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Paul Every

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Everything posted by Paul Every

  1. Paul Every

    50 Ironmans in 50 days Ashley Horner

    Yes, her 323km of swimming in just 30 days last November raised just shy of $6500. https://www.mightycause.com/story/Gr9f8f https://wtkr.com/2017/11/08/local-athlete-takes-on-201-mile-swim-24-hour-wod-all-for-charity/ I have no doubts about her ability to raise funds or to the unfortunate plight of Haitian orphans, however....
  2. Paul Every

    50 Ironmans in 50 days Ashley Horner

    I'm pretty confident we will. With the amount of scrutiny and interest she has attracted, we should definitely see what she is capable of. Where her capabilities lie on on a scale from impressive to disappointing is a very different question.
  3. Paul Every

    50 Ironmans in 50 days Ashley Horner

    This isn't Ironman. If she is approximating any legitimate race it is one of ultra triathlon formats. So taking sustenance on the swim (or completing the distance in longer than 17 hours) is permissible.
  4. Paul Every

    50 Ironmans in 50 days Ashley Horner

    Finally get to see how much endurance cred she has.
  5. Paul Every

    Swimming pools near Coogee

    Clovelly. OK, it's not a pool, but for a brief visit it would provide a pleasant variation to the black line. Or laps of Coogee Beach behind the breakers.
  6. Paul Every

    Swimming in Sydney CBD

    Some mornings you swim out into the blackness to discover the sparkle of phosphorescence as your hand moves through the water below you. It's just magical. I do enjoy the feeling of swimming from the night, through the first light of dawn and seeing the sun emerge over the horizon to a fine day. And seeing the shapes of the sea floor and the marine life slowly revealed by the increasing light. Such a lovely time to swim.
  7. Paul Every

    Swimming in Sydney CBD

    If the difficulty is a case of motivation rather than logistics, just get yourself down to B&B for one day. That may well be all you need to make it a regular (or at least semi-regular) thing.
  8. Paul Every

    50 Ironmans in 50 days Ashley Horner

    Well, that would also explain the shit live tracking.
  9. Paul Every

    What do you do to get away from Triathlon?

    Not sure I want to know about the gorges in your budgies, favourite or otherwise, though I hope you have enjoyable trip all the same.
  10. Paul Every

    Am I turning into a right winger?

    Having a pair of X chromosomes is the normal female complement so I'm struggling to see your point.
  11. Paul Every

    50 Ironmans in 50 days Ashley Horner

    I understand where the questioner is coming from, but a valid point is being lost in them being overly pedantic. For someone undertaking a challenge like this it's pretty clear that there are plenty of IM competition rules that are irrelevant. Obviously, outside assistance is clearly essential. Likewise, the 17 hour cut-off is just not applicable to this. What she is attempting is defined by one IM each day. As long as she backs up to complete one the following day, starting and finishing times are of no concern. It's not like 17 hours is the standard cut-off in every IM staged each year. Competitors in double or triple ironman races have more than 34 or 51 hours to complete the course. It's a different ball game. Conversely, if she doesn't want people to think the athletic side of this is a fraud or at best a joke, she does require some accountability of the distances at the very least.
  12. Paul Every

    No More Soft Bike Cases On Hawiian Airlines

    Because the average Chinese, Japanese or Korean weighs 13kg less than the average Aussie or Seppo? 🤔
  13. Paul Every

    Hardrock 100 DQs leader

    "we will enforce this rule. Before next year's race, we will also state, in writing, what the penalties are for breaking this rule." Tarawera isn't until March. The organisers have hardly left themselves open to anything. Certainly not yet. Considering it's already being discussed by the organisers, it sounds likely that they'll be well on top of it. All they've done is publicly that it is a rule that will be addressed over the next 8 months, competitors will be notified of the changes in writing and the rule will be enforced. Possibly they've had a few queries this week on the issue from runners and rather than replying to several similar emails or fb queries or are looking to avoid repeatedly having the same conversation with runners if they're hanging out at an ultra this weekend. It's just a "Hey, guys, we're on to this. Sit tight, you'll know well before you hit the start line in 2019." They acknowledged that in some cases the rule may be difficult to enforce if it comes down to a he-said/she-said situation, but that's reasonable. It's no different to a tri RD saying a disqualification requires more substantive proof than someone saying "I saw competitor #103 drafting between 100 and 105km on the bike leg." Or am I missing your point and you mean Hardrock is leaving themselves open?
  14. Paul Every

    Tough run? check this out

    Any race with around 3000 metres of climbing in 50km is guaranteed to be an awesome day out. There are so many gnarly races popping up the world over now days, with Europe leading the way. I haven't raced Buffalo, though the men's and women's course records for the "uphill" and "downhill" marathon courses are fairly similar despite the differential of about 1000 metres. Uphill course has about 3000 of climb and 2000 of descent, downhill obviously the reverse. The comparability of times indicates one thing; a highly technical course where even for the best runners, hazardous descending is about as slow as the lung-sucking climbing.
  15. Paul Every

    Hardrock 100 DQs leader

    Not sure it sounds at all premeditated. iRunFar: Was it your crew [at Bear Creek Trailhead who aided you]? Thévenard: Yes, but it wasn’t planned. We didn’t even think about it. I didn’t even think about doing something bad. I had too many things to manage with the pain, it didn’t cross my mind one second
  16. Paul Every

    Hardrock 100 DQs leader

    No, it's very easy to make any number of mistakes when you are that close to the end of your tether. Navigation, footing, leaving some supplies at an aid station or forgetting to pick up something you need. Just so happens that some mistakes put a runner or crew or breach of the rules. This isn't Ironman. Or even any 100km ultra we would be familiar with in Aust. Hardrock is a whole different dimension of exhaustion. 100 miles, sleep deprivation, insanely long climbs and brutal, technical descents, all at altitude.
  17. Paul Every

    Hardrock 100 DQs leader

    Easy to imagine. Vehicle open with esky in the back. Runner and crew talking for 5 minutes. Runner hot and thirsty. Well-meaning but tired crew member just hands the runner a bottle and some ice and the runner just takes it without either of them thinking. Easy not to think things through at the back end of a 100 miler.
  18. Paul Every

    Hardrock 100 DQs leader

    Yes, sounds like a just a mistake from a fatigued runner and/or possibly tired crew. I could imagine there was a road crossing where the crew stopped to cheer him on, he stopped for a chat and was passed or picked up a drink without thinking. There are only 5 aid stations at Hardrock where crew may meet their runner to supply them with aid. The other 8 aid stations have no crew access (some have the supplies carried in by the volunteers, ie hike in, others are 4WD access only). No aid stashes or crewing between stations.
  19. Paul Every

    50 Ironmans in 50 days Ashley Horner

    Solid for sure. Would be worth doing brick sessions every day.
  20. Paul Every

    50 Ironmans in 50 days Ashley Horner

    http://theoatmeal.com/comics/runners_vs_goats
  21. Paul Every

    50 Ironmans in 50 days Ashley Horner

    The local ultra scene still has a lot of that, though there certainly has been a few coaches specialising in the long stuff cropping up in recent years. Some very good ones too.
  22. Paul Every

    50 Ironmans in 50 days Ashley Horner

    Talay's running shop in Randwick? Wednesdays, 6:15 pm, 10 miles either south to Maroubra or north to Bondi?
  23. Paul Every

    50 Ironmans in 50 days Ashley Horner

    You'll love this then: How to take 6 minutes to say "do back-to-back long runs".
  24. Paul Every

    50 Ironmans in 50 days Ashley Horner

    She also claims to have run 280 mile/450km in 5 days from Virginia Beach to Wrightsville Beach in 2016. Though a few things in this interview make me feel uneasy. Mark: Okay, so 280 miles. How did that look? Like how many miles did you run a day? ‘Cause that seems like a pretty long run. Ashley: So the first day was my easiest day. It was 30 miles, and I ran from the gym, American Sled Dogs to the North Carolina border. And maybe it was a little over 30 miles, but it was amazing, and that forever changed me. And I don’t think that… there was one maybe 2 days where I was running by myself, solo. The other days I would have safety runners or Erin, who is like my best friend. She does… we do business together. She’s my manager now. She ran some of it with me. And then my captain from the Unbroken Foundation, Renee Adams, ran some of it with me as well. But that was probably the toughest thing that I have ever done. Every morning, it got to the point probably day 3, day 4–I ran for 5 days–and like I couldn’t even sleep at night because my body was just in such pain. Mark: Wait, you only ran 5 days? If I divide 280 by 5, I mean that’s more than 50 miles a day. Ashley: Mm-hmm. So there was… maybe it was 6 days. ‘Cause I got in on Saturday. So, yeah, some of my days that I ran were 50 miles straight. One of them was maybe like 55 miles. But the 30 mile run was my shortest run. But it was really hard. My feet swelled to 2 and half shoe sizes bigger, so that was something that I wasn’t planning on that… Thankfully I have Reebok as one of my big sponsors now. And so they were able to get me some more shoes, stat. But I… like my feet swelled, I had a doctor who had to come out and look at me one night because I thought I had like a stress fracture in one of my feet. Which was fine. I remember, I looked at it, and I was like, “Well, is it going to get any worse if I run on it?” And she was like, “I don’t think so. It’s not going to get any worse.” And I was like, “Okay, I’m gonna run. Unless it’s… if it’s not a break I’m fine to run. Anyways, so I put myself, my body through hell. But every moment of it was worth it. We had a goal to raise 15,000 dollars because the shelter down in North Carolina needed a new roof. And we raised… I shouldn’t say “we,” it was you guys–everybody helping me–we raised 18,000 dollars. It was so amazing. And I think I cried everyday, just ’cause. Mark: I bet. That’s so cool. Did you train for this? Or were you confident enough from your functional fitness to just jump into it? Ashley: You know, I don’t personally do training really. Some would probably argue with me on that. But I think it gets to a point where it’s not really about training anymore physically. It’s about training your mind. And knowing that no matter what, you know… and I kept thinking that it doesn’t matter the pain that I’m about to go through. These women and who I’m raising the money for, they have scars that I can’t even compare. I don’t have anything to show for that pain that they have. And so it kept pushing me through to the end.” https://unbeatablemind.com/ashley-horner/ Seriously, who runs 450 km and not know how long it takes them? Especially fairly inexperienced runners who would remember the details well. And apparently she doesn't really train. The difference between running 80 km a day and the 120+km/day claimed for the Haiti run is enormous. With a high online profile and promotion, when a 370km run gets ugly at 2am on an unlit Haitian road, it's easy to imagine the funding needs of the orphanage being of greater precedence than maintaining the integrity of the athletic performance, particularly for an inexperienced and undertrained runner. Over the years, I've seen too many dubious solo charity runners with poor (if any) competitive records not to smell a rat with this.
  25. Paul Every

    50 Ironmans in 50 days Ashley Horner

    That's if she ran 370 km in 3 days. Just doing a bit of reading on her running, self-promotion appears to take precedence over performance or accountability. From her account of a double crossing of the Grand Canyon: The last 10 miles were the hardest and the final 4 miles we climbed 6,000 feet. I have never in my life felt so ever enduring pain & the truth is that my physical ability ended about mile 38 as my body began to shut down. A lot of you are curious how much training I did for this, the furthest distance I had ran was 15 miles… No training could replicate or prepare me for what I went through out there. that stream of tears that rolled down my cheeks when I reached the final rim was the happiest and greatest feeling of achievement I have felt. Very very special thanks to Quest Nutrition for believing in me, the Ashley Horner Foundation and my entire running crew! We did it and we accomplished something that even less than 1% of Ultra Runners attempt annually. Except the trails out of Grand Canyon don't ascend that steeply. On the North Rim it's about 3000 feet in the last 4.7 miles, and on the South Rim, 4000 feet for the final 4.4 miles of the South Kaibab Trail and about 3000 feet for the last 4.8 miles of the Bright Angel Trail. https://www.rimtorim.org/hike-it/ Training does prepare you for exactly what she went through. That's why you do it. Sure, only a small percentage ultra runners may attempt it each year, but at 67 or 75 km (depending on the route taken) of reasonably well maintained trail, it's achievable by the overwhelming majority of ultra runners.
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