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bRace

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About bRace

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    Transitions Addict in Progress

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  • Year of first Tri race?
    1991

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130 profile views
  1. So froome is a drug cheat

    In Froome's case it clearly wasn't fior the muscle mass benefits
  2. Who's trying to qualify for itu worlds?

    Definitely TT. Fast, flat straights make up for the u-turns. Roundabout can be taken at speed as well. OD weekend at Robina has been less congested using the 8km loop compared to the normal sprint done on the 5km loop, in my experience. Maybe I was just lucky. The bad congestion is in the coffee and dunny queues.
  3. Help building a 70.3 plan

    Not sure what you're background fitness and training etc (i.e. how much training base you already have) is but you might be selling yourself short with your goal times based on training time. I'm very much MOP (mens 40-44) at 70.3 and just look to get around fairly comfortably. I aim for 3 rides (maybe swap a brick in), 2 runs, and 1 swim (maybe 2 in the final few weeks) per week. That looks like: bike - 1 x long, easy ride 2-3 hrs, 2 x 1hr rides (1 x hills, 1 x intervals or tempo). run - 1 x long, easy run 1-1.5hrs, 1 x 45mins-1hr run (prob hills earlier in program, intervals later) swim - 1 x 1500-2000m including a few drills etc. The vast majority of that is in zone 2 HR, with the intervals (1-2km run efforts etc) only really being in the last month or so. That's probably around 5-10 hrs a week increasing over about 3-4mths, which suits the amount of time I'm willing to invest and my level of seriousness. It also keeps me injury free and probably a long way from being overly fatigued. On race day for me it means a 33min swim, 2.40 bike and prob 1.50ish run. I keep it pretty simple, but like i said I'm not racing for the podium. If you like the training etc and want to maximise your chance of a good time etc, definitely invest as much time as you can and I think you'll probably go better than the times you've suggested for yourself. My main point would be to not overcomplicate it and tailor your training volume to the results your looking for.
  4. Points required for world age group team

    I planned to try to qualify for sprint, until too much sun exposure ended that goal. My choice of sprint over OD was based on my relative performance in each. QTS sprints here have around 50-70 in my age group and I usually finish around top 10. I assume series in other states are similar, so even with stronger fields at qualifying races, I figure I''d probably still get some points and then it might come down to how many races I do to accumulate enough. OD on the other hand, such as Mooloolaba, have about 250-300 in my age group and I usually finish back around 80-100.... well out of any points. So for me, I would have been zero chance for OD, but sprint was a possibility depending on how much travel I was prepared to do.
  5. Wearing cycling gloves

    I hear you Flanman. I'm sporting a 9 week old skin graft after melanoma removal from the back of my wrist. For info, mine was pink, so don't just look for nasty dark ones. It was checked by two different docs who both thought it was nothing to worry about.
  6. I agree with all above. Go do it, have fun and be proud of your effort. People do this sport for all different reasons whether it be to win, having fun doing something active, or to overcome challenges life dishes up, or whatever. I'd say most people at races are supportive and have a mutual respect for each other because of a shared interest in the sport and recognition of effort, regardless of how long they're on the course. There might even be more support for those out on the course longer, because people understand the individual effort is just as hard but goes on for a longer time. Good luck with it all.
  7. Is there a decent beach or lake for a long swim

    Wivenhoe's about 30mins from Ipswich, down the Brisbane Valley HWY through Fernvale. Plenty of decent campgrounds at the lake. Small towns nearby, but not sure if there's much accom in them. They used to run an OD there a few years back and just used the roads at the lake, but there are plenty of country roads around to go longer.
  8. Noosa Tri 2017

    Agreed. I loved when the women's pro race used to be Sunday arvo after the age groupers. Few relaxing beers post race while watching world class athletes go round was a great end to the weekend.
  9. Noosa Tri 2017

    Both good races and good weekends/weeks at the beach. I probably prefer Mooloolaba slightly more for a few reasons. I like the course, especially the swim and ride. I haven't done Noosa with the ocean swim but I assume that's also good. I only really like the Noosa ride for the section between Tewantin and Cooroy. Like Chappy019 says, Noosa has a bit more buzz about it. It's probably a more iconic tourist destination and there's always a lot of 'celebs' of either sport or non-sport backgrounds, for those who enjoy that sort of thing. That said, Noosa is expensive for accom and it just sucks to get around Noosa Heads unless you're staying right there. Mooloolaba has lots of accom within easy walking distance of transition, the esplanade and the beach. I also find Mooloolaba has a more laid-back and relaxed feel to the weekend.
  10. Athlete tracker

    Yep, I had the same issue checking results.
  11. ageing- from serious stick insect to mammil

    Sorry, was posting via my phone and had some technical difficulties. I also meant to add... I think you're right. It's more than just a physiological issue, but can have psychological effects also. For a lot of Australian men identity is formed around things like work, sport, competition, etc. As we age and performance potentially decreases, many men can struggle with a perceived loss of identity. Same as for some who lose their job or retire, etc. Not to say this isn't the case for some/many women as well, but it is common in men, which may partly explain the number of guys posting about it in this thread. It may just reflect the nature of many who are involved in our sport and/or this forum, but I think it's great to see so many (men and women) sharing their experiences and approach to this issue, as well as those seeking advice and strategies to deal with the inevitable ageing process.
  12. ageing- from serious stick insect to mammil

    You beat ne to it
  13. ageing- from serious stick insect to mammil

    No offence taken at all. I'm normally much the same and just try to do whatever I can to feel like I'm at least doing something. This time it's a combination of doctor's orders and my own paranoia of not stuffing up the graft that I'm probably a bit conservative about it. The surgeon gave me a training ban for 6 weeks and minimal activity for the first couple of weeks. I'm out and about a bit more now and have been walking the dog etc, so maybe I overstated the couch potato bit but it sure feels that way compared to normal. My 'hair' is probably what gives away my age, as there is a steady hair evacuation program in place to avoid going grey.
  14. ageing- from serious stick insect to mammil

    Two great posts Ironpo. I completely agree. My sport/activity/training etc is just my lifestyle and what I've always done. I'm 44 but don't feel any different from when I was in my 20's and feel as though I could have a crack at pretty much anything. I'm just at the point where I'm thinking about doing some more strength training again as I think that's of benefit getting older, but from a tri perspective I'm probably as fit/fast as I've ever been (semi-serious MOPer). I know everyone has different interests etc, but there are a lot of people who just do no activity at all and they pay for it by looking (and probably feeling) much older than they are. This hits home a bit at the moment too as I'm completely out of action due to a skin graft on my arm. I've been sitting on the couch for the last 5 weeks with probably another couple to go without exercise. I went from 70.3 training load and getting ready for racing season, to being a couch potato. It's driving me nuts and I'm feeling very sluggish.... but this level of activity is how a lot of people spend their lives.
  15. Respecting the Race

    Definitely. It's a shame he went down the path of sooking and stamping his feet, as he had talent to burn.
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