.

I began as a very average age-grouper who really didn't show a great deal of natural talent- well nothing like Macca or MJ. But through a lot of hard work, and the sheer fact that I loved the sport, I managed to work my way up from age-grouper to professional.

I stuck with Olympic Distance racing until I finally won my age-group at the World Championships when they were held in Perth for the first time- that was my very first 'real' goal that I had set myself in the sport. From there I decided to venture into the 'longer' events but definitely NOT Ironman- I still thought this was crazy.

Justin and I travelled to Boulder in 1996 as Justin had completed his first IM in Australia and had qualified for Hawaii- he wanted to make sure he trained properly for the 'big one'. So I took leave from teaching and off we set. We were really lucky that we were able to hook up with Welchy and Sian, Chris and Sara Legh. Greg and Sian had rented Mike Pigg's house for the summer and we shared a downstairs unit with Chris and Sarah. It was my first experience of living the life of a full-time athlete and I can tell you that I was hooked! I did most of my training that summer with Sian and Julie Moss- they taught me so much and they were both my idols. Sian was training for Hawaii and so a lot of my training was Ironman specific.

I still remember a session we did in the garage of Mike Pigg's house as it was snowing outside and we couldn't ride. There was Welchy, Sian, Chris Legh, Christian Bustos, Justin and myself. We did what is known as a "sutto special'- it was the old Nice triathlon course done on the turbo- took us 4hrs in total and was bloody hard but I had probably one of the best times ever in that sweaty garage. Welchy and the boys kept us entertained the entire session. I still laugh when I do that same session on the turbo today.

I trained all that summer for Ironman but I honestly never had the slightest intention of doing one- even after I went to Hawaii and watched the race. I loved Kona but was more interested in 'Lulu's' than actually doing the race. To tell the truth I really didn't think that I could do it.

Funny how things change. Finally in 1999 I was convinced to give IM Oz a go- I trained so hard for it and really took it way too seriously- which was not how I usually approached races. Long story short- I dnf'd. My first Ironman race was a failure. I was devastated but, looking back, I went into that race with the wrong attitude, unrealistic goals and a 'big head'. As a result, I got a good kick up the bum. I have never gone into a race with that attitude again- so far it seems to be working. So tip #1- never forget the reason you first got into this sport- because you love it, because it is fun, because it is so satisfying to run, walk or crawl across that finish line.

Now I have completed 25 Ironman Distance races and have not dnf'd a single one since the first- I honestly do not know life without Ironman but please do not think that this means I do not have a life outside of Ironman- the difference is that I have never taken this sport so seriously that it is just a job to me. I love this sport- the training, the racing, the socialising, the travelling. It is a lifestyle for me and not just a way of making money. I still find it funny that I am able to do this sport full-time.

I am here sitting in my little one-bedroom aparment in Leysin, Switzerland as I type this, looking out over the mountains- I can see as far as Mont Blanc. It is the most perfect afternoon- never in a million years would I have guessed that this is what I would be doing with myself at 36 years of age. So my second tip to you all is never, ever be afraid to dream big. I am not that talented- just ask my coach, but what I do have is a hard-work ethic, determination, a competitive spirit and I am a big dreamer- what else do you do on long runs!!!

Friends still ask me when I am going to give it all away and I used to answer 'in a couple of years'. Now I answer -'I honestly don't know'- I still love the sport as much as I did when I first started. I still get to the start line of a race and giggle in anticipation, I still thrive on the thrill of competition and I still love the after parties and the 'post race' chatter. When I was in Lake Placid the other week I had a good chat with Karen Smyers- an absolute legend in our sport- she looks amazing, still loves the sport and is still kicking serious arse- she is not thinking about retiring anytime soon- I think that is awesome. I want to be like her!!

So, again I am living up to my name as a seriously BIG talker- but my advice to you all is to enjoy the sport, don't take yourselves or the sport too seriously- there is a big world out there for us all to enjoy. But in saying that, I think it is OK to be totally addicted to the sport of triathlon- I am and I am not afraid to show it. It is an amazing sport and a great way of life.

Belinda x

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Hey Mick,

 

I dont know how to do the PM thing too well and dont know your email so i will post again on this site. Their is nothing here that I am embarrassed about so happy reading. I just read your post Mick and wanted you to know this.

 

Sean was my best mate. I guess as you get older you really start to appreciate the bond of friendship more and more. I miss him dearly and go up and see him and my mother once a month when I am at home and sit down and have a chat with them both as they are resting only a couple of hundred metres apart.

 

Emma Jane (my wife) and I still laugh and talk about our times together. Emma was captured by Seans magnetic personality and more so his passion and loyal friendship. We spent a lot of time together in the USA at races like Chicago, San Diego, Orange County, San Jose with your brother and Emma would spend the entire race with him whilst I was out their racing. He captured her with the history of the races i was doing and who had won them before me, and just how incredible this time was. His saying was -Its your time to shine- and I still think this before every race i do. It has become my mantra. These are the greatest memories of my life. Winning Perth World Championships when Sean and I trained our arses off for 12 weeks at Dick caines and smashing through the national park on the bike, when everyone said Hamish, Beven, Welch, Miles and Lessing were unbeatable. Mate we did that man. No science, no secret training methods, just discipline, hard work and a joint belief in a dream. I spoke with Sean 1 hour before that race, and you know what he said to me. I was scared and nervous and had huge self doubt. Greg Welch was racing and Brad Beven and everybody. We had posters of these guys on our walls only 2 years before.

I told sean i was nervous and hoped i would go well. Actually I said if i got in the top 10 i would be really happy. He said to me - "F$ck top 10 man. This is your time to shine mate. You can do this. If you win this race we will be the new kings of the shire. We will be the new godfathers. Just win. No one can beat you man. I have been in this sport my whole life and no one can beat you man." I believed him. Thats the thing. I believed him. I was immediately in the right frame of mind and thought to myself I have nothing to lose. Then when it happened and I did win, your brother was on the phone to me in tears mick. I am not bullshitting. He was losing his mind and we just laughed like kids in shock. I was 23 years old and he was 22. We were kids and we just beat the world together. It was amazing.

 

I can honestly say I would not be here today sitting in Boulder Colorado if it was not for your brother. We were such similar spirits and dreamed big together. I guess when your young the difference between a dream and reality is not clouded. It is only as you age and surround yourself with negativity and barriers, do you start to put obstacles up and doubt what is and isnt possible. Sean and I lived this and he never lost the belief in the dream. He never lost the belief in me and I guess that is what kept me believing. I think we drove your mother to insanity as we would sit down in your TV room at Kareela, watching triathlon videos day after day and talking about when we were going to go to the USA and race and go to Roth and Hawaii and we both had to do the Nice Triathlon. Man we were dreamers, but we dreamed together and this is what I miss.

 

I look at my children now and i see their free spirits and understand now what my perants used to say when they told me, you can be anything you want to be in life. It is so true. Sean never lost this Mick and that is why i miss him so much.

 

Man i know we pissed a lot of the older Triathlon crew in cronulla off, because we probably were obnoxious little shits, but man we worshipped you guys mate. You were Seans idol man. Watching you smash to pieces the National Park Triathlon and Bundeena. Mate we were in absolute awe of you guys. We were just young and probably pissed you guys off, but man we loved it. I still love it. I still talk this shit about the old times with Gilliam and the crew. I love it mate.

 

Sean went and watched the 1990 Ironman in Hawaii with your dad. Mate this was the greatest memory of his life mate. He had the black and white pictures of Mark Allen up on his wall that he took on his camera. He would tell me about the race and the wind and the heat and everything. It was like an imaginery place that sounded like hell to me but his passion and talk made it sound like the greatest event in the world. It was this that captured me. He painted this picture of this event that was so great, that we swore we would race and win that event together one day. Actually our dream was to lead the bike at Havi. We just wanted to be the first two guys at the halfway point on the bike. That was our together dream mate. To lead Hawaii together. Two little shits from Cronulla, who probably drank too much and partied too much, were going to be first to turn at Havi like Wolfgang Dietrich, Mike Pigg and Jurgen Zack.

 

I can tell you a true story mate, in my Hawaii Ironman debut in 2002, I found myself off the front on the bike. I was like a little excited kid. Sean and I were supposed to be doing this, and here i was riding up to Havi with two guys we had watched on TV for years. These were two of our favourite triathletes mate and I was a little in awe of them both. It was Thomas Hellriegal and Jurgen Zack. Both big superstars in my eyes. We had dropped the main pack and were about 6 minutes infront at this point. As we were coming up to Havi, I remembered our talk about leading the bike at Havi. Sean and I would argue about who was going to make the turn first, him or me. Thomas Hellriegal was infront of me, and i had not said a word to either of these guys in the whole race. I rolled up alongside Thomas, and asked really politely if I could lead around the turn at Havi. He looked at me really strangely and said yes. Mate I made that turn at Havi first, looked up to the sky and said mate we have done it. That is no shit mate. It was one of the most special times in my life. The point when you see the realisation of a dream is just so special it captures your soul and you never forget it. This was one of those moments for me.

 

I like to remember these times Mick and I can tell you I will never forget them as long as i live. These are my life Mick and are as special to me as they are to yourself. Your brother was the biggest influence on my career. His belief in me, his passion for this sport, his absolute joy and excitement at my success, his personality. It kept me in this sport mate. I knew him for 13 years, I wish so much that it could have been longer. Mick what is sad for me now is how excited Sean would be at this moment in my career. This is it for us. Here I am finally one of the players in the big game, Hawaii. The single race that captured us both as teenagers. The race that he went and watched in 1990 with your dad. The race that to us was bigger than anything in the world. Man it would just be awesome. I just wish he could have seen this. Nobody in my life would appreciate this period right now as much as him, and I miss this.

 

Jabba is angry because he attacked me on this site and I wrote him an email. Tony, you never got us, and thats fine. Sean drove you to insanity, and mate so did I. We were obnoxiuos ittle turds and we did talk it big. But it was harmless. We both pissed you off for years, and you know it. How many times did you pull me aside and tell me to pull my head in and stop running with the fodder. Mate you probably had good intentions and that is fine. I am not attacking your job Tony, but you have always been one to attack me and tell me I am just lucky, or gifted or was at the right place at the right time. Never ever have you just said well done. Why did we call you the voice of Doom. It was always negative. It is always the talk about my time at the top will be over soon, and i write my own press and soon no body will ever remember me. What you dont get Tony, is I dont care. I really dont care. I didnt start this sport to be remembered or to be a superstar. I did it because I loved it and because my friends did it. For me this is what Triathlon is. I shared this dream and these aspirations as a kid and have achieved more than I ever imagined possible. I have already won and these special moments are what I remember more than how much money i have in the bank or how many people like me. This is what you dont get Tony. I have already won despite what happens, and I dont mean trophies in my cabinet or money in my bank. The fullfillment of a dream and sharing this with close friends and family is priceless mate. Money can not buy this. When you understand this Tony, then you will understand who i am and why i do what I do. You have just never got it mate and that is why you continue to struggle with what i wrote you in that email. Go and read it again mate.

 

Mick thanks for the kind words mate and I look forward to coming back to Australia with my family soon and having a beer with you. I have so many lovely stories that will make you laugh and smile about Sean. We could sit for hours mate. I would enjoy that.

 

Cheers mate,

 

Macca

 

PS: Belinda your a legend darling. Well done in Lake Placid. Awesome effort. They are all talking about it here in Boulder. Keep smashing those girls.

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Guest Gimili

Macca/ Belinda

 

Really great posts and I appreciate the time it took, if you happen to bump into any other "handy" triathletes in your travels, it would be great if you could suggest they post to get a few more perspectives.

 

Once again, thanks,

Matt

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What about someone like Ruley as well giving us a blurb. A non 'full time' pro probably has a heap of good stuff for us as well.

 

301181[/snapback]

 

 

 

 

Def not in the same category as any of the above guys but maybe in a few years.

like Macca has said Consistency, hard work and passion. When you are passionate about something, igonoring things, letting other things going and missing stuff is not a sacrifice. When everything is going good this is easy. When its cold and wet in winter and you are struggling theres a few things to try

 

1)a)When you lose your way and feel you arent going anywhere, take a day off, remember where you came from, how much faster you are now, and where you originally wanted to go before you lost sight of it.

For me this means remembering trying to swim 100metres in 2 minutes for a once off maximal effort in 2002 and being right at the back of the slow lane at squad training, having to sit on the wheel of a 17 year old junoir girl from my club on training rides(2 hours seemed forever at this stage) and hurting to hold 25km/h.

I then think about how i want to go over to hawaii and race it.

b)Al Pitmans get out of bed before you decide to skip a session(i have to have my alarm out of reach)

c)when you cant be bothered go get out there for 15 minutes(its amazing how many times this becomes 2 hours) and just use it to turn everything over.

 

 

2)Hang around with those who you want to be like and those who will help you get where you want to be. For me this meant initially hanging around with some of the old blokes from my club including one in particular who had qualified for hawaii.

After that it meant hanging around and being coached by Mitch, trying not to get dropped by his group(i still cant ride very well in groups :lol: as i dont really have much above race pace to respond to any pace changes or sharp inclines). Riding with Craig Mckenzie and Johnny Van on wednesdays for a year(the best and funniest long rides ive done +with occasionly Leon Griffin in the group-its not everyday someone you have done long rides with becomes world champ-this was one of the biggest inspirations to me(sorry mitch it tops IMWA, being out on the course and see you win in 2005 comes a close second).Training with Tim

"the razor" Berkel.

These people all make it so much easier to crank out the long hard sessions and you also realize that they are just normal people not freaks.

 

3) Develop some strong friendly rivalries. Wanting to kick your mates asses can be a huge inspiration.

Berkel-grrr his a fair way ahead of me at the moment after two awesome years but i'm gonna kick his ass at ironman oz next year.

Mitch- if i can win an ironman before 30yrs and 5 months of age i'm ahead of him haha.i've got 6.5 years left to get that one

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This has to be close to being my all time favourite thread. I even like the Macca/Jabba sparing, an not just because of my love of a verbal stouch - I think it shows a side of each's (complex??) character that is far from unattractive... Respect for both.

 

Feeling inspired I thought I'd paste some words of wisdom from Reefy a few years ago. When asked why he did Ironman by some curious tourists in Hawaii before the big dance, he replied to the following effect:

 

“It’s everything. It’s being involved with something, and with a group of people that you can only dream about being part of. There’s so much energy from everyone who does the race, and that energy flows through and combines to form this massive atmosphere and electricity that cycles up and up, which then all goes back to those people. To be part of that is just awesome. But it’s even more than that. It’s the dreaming, the planning and the feeling of getting fitter and stronger than you ever thought you could be. It’s the whole lifestyle that goes hand in hand with being involved in the race. And then during the race, the energy comes not only from yourself, but also from your competitors – who are really more your companions – and also from the eager volunteers, your friends & supporters and the cheering spectators. So with all this happening, the challenge through most of the race isn’t to push yourself, but to hold yourself back. The pain is only really toward the end, and is so insignificant compared to all the rest that it’s nothing. Nothing at all. Plus any pain by then is actually a good feeling in a way. To not have it would be disappointing, as if you haven’t given this most important physical test of your life a 100% effort. And then when you do finish, it’s more than completing a race. Your life is changed. But now I can see that in fact the event already changes and improves your life long before you finish or even start the race.”

 

Maybe he ain't in the same league athletically as Macca or Jabs or the Maroney's (he ain't no slouch though, lol) but those words are all class. Respect dude.

 

Andrew #1

Edited by Andrew #1

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3 things that drives/ drove them to achieve the most and what got them into the sport?

 

Sorry this took me a while.

 

I’ve marked the paragraphs which answer the questions of what got me into the sport*, and what drives me**. The rest is just filling in details chronologically to give you better picture. Sorry if it’s a bit long and detailed at times. But being youngish, I guess it’s all still fresh in my mind. I’m sure I’ve missed heaps, but here you go.

 

 

 

** I have always been driven by a desire achieve what I believe my body is capable of.

 

That is, I always loved to swim and run. But I never had the platform to push my body to in those disciplines until I started triathlon, and I found the perfect sport for my natural abilities that I loved pushing in – swimming and running.

 

I learnt to swim from a young age, and was competent enough to do pretty well in surf lifesaving from the nippers until I was about 18 years old. I won a few state medals, and trained hard for the board and ski legs of surf Ironman.

 

**My older brother is a very talented athlete. He grew up swimming 10 sessions a week (I only ever did 3 at most) and has been one of Australia’s best ski paddlers since he was 20. He pushed me hard in training in my teenage years on the ski and toughened me up like older brothers do. Calling me names, punching me, and pushing me around. If my brother said do something, I did it. It was great. He taught me how to go hard and push through pain. Maybe I am still trying to prove to my brother that I can be the best and go hard 

 

 

*After finishing year 12 in 1999, I started my Landscape apprenticeship. Shortly thereafter I was swimming casually with a social group of triathletes over winter (not my usual 5am start with a serious squad, and in a small local pool). They took me on my first long ride on my mums old bike (mum did triathlons well before I did) for 3 hours. They had to wait for me. But they waited, and looked after me. A very important memory that I have.

 

Later that year, with the first of my savings from my job, I bought my first bike. A Norco Blast.

 

These triathletes taught me everything that got me to finish in exactly my goal time of 9 ½ hours in IM AUS, 2002. I had a great day and was hooked. I loved the highs and lows of the marathon, and crossing the line was an incredible feeling that can’t be duplicated.

 

I’d found my platform to prove to the world my natural talent. I was going to come back in 2003 and break 9 hours as an age grouper. I trained hard, and scientifically (while still working as an apprentice landscaper) with the help of an amazing exercise physiologist and the facilities at University of NSW, Cumberland campus. I over trained and finished in 10 ½ hours.

 

The following year I had finished my 4 years of Landscaping and trained full time for a 5th at IM New Zealand, and a 4th at IM Australia. They were 4 weeks apart. I was only 22.

 

I figured this was easy, and went to USA to train for Hawaii. Again I over trained and DNF’d. I took 5 weeks rest and managed 2nd at IM Western Australia.

 

I was pretty useless most of 2005 with fatigue, then managed myself carefully into September to finish 2nd at IM Wisconsin, and qualify for Hawaii 2006.

 

**After hardly racing in 2005 I had to get some love back for the sport. I don’t often like training. But I love too race. So I headed to Europe in 2006 and just raced as often as I could. It worked, I had a few good results, some fun, and made enough money to cover the trip.

 

**After returning from Europe I trained a few weeks then headed to Hawaii and finished 17th. I was pleased with my result, and the experience, and decided it would be the last time I race there for anything but the win. After a forgettable & depressing 2005, my results in 2006, on little discipline, confirmed that I could do triathlons as my profession if I wanted.

 

(all of this that follows was subconscious at the time. Of course I still felt like I was the best and nothing psychological could actually inhibit my ability) The problem was that at 25, I’d been in and out of good form, not improved my marathon time since my first professional IM in New Zealand 2004, and didn’t have any idea what I actually wanted from the sport. I knew I wanted to be Ironman World champion, but I had no idea how to get there. I had lost some of my drive and I no longer felt as strongly about being more able than my peers. My desire to prove I was the best was a bit hollow now, and my confidence was erratic. With every day I needed to take off because I felt tired, my guilt would crush me, and make me more tired. I didn’t know my body well enough to be happy stuffing my face on my day off, or with going to a movie and hanging with mates or on a rainy day (what if it cleared up?!). And what reason did I have for success? I’m 25; I don’t need to worry about making good money for another couple of years! And if it hasn’t come to me by then I’ll get a ‘proper’ job. Then Alan Pittman showed me who and what I am.

 

In April 2007 I met an amazing girl. I’d been against girlfriends and formed some walls, but meeting my perfect girl I couldn’t just ignore her! It just meant I was conflicted by my psychological habits of feeling that I had to be selfish and do everything for the good of my triathlon career.

 

**Two weeks later I joined with Alan Pittman. Talking with Al turned me around. It turned on a light. He showed me that by thinking selfishly, feeling guilty, and denying myself the joy, pleasure, and love in this life I was actually inhibiting my ability to succeed, and the cause of my diminished desire to succeed. By allowing these into my life guilt free, and accepting they are good things that give us energy, it lifted such weight off my shoulders, and gave me back my desire and reasons for wanting to succeed, and then some.

 

Al helped me see how my body works. Accepting that it needs more rest days than others, I now take them with pleasure. I eat when I’m hungry, and sleep when I’m tired. My body knows best and we are finally enjoying a symbiotic relationship which is benefiting us both (my body and my head) in a reciprocal snowballing way.

 

3rd at Roth 2007- ran the fastest run on the day. 2:44

 

**This year here in Boulder, USA, I have been able to, (lucky enough to) spend some good time with Chris McCormack. He is a legend, and training and talking with him certainly increases my desire to succeed, become the best, follow his footsteps, and beat him before he retires :lol: He is extremely motivating, and more than willing to help others come up and succeed as he has done. A true successful sportsman and gentleman. I never thought I would have an idol, but now that I do, chasing him will only help me succeed.

 

In conclusion, you have to know what you want, how you’re going to get it, and enjoy life while following your chosen path. If there’s an opportunity to do something, do it. Take an extra day off training and relax. Love life, and enjoy feeling fit and healthy.

 

Take it easy

 

Pete Jacobs

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Hey Greyman,

 

Contacted Molina some time ago at the request of the Dwarf. His reply is pasted below;

 

Dude! Its probably time you went to see a Urologist to get the big chop!

5 is a lifetime of work plus some.

 

> We are doing OK over here on this bleak little freezing wasteland in the

> middle of the artic ocean. Just got back from a nice trip to Europe and

> already planning how to get away next winter.

>

> Thanks for the offer to chat but I'm already on this machine more than I

> should be and have just accepted an offer to write for slowtwitch.com

> again and can't even seem to get that done. So No more forums for me!

>

> Cheers,

> Scott

 

 

 

Note on Molina - he reads this site from time to time. One of the things he wrote of on his blog recently caught my eye with regard to how he keeps himself motviated for the sport after all these years. He reads or watches on Tv something to do with triathlon every day. I'm sure if he feels motviavted to post something here he will.

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I haven't been on here for a longtime, but have really enjoyed reading this.

 

Jabs you do have talent mate, that's why you have achieved what you did in the sport and also the job.

 

Macca, thanks for the account about Sean, I miss him to as he was a mate of mine too and I loved his company. He never had a bad word to say about anyone, even his foe and that made him very special. Also don't forget he knocked me off in that race at Sans Souci and he to this day is the only leader of any race that I was second in, that high fived me and said, "Go Gozza" that was Sean he was not out to beat anyone, just win the race. Vale Sean I miss you mate.

 

Mick you were the most hard arsed trainer I ever had the opportunity to train with. I wish we could do it all again as those times in the 80's and 90's were unreal, how much fun did we have while everyone else was at work! Training with you and those other loons only benifited my racing that's for sure. My results only came about because you guys accepted me as a friend and taught me so much.

 

Thanks for the elightening reading girls and boys, just don't forget to have a beer togerther as friends more often.

 

Glenn

Edited by Glenn Gorick

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Ok Gimmilli here it is. Will keep it pretty short and basic. Hope it makes sence.

 

*  First heard of triathlon in 1986 when my Friend Clinton barter started doing them.

 

* First watched a triathlon on TV in 1987 when Dave Scott beat Mark Allen in the Hawaii Ironman. My first thought was wow, that looks really cool.

 

*My entire life i wanted to be a Marathon Champion like Deek and Moneghetti.

 

* I met Sean Maroney in 1989 at the Southside Masters Thursday night running meet. All the triathletes would come to this run.

 

*Sean gave me my history lesson in the sport as his brother was a very good Triathlete and they had all the Triathlon Videos at their home. We would watch all these races, read all the magazines and Sean would tell me all about this sport.

 

*In November 1992 I did my first Triathlon, the Diahatsu Wollongong Triathlon and won the junior category and a trip to New Caledonia. i was hooked.

 

*Raced Junior Worlds in Manchester 1993 and finished 4th decided then and thier i wanted to be a proffessional triathlete.

 

*Returned to Australia to finish University. Sean and myslef wrote a list of al the races in the World we were going to win in our career. I still have this list to this day.

 

*Sean and I would tell anybody who listened that we were going to be the best triathletes in the World. Some of the shire guys did not like our arrogance but we did not care. Greg Welch was the king of the shire and king of the world, and we would try and race him at every chance we could get. You got this chance every Tuesday and thursday morning in the triathlon pack rides, and every wednesday night at the club run.

 

*Maybe we were dillusional, but We lived it and I really wanted to be the best in the World. Sean enjoyed the party scene more than the discipline that was required with training and would often miss sessions. I was determined to beat Greg Welch one day. That was my aim. i thought if you could beat Greg Welch you would be the best in the World.

 

*Formula 1 Triathlon started in 1995 and the St George Series and this really made us focus on training and set a goal close to home. I qualified for the series in 1995 with other shire locals, Greg welch, Jason Metters and Jason Harper. Some of the older guys who were always putting myself and Sean down and tried their arse off to get into this series and failed to qualify, gave us a hard time because we got our arse kicked on TV. I did not care. We were in the seeries and they were not.

 

* Finished University in 1995. Started Work at Bankers Trust. Lasted 6 months before deciding to quit and go to race proffessionally in Europe. I had made some contacts in 1993 and sold everything I owned and packed up and flew to Europe with my girlfriend. We just bummed and and lived out of a suitcase.

 

*Finished 6th in the Paris ITU World Cup in July 1996 - Won 2500 dollars. Thought i was the richest guy in the world.

 

*2 weeks later won the ITU World Cup race in Drummondville Canada - Won 10 000 dollars. We were rich.

 

* Qualified for my first Australia Team to race World Championships in Cleveland. Met Miles Stewart on this trip. Team was, Miles, Welch, Beven, Bennett, Me, Trench, Knowles. Finished 18th place. Talked to miles. He convinced me to return to Australia and move to the Gold Coast to train under his father. I agreed, flew home and was on the Gold Coast 2 weeks after worlds.

 

*Learned how to train and the importance of consistency under the guidance of Col. At this point in time this was the best training group in Australia. It was awesome. realised as Col used to say it, Cronulla was a great place to relax but not to train. The cronulla triathlon culture was not good for a proffessional athlete.

 

*Immediately improved and had an incredible 1996-97 Australian domestic Season. Finished 4th in the F1 series and won Australian Sprin title and Australian Triathlon series. Finished 2nd at Australian Championships to Brad Beven. Started ticking off some of the races on the list that Sean and I had written out 3 years before.

 

*Won the first two rounds of the 1997 ITU World Cup series- moved back to south of France for season. Broke up with Girlfriend and got angry at the world.

 

* Raced well on World Cup ciruit-ranked number 1 in World.

 

*moved back to Sutherland Shire in september to prepare for World Champs. Trained hard with Sean Maroney and Clinton Barter to try and win World title.

 

*Won World title in november 1997. Won World Cup series.

 

* Won 4 more World Cup races in 1998-99 - Ranked number 1 in the World for 3 years.

 

*mother passed away from breast cancer April 1999 - Contemplated retirement. Stopped training and did not go to Australian Training camp in Europe. Sean Maroney and Mick Gilliam talked me back into training to get me back in the right frame of mind.  Started training in August for ITU Worlds in Montreal.

 

* Missed Olympic selection in April 2000 - Contemplated retirment. Met my wife and decided to go to America and complete the list of races I had written out with Sean. Sean joined me in the USA later that year and watched me win San Diego international Triathlon and Chicago Triathlon. These were two races that were won by his sporting Idol Mike Pigg. We sat in the otel rooms like two kids looking at the trophys and Sean telling me who had won these races in the past. These were great times. This made me want to win more of these races and put my name next to the great champions of this sport. As Sean would always say - This is your time to shine man.

 

*Moved in with michellie Jones in San Diego. Learned what a professional athlete was. She taught me so much and matured me as an athlete. Incredibe learning curve here. The most professional athlete i have ever been associated with.

 

*Went on a rampage of racing - Winning 32 races and staying undefeated for 2/1/2 years. Spoke with Sean as we ticked the races of the list.

 

*Won the Goodwill Games in 2001 after Crashing at Worlds in Canada. Qualified for Commonwealth Games. Decided the ITU circuit was not for me. I was enjoying the racing in the USA and was dictating my own future, and not bing reliant on the decisions of Triathlon Australia. Also starting to make a very healthy living from the sport in the USA.

 

*Decided to move across to Ironman in 2002 with debut in Australia. Foster was one of the races on my list of races to win. Did that in April. Spoke with Sean who was in the USa at the time after the race. He was losing his mind.

 

*Sean passed away june 2002. Was supposed to come and watch me race in Alcatraz. Won a record 4th Alcatraz title and dedicated this win to Sean. Incredibly emotional race for me as it was Mike Piggs Record i was breaking and this was Seans Idol and this was why he was coming to watch this race.

 

*Raced Commonwealth Games in August - Informed Triathlon Australia that i would not be looking at Athens as an athlete. I wanted to win Hawaii as this was what Sean and i had discussed our entire lives. I wanted to complete the list.

 

*Raced Hawaii and failed in 2002, 2003, 2004

 

*Broke 8 hours in the Ironman - Ticked that off the list. Won Roth which was also on the list we had made.

 

*Married in 2004 to Emma - jane - Daughter Tahlia born in 2004/Sienna born 2006

* Here we are now still chasing two final things on our list. Once this is achieved i will frame this crumpled piece of A4 paper and put this up in my pool room. This has become my life and my driving force. I feel fortunate and proud that I never gave up the chase and aim to complete this list for myself and to complete a dream that two teenage kids talked about in a TV Room as youngsters. I want to show my children to have the courage and the belief that dreams are worth chasing. A dream becomes a goal when you write it down on paper and goals are worth setting and chasing.

 

You ask what you need to succeed well in this sport. I believe the most important thing you need is a solid support team and a team that you believe in. I have had this my entire career. You cannot second guess your support team. Many people will tell you your doing things wrong or give you all the reasons why you should be doing things a different way. You need to believe in your team and believe in what your doing. It is this that you will draw on when the going gets tough and if you doubt this then you have nothing.

 

You need to have a sound belief that you can do it and the courage to chase your dreams. Along the way you will always have the knockers and the ones who draw huge satisfaction out of your failures. Distance yourself from these people. They dont understand that the real losers are the ones who dont have the courage or the conviction to actually try and achieve a goal. They are usually these people themselves.

 

You need to have good discipline and work ethic but be smart enough to understand the fine balance of this sport. Triathlon is a single sport that requires training in 3 disciplines. Many people forget this important fact.

 

Jabba says you need to be angry. I agree I always raced well on anger but it needs to be centred and focused. Anger projected the wrong way can be distructive.

 

I think the basic key to success is belief, discipline and consistency.

 

300954[/snapback]

 

 

 

 

Having read this ,for I think the 4th or 5th time , it is just so inspiring to re-read.

Setting goals and achieving them is one thing. But setting so many and strategically knocking them off one by one is exceptional.

 

This would make one hell of a movie !

 

Very happy you got it Chris !

 

 

:lol:

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Ok Gimmilli here it is. Will keep it pretty short and basic. Hope it makes sence.

 

*  First heard of triathlon in 1986 when my Friend Clinton barter started doing them.

 

* First watched a triathlon on TV in 1987 when Dave Scott beat Mark Allen in the Hawaii Ironman. My first thought was wow, that looks really cool.

 

*My entire life i wanted to be a Marathon Champion like Deek and Moneghetti.

 

* I met Sean Maroney in 1989 at the Southside Masters Thursday night running meet. All the triathletes would come to this run.

 

*Sean gave me my history lesson in the sport as his brother was a very good Triathlete and they had all the Triathlon Videos at their home. We would watch all these races, read all the magazines and Sean would tell me all about this sport.

 

*In November 1992 I did my first Triathlon, the Diahatsu Wollongong Triathlon and won the junior category and a trip to New Caledonia. i was hooked.

 

*Raced Junior Worlds in Manchester 1993 and finished 4th decided then and thier i wanted to be a proffessional triathlete.

 

*Returned to Australia to finish University. Sean and myslef wrote a list of al the races in the World we were going to win in our career. I still have this list to this day.

 

*Sean and I would tell anybody who listened that we were going to be the best triathletes in the World. Some of the shire guys did not like our arrogance but we did not care. Greg Welch was the king of the shire and king of the world, and we would try and race him at every chance we could get. You got this chance every Tuesday and thursday morning in the triathlon pack rides, and every wednesday night at the club run.

 

*Maybe we were dillusional, but We lived it and I really wanted to be the best in the World. Sean enjoyed the party scene more than the discipline that was required with training and would often miss sessions. I was determined to beat Greg Welch one day. That was my aim. i thought if you could beat Greg Welch you would be the best in the World.

 

*Formula 1 Triathlon started in 1995 and the St George Series and this really made us focus on training and set a goal close to home. I qualified for the series in 1995 with other shire locals, Greg welch, Jason Metters and Jason Harper. Some of the older guys who were always putting myself and Sean down and tried their arse off to get into this series and failed to qualify, gave us a hard time because we got our arse kicked on TV. I did not care. We were in the seeries and they were not.

 

* Finished University in 1995. Started Work at Bankers Trust. Lasted 6 months before deciding to quit and go to race proffessionally in Europe. I had made some contacts in 1993 and sold everything I owned and packed up and flew to Europe with my girlfriend. We just bummed and and lived out of a suitcase.

 

*Finished 6th in the Paris ITU World Cup in July 1996 - Won 2500 dollars. Thought i was the richest guy in the world.

 

*2 weeks later won the ITU World Cup race in Drummondville Canada - Won 10 000 dollars. We were rich.

 

* Qualified for my first Australia Team to race World Championships in Cleveland. Met Miles Stewart on this trip. Team was, Miles, Welch, Beven, Bennett, Me, Trench, Knowles. Finished 18th place. Talked to miles. He convinced me to return to Australia and move to the Gold Coast to train under his father. I agreed, flew home and was on the Gold Coast 2 weeks after worlds.

 

*Learned how to train and the importance of consistency under the guidance of Col. At this point in time this was the best training group in Australia. It was awesome. realised as Col used to say it, Cronulla was a great place to relax but not to train. The cronulla triathlon culture was not good for a proffessional athlete.

 

*Immediately improved and had an incredible 1996-97 Australian domestic Season. Finished 4th in the F1 series and won Australian Sprin title and Australian Triathlon series. Finished 2nd at Australian Championships to Brad Beven. Started ticking off some of the races on the list that Sean and I had written out 3 years before.

 

*Won the first two rounds of the 1997 ITU World Cup series- moved back to south of France for season. Broke up with Girlfriend and got angry at the world.

 

* Raced well on World Cup ciruit-ranked number 1 in World.

 

*moved back to Sutherland Shire in september to prepare for World Champs. Trained hard with Sean Maroney and Clinton Barter to try and win World title.

 

*Won World title in november 1997. Won World Cup series.

 

* Won 4 more World Cup races in 1998-99 - Ranked number 1 in the World for 3 years.

 

*mother passed away from breast cancer April 1999 - Contemplated retirement. Stopped training and did not go to Australian Training camp in Europe. Sean Maroney and Mick Gilliam talked me back into training to get me back in the right frame of mind.  Started training in August for ITU Worlds in Montreal.

 

* Missed Olympic selection in April 2000 - Contemplated retirment. Met my wife and decided to go to America and complete the list of races I had written out with Sean. Sean joined me in the USA later that year and watched me win San Diego international Triathlon and Chicago Triathlon. These were two races that were won by his sporting Idol Mike Pigg. We sat in the otel rooms like two kids looking at the trophys and Sean telling me who had won these races in the past. These were great times. This made me want to win more of these races and put my name next to the great champions of this sport. As Sean would always say - This is your time to shine man.

 

*Moved in with michellie Jones in San Diego. Learned what a professional athlete was. She taught me so much and matured me as an athlete. Incredibe learning curve here. The most professional athlete i have ever been associated with.

 

*Went on a rampage of racing - Winning 32 races and staying undefeated for 2/1/2 years. Spoke with Sean as we ticked the races of the list.

 

*Won the Goodwill Games in 2001 after Crashing at Worlds in Canada. Qualified for Commonwealth Games. Decided the ITU circuit was not for me. I was enjoying the racing in the USA and was dictating my own future, and not bing reliant on the decisions of Triathlon Australia. Also starting to make a very healthy living from the sport in the USA.

 

*Decided to move across to Ironman in 2002 with debut in Australia. Foster was one of the races on my list of races to win. Did that in April. Spoke with Sean who was in the USa at the time after the race. He was losing his mind.

 

*Sean passed away june 2002. Was supposed to come and watch me race in Alcatraz. Won a record 4th Alcatraz title and dedicated this win to Sean. Incredibly emotional race for me as it was Mike Piggs Record i was breaking and this was Seans Idol and this was why he was coming to watch this race.

 

*Raced Commonwealth Games in August - Informed Triathlon Australia that i would not be looking at Athens as an athlete. I wanted to win Hawaii as this was what Sean and i had discussed our entire lives. I wanted to complete the list.

 

*Raced Hawaii and failed in 2002, 2003, 2004

 

*Broke 8 hours in the Ironman - Ticked that off the list. Won Roth which was also on the list we had made.

 

*Married in 2004 to Emma - jane - Daughter Tahlia born in 2004/Sienna born 2006

* Here we are now still chasing two final things on our list. Once this is achieved i will frame this crumpled piece of A4 paper and put this up in my pool room. This has become my life and my driving force. I feel fortunate and proud that I never gave up the chase and aim to complete this list for myself and to complete a dream that two teenage kids talked about in a TV Room as youngsters. I want to show my children to have the courage and the belief that dreams are worth chasing. A dream becomes a goal when you write it down on paper and goals are worth setting and chasing.

 

You ask what you need to succeed well in this sport. I believe the most important thing you need is a solid support team and a team that you believe in. I have had this my entire career. You cannot second guess your support team. Many people will tell you your doing things wrong or give you all the reasons why you should be doing things a different way. You need to believe in your team and believe in what your doing. It is this that you will draw on when the going gets tough and if you doubt this then you have nothing.

 

You need to have a sound belief that you can do it and the courage to chase your dreams. Along the way you will always have the knockers and the ones who draw huge satisfaction out of your failures. Distance yourself from these people. They dont understand that the real losers are the ones who dont have the courage or the conviction to actually try and achieve a goal. They are usually these people themselves.

 

You need to have good discipline and work ethic but be smart enough to understand the fine balance of this sport. Triathlon is a single sport that requires training in 3 disciplines. Many people forget this important fact.

 

Jabba says you need to be angry. I agree I always raced well on anger but it needs to be centred and focused. Anger projected the wrong way can be distructive.

 

I think the basic key to success is belief, discipline and consistency.

 

300954[/snapback]

 

 

 

 

That was by far the most inspirational thing I have ever read. Touching and motivating at the same time.

 

it was great meeting you and hanging with you at Nautica South Beach Tri this weekend. Good luck with the rest of the yr

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This was an interesting thread to read. I love hearing other people's stories and what drives them. Maybe this thread shouldn't be limited to the stories of just "fairly handy elite type triathletes" - I am sure there are plenty of people out there with a good story to tell. I hope mine is interesting to some of you.

 

I got into the sport in early 1992, when Brett Sutton saw me at the National T&F Champs. I had just run the 10,000m and as I remember it, he said to me, "You are overweight and unfit, but you are one of the gutsiest runners I have ever seen. I know you can ride a bike. I can make you a champion triathlete.”!! I had done some Duathlons in the late ‘80s and had won them all, but I wasn’t a swimmer. Part of me thought Brett was a crazy man, but another part of me was flattered and I had always wanted someone to tell me they thought I could be decent. As a kid I’d been good at everything BUT sport, so that is what I wanted to be good at! I had become a reasonable middle-distance runner in high school and had dabbled quite successfully in bike racing at Uni, but thought of myself more as someone who tried hard than someone who was talented. It took me three months to make the decision to move to the Gold Coast (from Brisbane) to train with Brett. I had just finished my second post-graduate degree in exercise physiology and back then, giving it all away to become a full-time athlete wasn’t too common (or wise!?!). Plus I had no money. It was a big risk to take. A respected colleague finally convinced me when he said, “You are 23. You have 40 years ahead of you to work. If you don’t go for it now you will never know what you can do. Give it 6-12 months and if it doesn’t work out, you have your education to fall back on”. So I took the risk. I had a couple of safety nets though – one was my education; and I also took a part time job (which Brett wasn’t happy about) and worked 2 days/week for the first two years. On 11th May 1992, I moved to the Coast with Rina Bradshaw (now Hill) and her now husband, Alistair…

 

Once I committed I was determined to make it work. I also quickly learnt to really train under Brett. In six months my 10k PB (track – where it counts!) went from 35:21 to 33:14. It still took me years to realise that I was actually quite talented and it was just that I had never trained enough as a runner – that is quantity, not quality. I never had a problem pushing myself hard! Brett very accurately described me as having an aerobic body with an anaerobic head!! I loved to go hard, but even though I went better as the distance got longer, I just never had the patience or attention span to go long. Even now I need to have 5 things going on at once – too long on any one task bores me. In recent years, running marathons (and beyond) has been a great challenge for me mentally – but my body likes it!

 

Anyway, I won the National Series in my first season (edging Rina out in the last race) and the rest is history… I only had eight years in Triathlon, retiring in 2000 at age 32. I was driven to achieve and I really did everything I set out to do and more (1G, 3S at TWC; 2G, 1B at DWC). I retired when I didn’t think I could do any more/ any better (after missing the 2000 Olympic team). On looking back and after reading the rest of this thread, it was probably all a bit too serious. I kind of wish I’d done more ‘fun races’. I probably should have gone long too. But no regrets – I am doing some of the fun (and long) things now with my running and also some other things. I also wanted to have another career and I love my work (and my husband – I have to mention him!!). I did have a great time in Triathlon – I have heaps of good memories of people, races and places. It really gave me a lot. You really don’t appreciate it fully until it is over.

 

So what drove me…? I used to not want to know the answer to that question as I thought I might lose ‘my edge’ if I knew why I was so driven. The answer though was that I just had this burning desire to be BETTER. In lots of ways I was ‘not good enough’, but most of the time I took the positive slant to this and was just driven to find ways to be better. I think this still drives me and I have a healthy life ethos of trying to be the best I can be… and then find a way to be better.

 

Another thing is that, as in the story of how I got into the sport, I was willing to take calculated risks and then I very much took responsibility for my own destiny. I need to be challenged and love to go after my goals and make them happen for myself. I had to learn (sometimes the hard way) to let other people support me and I could not have done what I did without the help of others – especially other people believing in me. I wouldn’t have had the confidence to do what I did without the belief others had in me. You need other people to both challenge you and believe in you in order to get the most out of yourself. But you ultimately need to find the drive within yourself to fully realise your potential. My greatest strength was my greatest weakness – I was very self-motivated, determined and independent, but (like most people I guess) I needed support and reassurance.

 

Early on in my running and Triathlon career I was always looking for the ‘perfect’ race and I’d often try too hard and fall in a heap. One of the best pieces of advice I ever got was that if you can look at yourself in the mirror at the end of the day and say, “I did the very best I could today with what I knew and what I had on the day”, then you have to be satisfied. You can learn from it and improve upon it, but all you have to do is your best in the moment – every moment. That thought drove and still drives me and I gain great satisfaction even now from knowing I am very good at getting the most out of myself.

 

This might all have been too long winded and not enough of a ‘story’ – but you’ll have to buy the book for the full story!!!!??!

 

The journey continues. I’m doing a bit of coaching which I love. I still run every day, and ride and swim when it moves me to do so. I turned 40 late last year and am challenged by W40 running records and by trying to find the patience to run longer. Actually I am trying to be fit enough to run longer but do it fast enough that I don’t have to take too long over it!!

 

Jackie G/F

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:lol::lol::D:D:D

 

Stand by, we are working on getting some words from Chrissie Wellington. Have sent her an email on this thread and maybe Miners has too. Hopefully she will put some thoughts together and let us know what a great champion she is and to be among the other champions on this thread.

 

Pam

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I know we wanted these tips straight from the horse's mouth - and perhaps once she and BG are based here in the Sunshine Coast, Chrissie might spend more time over here - but here's the email she sent Pam in response to this thread:

 

Hey Pam,

 

I hope you had a wonderful day in north head last week...and apologies for the delay in responding - i have been nursing a week of girls/chick flu. It's like man flu, but much much worse!!!!!!

 

Anyway, my tips are simple - and probably not what the Trannies want to hear, as they dont involve the word aero or monitor!

 

  • Remember that quality not quantity is best, when training for all distances
  • Visualise before the race - preempt what might happen, both good and bad and develop a strategy for dealing with it (don't worry about the things you cannot control, only think about the things you can).
  • Lube - for every occasion
  • Get a regular sports massage - a wonderful fine line between pleasure and pain.
  • Don't fear pain, but come to expect it and, as above, use training to develop your own mental strategy for coping. The mind and body are much stronger than you think they are.
  • Never let people set your limits - always aim high and believe that anything is possible!
  • Enjoy it and smile - its supposed to be fun!

Hope this is OK....:lol:

 

Smiles

 

Chrissie

If nothing else, don't ever dismiss the importance of lubing peoples :lol:

Edited by miners

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Guest Mister Marsellus Wallace
MMW did you ever race against Ian Ross back and the day and how did you rate him

as a triathlete.

 

Rossy and I stayed together the year we did Hawaii in 1989 he won the 18-19 year age cat at Forster that year I think to get his spot, and he was very very good and acquitted himself well in a lot of races over the years. He now contents himself playing soccer with the Caringbah Redbacks old bastards soccer and his son went to kindy with mine. His wife is probably fitter than he is these days I always see her running.

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Rossy and I stayed together the year we did Hawaii in 1989 he won the 18-19 year age cat at Forster that year I think to get his spot, and he was very very good and acquitted himself well in a lot of races over the years. He now contents himself playing soccer with the Caringbah Redbacks old bastards soccer and his son went to kindy with mine. His wife is probably fitter than he is these days I always see her running.

 

 

MMW i was over his place the other day on a visit up to the shire and he still goes on about how he won the Japan half ironman all

those years ago, he was dustin all his old trophies off while we were havin a beer. His younger brother was also quite handy at sport.

 

Ian loves his soccer though had a year of summer soccer at engadine with him. if you ever bump into him ask him

 

who beat him at the gerringong beach fun run back in 1989.

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Guest Mister Marsellus Wallace

All my trophies are in a box in the rubbish room at me mums....

 

Rossy is a good dude. Seriously tho, there are a lot of people around these parts with various claims to fame, Olympians, sporting internationals, you name it and the one common thread about it is no one really cares once you are done, everyone is just getting on with life and pretty much every single one of them are satisfied with one thing - that their kids love em.

 

Nothing else really matters at the end of the day. Every one of them has a real job and because they were good and respected people in sport that didnt f-k people over when they had a following, they have prospered in their careers and their lives. Woolies at Caringbah is often a whose who of retired (and some current) sporting legends and their spouses and kids.

 

I guess thats why I get the shits with buffoons with a false sense of their own importance who think they are legends when ultimately it doesnt really matter, it is interesting to see how some folks go over the passage of time without arse lickers and hangers on.

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All my trophies are in a box in the rubbish room at me mums....

 

Rossy is a good dude. Seriously tho, there are a lot of people around these parts with various claims to fame, Olympians, sporting internationals, you name it and the one common thread about it is no one really cares once you are done, everyone is just getting on with life and pretty much every single one of them are satisfied with one thing - that their kids love em.

 

 

Too right i am glad i don't live up there anymore and all my old trophies were put in the bin long ago

 

I met up with Rossy down at husky earlier this year he was doin the fun run and our kids done the miniman

 

 

i got him to pose for some photos with some friends of mine kids i told them how good he used to be.

 

We all get older and wiser

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This is a great thread. I have really enjoyed reading some of these posts.

 

 

WOW,what a great read,thanks to all

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Was reading Macca's post in here just yesterday, love this bit in particular...

 

* Here we are now still chasing two final things on our list. Once this is achieved i will frame this crumpled piece of A4 paper and put this up in my pool room. This has become my life and my driving force. I feel fortunate and proud that I never gave up the chase and aim to complete this list for myself and to complete a dream that two teenage kids talked about in a TV Room as youngsters. I want to show my children to have the courage and the belief that dreams are worth chasing. A dream becomes a goal when you write it down on paper and goals are worth setting and chasing.

 

Conor

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