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Coach@triathlon

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Coach@triathlon last won the day on February 8 2014

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About Coach@triathlon

  • Rank
    Transitions Legend!
  • Birthday 13/09/1966

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  • Location
    Shire

Previous Fields

  • Year of first Tri race?
    1982

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  1. would you recommend wearing stilletos around the house?
  2. You are measuring growth of the sport by prizemoney paid to professionals - that's just a supply/demand/market force anomaly. since the late 80s Triathlon has experienced huge competition from other niche sports - far less coverage and general interest in the wider community means Pro triathletes aren't rock stars anymore. The average bloke in the caravan park we holiday at would know the bmx, or snow boarding legend before he would recognise a kona winner. The sport has exploded participation-wise and continues to grow. The olympics has helped that along. IMO, the reason the sport 'feels' different now is it is not a singular community anymore. Everyone used to rock up to Forster to compete or watch IM Australia. People would hang out, train, compete, spectate, drink, root, and you knew most people in the sport. Now we have a completely different landscape and huge options and a range of distances - which is really cool - but like most things in life - if the focus is on the corporate at the expense of the community; then people leave in droves. One of the reasons why Mark Emerton's Races continue to thrive in NSW. I have friends who met at his races and are married now. I don't reckon I'd be doing traithlon anymore without Emo.
  3. The sport of Ironman has grown massively from a participation standpoint - the professional ranks have not grown, and the amount of training and talent required to win regularly and secure sponsorships isn't sustaining viable incomes. There is no secure income for professionals apart from the top 1 or 2 percent. It's just economics. Noone's fault. There is no entitlement for professionals to win money or for Race promoters to hand out cash. They are trying to make a living too and see no value in signing big cheques to pros for just turning up and going fast. The 80s were a great time and we were young and the sport was exciting and small. The media were also interested at the time and sponsors came along and splashed the cash. None of us apart from the kings like Welchie, Miles and Brad ever thought we could earn enough to retire and sit pretty. In saying that, those 3 still work for salaries and making ends meet. It is what it is.
  4. Days off are debateable - I dont take them and and dont think they are healthy generally. Every day training and exercise/movement is how we are wired. Can see the reason why they are helpful but weekly is not conducive to performance at the pointy end. No one should be giving medicinal, chemical and biological advice without tertiary qualifications and industry experience.
  5. When Clapton was asked 'what's it like to be the greatest guitarist in the world?' He replied, 'dunno, ask Prince.'
  6. Took my girls to see Superjesus. Sarah was at her hellcat best - talked to the girls in between songs and flicked out a hundred guitar picks into the crowd. They had never seen a proper rock chick before. Special. Baby Animals 3 weeks later - same deal with the rock chick thing but Suzee a bit more subdued. I bought a Fender Telecaster American pro over christmas - same model as Suzee's. Cracking axe
  7. no, not really! 200s not 400s!
  8. FP in terms of bike riding and sustaining younger levels - it can be difficult to control. I have always been ok on a bike and not really had to do a lot of traditional miles on the road. A car accident and broken neck sorted that out quick smart. I ride 4 times a week - this morning we did a turbo session of one hour. A few of us punching out intervals at varying intensities an cadences. w/u 5 to 10 mins easy spin 8 x 3 minute efforts - i minute sprint (rpm over 100) 1 minute easy 1 minute heavy climb 5 x 2 minute efforts - 2 minutes heavy (270-300 watts) 1 minute easy c/d 5 - 10 minutes easy Always with others at the gym which makes it more enjoyable. On the back of that and some other step sets and sustained efforts I can still punch out a reasonable 20k in a sprint race or 40k in a standard. Once I ride the national park once a week and add that in if there is a big race coming up I go to another level again - but that is rare because the kids dominate our time on the weekends. In short, you have to do the threshold work as a 50+ athlete or the decline will be a lot faster. I swim 4x a week between 2.5-3k. Only look at the clock once a week. I'll do a set of 12 x 200 on 3 minutes coming in between 2.30-2.40. the other sessions I swim as i feel. Some swims are akin to drowning while others can be quality. I enjoy the swimming and it's a key activity as we get older. All the training only adds up to 8 or 9 hours a week and never impacts upon the kids. I wanted to race forster this weekend but kids have too much hockey. Next one will be Port Stephens or possibly Wollongong in April.
  9. try different running and work shoes. stopped 5 years of calf and achilles problems for me overnight.
  10. swam with Telf on sunday. the great man in his 70s now. Still punches out 3k 4 x a week
  11. Justine and I saw them at Nowra on Australia Day. Special
  12. People have different goals coming into triathlon - its never generic. One of the enjoyments of coaching without being encumbered by the need for financial reward is you can choose who you want to coach. I enjoy coaching people that enjoy the sport and the moment each session. It's more social for us, with a stand up comedy act during the session, and a good workout is covered. Some race ironman and some sprint, some do those long run in the bush things, and others come for fitness. either way it is healthy and meaningful. Triathlon has an underbelly with the absurd constructs of Ironman elitism and how many age group wins you have or Kona qualifications. To be fair most of it just resides in small amounts on forums and in white middle aged males minds. I go to races regularly and never come across some of the arguing over who commits the most hours, dead beat parenting, discipline, and balance - those that actually enjoy triathlon do it - enjoy it - and are egalitarian live and let live. AP lost me at the 401 ease up at 390 metre analogy - geezuz really?
  13. Wise words AP - consistent discipline is the one thing missing in most triathletes personalities and characters. I wonder how many triathletes would be self-effacing enough to admit they don't have the required discipline to enjoy triathlon as a competitive sport and a lifestyle that adds value rather than takes away from their lives?
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