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Evil Guru

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Everything posted by Evil Guru

  1. I think it demonstrates the importance of a good warmup. The other factor to consider is whether there is a variation in your cadence from straight run to running off the bike. Your cadence on the bike is probably > 90. Most probably your cadence on a straight run is 85 (170 steps per minute). The bike has set you up to run with a high cadence and your body will take a while to settle into its natural rhythm. I've always had trouble in the first 1-2km of a sprint tri race going out to fast. Very easy to run 30 seconds faster than you should be, its in the next 2 km that it then comes back and bites you.
  2. Evil Guru

    Target CTL

    There is so much that can be played around with and frankly it takes years to fully test how training impacts performance. Just looking at CTL for bike and run as an example. You may be a far better runner and mininimise injuries with a bike CTL of 50 and a run CTL of 30, vs 40:40 split, then again you might not be. Personally as an aging athlete (51), I know I can ride a lot and not get injured but I need to be really careful with my running and how quicly I build. So I can built Total CTL by adding a lot more biking than I can with adding it to running. Does it help performance, this is what needs to be understood and why it takes so long to develop peak performance when traiing 3 discplines.
  3. Evil Guru

    Target CTL

    I had a few other things to do, which included working in Cairo (probably not the best place to ride), travelling to London and then to Inverness to run the Loch Ness marathon, then recovering from that while organising a conference and working 14 hour days, before then flying home on Friday night and arriving on Sunday. (50 hours without any sleep). I'm back into it this week with my 4th ride starting in around 45 minutes.
  4. Evil Guru

    Heart Rate Zones

    An alternative is MAF pace runs, which put you in Zone 2. Look up Phil Maffetone running at MAF pace. Essentially you take your age from 180 to give you MAF pace, so in your case it'd be around 139 bpm. There is some adjustment for injury which reduces it by 2 bpm, or for a well trained athlete and you can add 2 bpm. At 51 it works pretty well for me with a MAF pace of around 131. I'd also suggest that it'd be useful having a clear idea of your threshold HR and pace so Melbourne 10km will be a good opportunity to start to understand this. You should be able to run at threshold for an hour. Obviously fatigue has a major influence. I ran a Marathon 10 days ago and also didn't sleep for over 50 hours from Friday to Sunday (long haul flight). Yesterday I hit a HR of 180 bpm running at 4'30" per km. Normally I'd be at around 155. This is the highest HR that I've hit for as long as I can remember.
  5. Evil Guru

    Target CTL

    Agreed and in my case. 20 years of riding and typically averaging over 9 rides per week over the past 6 months, although 8 of these are a 40 minute commute, with a long ride on the weekend. Very easy to have big TSS weeks with over 250km quite regularly.
  6. Evil Guru

    Target CTL

    Its a great planning tool if you are self coached. Building your CTL in a sensible way, looking at each discipline seperately and monitoring your daily TSB as you work out your plan is really useful for avoiding over training and being too fatigued to be useful at work or home. For instance if my combined TSB drops much below -28 I know I'm going to be quite tired, not great if I have a major project at work or going out with the wife for dinner. Once you've been using it for a while you'll work out what CTL works best for each discipline. For instance if my ride CTL is above 50 then I'll be well setup for a 70.3 ride, I'm in good half marathon form if my run CTL is greater than 35. A CTL of around 20 for swimming also means that I'll be comfortable over a 2 km swim. The biggest problem I have with TP at the moment is the speed at which my CTL drops when I'm travelling on 2 week work trips. My bike CTL dropped from 55 to 33 because I was unable to ride for the past 2 weeks. However, I'm not convinced this is accurate, its simply how the algorithm handles my score, If you want to save money and are mathmatically minded then you can build up an excel spreadsheet to map your own ATL, CTL and TSB. Its also a useful means of building up a program. TP basic will give you a training session TSS even if you are not a premium member. However, for the annual cost I find it easier to simply pay up and let it do the work.
  7. 10 hours is more than I'd normally train for a half. I'm jealous of your swim speed and I suspect 5 hours in good conditions wouldnt' be all that hard. Do it because you love it and because its fun and social. I've been doing this sport for 20 years and I'd much rather do less and have time to drink coffee with mates than hit a certain time. I don't know what your external social life is like, but if its anything like ours its damn near impossible to catch up with non sport related friends who have similiar age kids, we are all off doing a multitude of things. I tried to organise a catchup and we ended up some time in November. However, its the week to week training with mates (and the wife) and the occassional club social night that keeps me happy. Its also about being fit and well and having the energy to do things with the family. If you didn't do this you could certainly focus on a single sport and spend less time training, but I reckon I'd get bored and injured quickly.
  8. Depends on the regime. If its HFLC, then for me its about minimising the risk of insulin resistance, minimising inflammation and being able to enjoy most mid distance training sessions without having to suck down a lot of sports drinks of gels. I also enjoy whole foods and have discovered that I really don't need that many carbs and enjoy eliminating highly processed foods.
  9. Coconut oils and adverse health effects. Comprehensive study that ultimately was unable to determine whether increased cardio vascular risks were influenced by coconut oil intake. However in an n=1 study my cholestrol levels have always been far better than average and by eliminating large amounts of sugar I reduce my risk of diabetes which given a family history is of far greater risk than high cholestrol. There have also been a number of recent studies which start to debunk that high cholestrol actually is as bad as we once thought. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4892314/
  10. Butter in my coffee is my wakeup drink before training. It adds a few calories and the caffeine wakes me up but also leaves me in a mostly fasted state so my body doesn't immediately switch to burning glycogen and instead relies more on fat for energy. Its actually pretty good once you get used to it. Bit like butter on popcorn.
  11. Lots of whole foods. Chia, almond meal, grated coconut and coconut cream for breakfast, nuts for morning tea, meat, veggies for lunch and dinner. Plus butter in my coffee, also a fan of supporting Australia’s wine industry.
  12. Cadbury - I don't eat. Arnott’s I don't eat Heinz I don't eat Kellogg’s I don't eat Kraft I don't eat. Coca-Cola I don't eat Nescafé I don't eat Nestlé I don't eat Lindt - yes Sanitarium I don't eat Golden Circle I don't eat Bega Cheese - make some good cheeses SPC I don't eat Edgell I don't eat Uncle Tobys I don't eat Streets I don't eat Kleenex Vegemite I don't eat Dick Smith Foods I don't eat John West I don't eat
  13. If you are very low carb then you will be burning ketones and will notice the smell, straight after a session, but it goes away after a shower. If you smell like urine then you aren't eating enough fats and are burning protein which is bad. You'll also find after a long depleting run or ride that for a couple of days you'll smell of ketones when you train, its because your body is deprived of glycogen and burning ketones. The point people seem to be missing is that you don't burn 100% glycogen, you also burn a proportion of fat for fuel, the more fat adapted you can become the more fat you'll burn at different intensitities vs carbohydrates. Given that by nature triathlon is an endurance sport and you can't race at 100% then the more fat you can burn the longer you can go. Its impossible to replace all of the carbohydrates you burn with eating carbohydrates over an extended training session or event, however your body fat will literally last you days. I believe the trick to taking on a HFLC diet is to teach your body how to burn an alternative fuel, do it for a few months, once you've done this you can go back to eating more carbohydrates at selected times such as after intense or long sessions. They call it metabolic flexibility. When racing a longer event, if you can burn fat as a fuel and also supplement with gels etc you'll last longer than an athlete who isn't fat adapted and metabolic flexible. If you are racing for under 2 hours it probably doesn't matter, but in longer events it does. I'd like to see the evidence that high carbohydrate intake doesn't cause inflammation, I've found the reverse and recover far faster on a lower carb and higher fat diet. Its also worth googling insulin resistance, now with a family of diabetes that is scary.
  14. Isn't Epstein Barr the same as Glandular Fever? or at least the virus that presents as GF. I had it in around 2005 picked it up at Sydney City to Surf. Laid me flat for 5-6 weeks, it was quite amazing that at the end of it I came out of a mental haze. It then took me at least 12 months to recover to full capcacity. I started training lightly about 8 weeks after contracting it, but couldn't do any volume for about 12 months. I also noticed a significant shift in threshold HR. Depending on how your feeling an IM is probably not a great idea, as far as giving away triathlon, if you love it why would you give it away. You will recover but it'll take some time and you need to listen to your body. Every so often you'll do too much and then you'll spend the next day in bed.
  15. The Broken Marathon seems simliar to the Long Run down here in June. Essentially it's 7 Parkruns done on different courses throughout a single day. You run the first, drive to the next and repeat. Quite a few will run a couple of extra kms after each so as to clock up 42.2 km in the day. Getting going again is really tough.
  16. Using your garmin set to run pace, you can also use this for motivation on the climbs. I believe its all about maintaining good form and once that drops you are better off throwing in a short walk, form comes back really quick for me within 20 steps. Using Garmin run pace you can chase and maintain your pace, you just need to build up a buffer at the start of each lap/km. Who is TC? I'm really looking forward to giving LNM a crack, although the plan is to run it at training pace and then go for it at Melbourne 3 weeks later.
  17. Here is my suggestion and it usually works for me. On the uphills, walk run on a 20 to 80 step basis. That means maximum of 20 right leg steps walking and minimum of 80 right leg steps when running. Its easier than counting both legs. The walk breaks take the pressure off momentarily and give you a chance to run with reasonable form for the run portion. Try it sometime in training when your running next to a similiar level runner, you don't lose anytime as you'll accelerate every time you start to run and make up the difference. It also works well in heat. The trick is to religously count and never go longer than 20 walking steps. I'd then run the down hills, but being careful so as to not blow out my thighs. Doing some training on hills and learning to load your quads on the downhill will work well, Alternatively a couple of sessions where you get your missus to drive you up a mountain and you run back down. You'll be sore the next day but you'll build good resilience. I did a 35km long run yesterday, at 6 min/km average pace, basically chased the lap pace on my Garmin. First part of the km, built a buffer ie avg 5 min/km, then would walk till it got back to 6 min/km and then off again, if I recovered quick enough I'd start running earlier than this. Often my running portion would be less than 100 steps. I'm actually coming your way in a few weeks for work, discovered I had a weekend in London so instead I'm heading north up to Inverness to have a crack at the Loch Ness Marathon. Looks nasty with the intial 16km down hill and a solid 3 km climb at around 28 km.
  18. I"m not super low, but low carb for breakfast, lunch and dinner but have the occassional ie daily treat of chocolate and potatoe chips. However, never touch soft drink and for anything under two hours I won't use anything other than water. Currently training for my first marathon in 18 years and made it through a 3 hour treadmill run on mostly water and about 100 g carbohydrates. That was on Sunday, Monday was a little rough, easy run this morning and the legs are recovering pretty quickly. I've found one of the biggest advantages of LCHF is the minimal inflammation and faster recovery. I'm 51 in 5 weeks so should be taking longer to recover, however this diet seems to help. Although I've some how gone from having not run a marathon in 18 years to doing two in 3 weeks starting on the 23/9.
  19. Evil Guru

    Kona Slot Giveaway

    Everyone is making such a big deal out of the word "World Champs". Having raced the ITU World Standard distance championships last year, I'm happy to inform that there are plenty of non elite people racing for their countries. Sure the people who win are the best but there are a lot of others who just enjoy racing for their country with no thought of ever winning. It certainly doesn't mean that it can't be called World Championship as the people who win their age categories are crowned World Champions and deserve it.
  20. It works pretty well, its something that I do most days.
  21. There is a heap of stuff on the Fitter Radio Podcast, they've been doing it for about 4 years with very good results. Also go searching for Mikki Wiliden (https://mikkiwilliden.com/coaches) who has written lots of good stuff. If you are really serious you might want to hire her as your nutritionalist, she's pretty good and doesn't charge all that much. It'll help you avoid lots of the beginner mistakes, give it 3 months and you will no exactly what to do. Biggest lessons I learnt are: You'll feel like crap for about 1-2 weeks as your body craves carbohydrates. You need to add salt to your diet, a teaspoon in a bidon every morning works pretty well (reducing carbs also reduces salt intake, and you do need some salt - try himalayan) You need to ensure that you eat enough fat, a lot of people reduce carbs but are still too afraid to increase their fat levels enough, so your calories drop and you lose weight and have limited energy to train. Once you adapt, you'll find that you recover quicker from hard sessions, have less DOMS due to reduced inflammation as your generally burning a cleaner fuel. You can also get through longer sessions on just water and maybe some salt. Coconut cream becomes your friend and you add it to lots of things. A smoothy for breakfast with coconut cream, avocardo, a small amount of full cream milk and a handful of berries will keep you going for hours. Chia pudding is worth making, its a really easy breakfast and has really good fat, I usually add some berries and honey. Omlettes are also pretty good, add plenty of cheese to them, biggest challenge is getting enough fat into them to make them useful. Butter in your coffee, seems pretty weird at first, but once you get used to it, its a must before every morning session. There is a difference between LCHF and Ketogenic, you need to figure out what works for you. There doesn't seem to be too many rules around what is LCHF as far as carbohydrate content, however it typically seems less than 120 g per day. You'll usually know pretty quick if you are going ketogenic as you'll smell after a training session, its a pretty distinct odour. Its worth trying. I've been doing it for about 4 years although over the past 18 months I've relaxed and eat a few more carbs. However, by generally eating lower carb I seem to avoid the worst of DOMS and have reasonable endurance without having to eat too many carbs.
  22. Evil Guru

    Kona Slot Giveaway

    Now here is a far better story, although it's terribly tragic. I'm sure Leigh would rather never race (or even walk) again and still have his family. https://www.facebook.com/IRONMANAUS/videos/1071934472971950/?t=1
  23. I must admit I really liked his office! Its a shame they didn't follow up on Sister MB or give a bit more insight to her achievements.
  24. Evil Guru

    Training solo

    Well I train for the coffee afterwards and in the hope that at 50 I can keep on doing it for a few more years.
  25. Evil Guru

    Training solo

    Back to the original subject. Sorry technology related but paid subscription to Trainingpeaks. Fantastic motivator especially as you see your CTL either rise or fall, mine has just fallen by 30 after 3 weeks travelling in Europe with very little training. However, plotting out sessions for the next 6 weeks I can easily see how long it'll take me to get my CTL back. If you miss a few days you drop back pretty quickly. Of course you don't necessarily need the paidTrainingpeaks subscription as you can also build this into an Excel spreadsheet providing you are measuring HR and have some idea around run and swim threshold. There is a heap of information online at Trainingpeaks on how they caclulate CTL.
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