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Hi guys and gals. Looking for some advice on wheels and what to buy. I have just bought my first tri bike (P2) which came with the usual training wheels which I'm looking to replace.  

Do I keep the wheels to train on and buy race wheels? Are "race wheels" heavier but more aero? Disk?

Do I buy a compromise - lighter better aluminium wheel?

Do I go carbon? I've heard they brake badly in the wet? If I go carbon, would they be considered racing wheels or everyday use?

I would really appreciate some advice on this as I dont have a clue! So much to learn! Thanks!

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Quick someone mention Caden... 

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U can. It good wheels (carbon) and use them every day and for racing just put better faster tyres on 

they brake fine in the wet 

why have great wheels and hardly use them

u also don't have to buy new , there are some great zipp wheels out there for sale second hand 

 

disks are super cool , a must have if your into your tris  or even if your not and just want to be cool

 

disclAimer I have a disk wheel set for sale in tritrade 👌

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2 hours ago, Mishca said:

Hi guys and gals. Looking for some advice on wheels and what to buy. I have just bought my first tri bike (P2) which came with the usual training wheels which I'm looking to replace.  

Do I keep the wheels to train on and buy race wheels? Are "race wheels" heavier but more aero? Disk?

Do I buy a compromise - lighter better aluminium wheel?

Do I go carbon? I've heard they brake badly in the wet? If I go carbon, would they be considered racing wheels or everyday use?

I would really appreciate some advice on this as I dont have a clue! So much to learn! Thanks!

Train on heavy race on lighter wheels.

Remember it is about the training not the equipment.  Put in the correct training application then the better equipment puts icing on the cake.  Learn to ride better first

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I've been using Zipp404 Firecrest for about the last 5 years and they pretty much stay on the bike for training and racing. I used to change them for the computrainer/Kickr but am a bit lazy with it at the moment. Apart from being setup to run 11sp from 10sp they've been faultless and never really touched. I cant comment on other wheels, but Zipp you can definitely use for everything.

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Caden? Please explain? :huh:

Sorry, but I'm not interested in second hand as I really have no clue and could be sold a lemon/worn out wheels - I have no idea what to look for in practice...

Zipp - just looked at reviews. Looks interesting. Mentioned inertia as weight is on outer rim. Not an issue due to Trisha being flat and not start/stop?

Lew, is, em, out of my price range. Totally.

Looking at the Aero wheels, ie deeper rims, is there a speed where it becomes beneficial and a speed where there is no point? Just read an article spruiking benefits at 40km/hr. I'm not riding at that pace!

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Very little difference in performance between a $800 Renn disc and a $2500 Zipp disc. I had the former and it was great. I would opt for disc and 80mm+ front. Look at flo, renn, caden, fast forward new, Zipp 2nd hand. As you're fairly new to the sport, I wouldn't spend more than $1500. Check out the 2nd hand market, plenty of bargains about.

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Second hand zips are the go

great wheels

 very reliable , and fast wheels

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1 hour ago, ironpo said:

Second hand zips are the go

great wheels

 very reliable , and fast wheels

and IP just so happen to have some for sale....  :mellow:

Edited by pieman
mistake
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13 hours ago, Mishca said:

 

Looking at the Aero wheels, ie deeper rims, is there a speed where it becomes beneficial and a speed where there is no point? Just read an article spruiking benefits at 40km/hr. I'm not riding at that pace!

It's often mentioned that discs only becoming beneficial after 36km/hr or something, that's an urban myth, I think they are are beneficial from a very low speed i.e 20km/hr.

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25 minutes ago, pieman said:

and I just so happen to have some for sale....  :mellow:

What have you got pieman?

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Following. Going to get some Tri-specific race wheels soon. 

Like the look of the Cadens, though don't know much about rim depth. Unsure if I wanted to go the 81mm rim depth or a more conservative 59mm or even 49mm. Goal race is Sunny Coast 70.3

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11 minutes ago, dazmuzza said:

Following. Going to get some Tri-specific race wheels soon. 

Like the look of the Cadens, though don't know much about rim depth. Unsure if I wanted to go the 81mm rim depth or a more conservative 59mm or even 49mm. Goal race is Sunny Coast 70.3

A lot of people go too low with rim depth fearing they'll get blown about in strong winds with deeper dish rims, 1) it's never as bad as people think 2) when you do go a bit of movement in strong winds, you get used to it and learn how to ride in stronger winds.

Unless you're 45kg I'd suggest going as deep as possible and most definitely disc/wheel cover. 

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I commute on a set of 60mm Rovals - I tend not to have any real issue until crosswinds approach 45kph. Also race on them as well - they are a very capable and given they also commute, reliable. However some aero rims arent good in crosswinds, your kms may vary on that one.

The thing about carbon not braking well in the wet is 100% true however. Even Xentis - which are one of the best braking carbons - have problems with water.

Specialized show in their wind tunnel test that ALL aero wheels have benefits at lower speed. 40kph is a standard benchmark which is why you hear it quoted a lot but yes, any aero works at lower speeds.  Even at 25kph a disc wheel is still going to be a benefit.

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If you are new to the sport, I would just ride what you have. At some stage potentially go to a 60mm deep wheel. 

If you are new and not hugely technical and mechanical, then keep it simple with a AL brake track running clinchers. Then there is no need to change brake pads, adjust anything.

I would also keep the front and back the same depth at 60mm then you can put them on the road bike and look cool as well.

If you want to go fast there are other more cost effective thinks you can do: like helmet, clothing.

Buying second hand here of a crediable poster will give you piece of mind and network if something goes wrong.

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2 minutes ago, Cat Terrist said:

I commute on a set of 60mm Rovals - I tend not to have any real issue until crosswinds approach 45kph. 
 

Yeah that's when things start getting a little bit more interesting 45km/hr+, anything lower is normally fine.

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9 minutes ago, rory-dognz said:

If you are new to the sport, I would just ride what you have. At some stage potentially go to a 60mm deep wheel. 

If you are new and not hugely technical and mechanical, then keep it simple with a AL brake track running clinchers. Then there is no need to change brake pads, adjust anything.

I would also keep the front and back the same depth at 60mm then you can put them on the road bike and look cool as well.

If you want to go fast there are other more cost effective thinks you can do: like helmet, clothing.

Buying second hand here of a crediable poster will give you piece of mind and network if something goes wrong.

If you want to go fast there are other more cost effective thinks you can do: like helmet, clothing.

Even doing some training is beneficial as well.  Get your biomechanics better.  

Unless you addressing the physical component you really just wasting money.  Unless in the sport for the look

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Sure you don't need carbon race wheels, but they complete the look any tri bike. any if you can afford them why not?

I just got a set of Caden wheels, I'm really happy with them, but I've never had a set of zipps or more a more expense set.

Ben from Caden is really helpful in helping you choose what you want. I now keep my carbon wheels on all the time unless i'm on the trainer

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2 hours ago, zed said:

Yeah that's when things start getting a little bit more interesting 45km/hr+, anything lower is normally fine.

AT 45km/h+ average winds, it doesn't matter what depth you have, you will have... issues  (90mm wheels in 70+km/h gusts is... a sphincter clenching experience, but when you are on the tt bars, it doesn't matter what depth wheel you have, those gusts will make you pucker...)

But once you have dealt with the above, you can get away with nearly any kit (as long as you know there may be gusts and be ready for them.... something something constant vigilance...)

My road bike now only has one set of rims. - Reynolds Attack/Strike combo (40/60) - brakes nicely in the wet, not amazing, but not as bad as some, I don't think these are that wind affected. 

 

 

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What's your Triathlon History/ Biking History first!?!?

What events are u chasing? Short Distance? Long distance? 

Age group? Weight? Goals?

 

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Either buy a set of 606 zipp wheels or cadens.  Someone can post a link to Ben's site.

 

Or have a look for some second hand and get the people here with some experience to guide you in the right directions and help with what's good and what's not.

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If you are thinking of buying a disc wheel, consider buying a wheel cover and see how you go. There are a number of companies that make them. Mine is a Dyma.

http://dyma.calforsyth.com/index.html

If you haven't had a bike fit yet you should. It will make you more aero, more efficient and more comfortable. 

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Why will a bike fit make you more aero?  Mine sure as hell didn't but I feel like it's now set for me to run well off.

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57 minutes ago, RunBrettRun said:

Why will a bike fit make you more aero?  Mine sure as hell didn't but I feel like it's now set for me to run well off.

Yes

you don't look very "aero" at ALL , but u certainly run well off it 

"bike for show run for doe"

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