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Greyman

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Greyman last won the day on September 8 2014

Greyman had the most liked content!

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About Greyman

  • Rank
    Transitions Legend!
  • Birthday 25/05/1962

Contact Methods

  • MSN
    Greyman_dude@hotmail.com
  • Website URL
    http://www.wstc.org.au
  • ICQ
    0

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Melvegas on the banks of the Yarra
  • Interests
    Lots of things.

Previous Fields

  • Year of first Tri race?
    1985

Recent Profile Visitors

437 profile views
  1. Scheduling strength training

    Cranky, I know you do wind trainer sessions on the bike a few mornings each week. Adding some strength exercises before or after your workout is a good way to fit it in.
  2. Artial Fibrillation: anyone? Mental side?

    Mate, as GSP says, good luck mate. Keep a positive attitude as best you can.
  3. Geelong 70.3 Enter now

    F&@k me, I'm a gonna have to get a camera on the motorbike so we can get some vision of Pete going for it at Geelong.
  4. Scheduling strength training

    BF, I'm going to bypass the previous discussions, rants and theories. All have positive points and contestable points. The questions you ask are considered by nearly every triathlete if they stay in this sport long enough. Do I need to do strength training and how do I fit it into my weekly schedule. Trying to fit 3 workouts in each sport into one week is hard enough. Trying to add strength training just complicates your scheduling. But there is benefit in pursuing strength training if you have the time and the right reasons for doing it. its best to speak to a professional in person about your strength training requirements. When to fit it into your schedule only takes a bit of lateral thinking and time management. Every week presents you with opportunity to exercise around your daily schedule. If like most people you only have before and after work and weekends to exercise, then you are going to be hard pushed to fit in a visit to a gym without impacting your SBR training. You're better off focusing on your SBR training and complimenting that with core and body weight exercises you can do at home in your spare time ( this is Sutto's message to age groupers). if you're like me and have a little flexibility in your weekly schedule, a visit to the gym twice a week, especially as you get older is worth it. I go to the gym on Mondays and Thursday's at lunchtime and do a routine that I have developed with a trainer to suit my needs. Those needs are to enable me to train for swim, bike and run and continue to do so into the future. The gym session dont replace swimming, biking or running. The functional strength training I do for swim, bike and run are done during swim, bike and run sessions. I've found the gym sessions beneficial in keeping my alignment and balance across muscle groups. It's good preventative maintenance. The only time I drop the gym sessions is when I'm traveling for work, traveling back from a race or when I'm doing manual labour on yet another renovation project.
  5. Running faster by running slower. Tips please

    Roxi, Can't help you with the awkward technique solution but can direct you where you might find some answers. if you want to go to the source of this idea for running training, search for Arthur Lydiard on running. Or the Lydiard running technique. Lydiard was a NZ athletics coach who, while he didn't invent this training method, he did perfect it to a point that most of today's modern training methods for running are still based on His formula. Lydiard had great success with training track and distance runners. Pat Clohessy who was Rob De Castellas coach, drew heavily from Lydiards method. I think Cloehessy described it best in finding the non awkward way to run slower than your normal rhythm in order to get faster. hope you find the answer you are looking for.
  6. Geelong 70.3 Enter now

    I will probably be on course somewhere on the motorbike. There will be coffee and donuts onboard,........... But not for you,grasshopper! Hahaha
  7. Cycling kits. What's yours and why

    Yeah I go with the Jaggard gear and 17 hours stuff for cycling. I've tried the Nalini gear and it lasted for ages, but can't find it for a decent price these days. As you're a taller guy with a set of shoulder ( like me) steer clear of the Ventou stuff. You won't find much of their cycling gear to fit you.
  8. RunWith Opening - 13th January, 2018

    There's no way in hell I will ever get to your store in person, mostly because it's in Sydney and I just don't frequent the place. However, I will be lurking online and checking out what's on offer. Good luck with the venture.
  9. 2017 Totals - training / racing / stuffing around

    Between January and April I raced 7 times. One 70.3. 4 Olympic Dist and 2 Sprint races.. May, June, July and August I had a complete break for the first time in 32 years. Normally I would do some form of light exercise during my annual "month off" but this time I did absolutely no exercise (except walk the dumb dog). Result of break - my AC joints and tendons in my shoulders stopped aching, the seperated bone in. my foot finally healed., my lowered back loosened up and my brain had a good rest. My desire to train and compete returned in September. Totals swim - SWFA Bike - SWFA Run - less than SWFA!
  10. Leg shaving....

    If you have any doubt about shaving. Have an off on your bike and get some road rash on those hairy legs. I guarantee that once you've recovered and the scabs have finally gone, you will be reaching for the razors. The aero benefits while cycling are just a bonus.
  11. Volunteered and worked at the Melbourne Comm games. Great experience. Recommend it to anyone.
  12. So froome is a drug cheat

    Think you're right.
  13. Taking a break

    When I was younger, I used to have injury enforced breaks. But after about 7 years of training and competing, I had a month off during May while on a family holiday. Conveniently May also was right after the tri season ended. I found it was good for the body and my head because after about three weeks I was looking forward to getting back to doing some training. After discussing off seasons with various other triathletes I knew, I decided to try having a month off after the next season and found it was good for the body and brain. So ive continued that until this year. This year I had a longer break, 3 months to allow a broken bone in my foot to properly heal and give the body a decent rest. What I learned along the way is the two biggest concerns if you don't have a break, is burnout and chronic fatigue syndrome. I've seen a lot of people come and go from the sport with burnout and worse still at least 30 athletes develop CFS. My advice is to look at scheduling some down time at the end of the season and look after your health.
  14. IMNZ 2018

    Great race. Everyone has their opinion on the road surface and the hills. I'm no great hill climber on the bike and I didn't struggle on that course. So it's not a toughly. I enjoyed the swim, had a bit of fun on the bike and remember the great crowd support on the run. All of my race experience could have been a lot worse if I'd let it be. The year I competed, it poured rain and the wind blew from before the race start, to well after the midnight finish time. The swim was the warmest I felt all day, I finished the bike with mild hyperthermia but shook it off after getting moving on the run and having a chuck or two which settled the nausea. It could have been good material for a moaning bitch fest, but the race organisers and volunteers just wouldn't let that happen. Their support and simple actions, like having warm soup at a few aid stations, meant competitors were given every opportunity to get to the finish regardless of the poor weather. Youve got to love an experience like that and it did make the achievement feel a bit more special. Go and do the race. You won't regret it,
  15. Rule Changes

    do they understand that a Garmin or similar 'toy' uses satellite communication and is just as distracting as headphones or a phone. FFS, as Pete says, get the real problems like drafting and course cutting fixed first. if you really want to keep people in the sport, let them use as many gizmos as they like to show all the data about their performance that they desire. Then work out how TA, WTC and anyone else can get a slice of the action by licensing, branding or similar of those products. How many people would see the name ironman if it was licensed or tagged in Garmin uploads to Strava? Lots....
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