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Shimano Synchro Shifting. The ins and outs

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NEW SHIMANO DI2 BATTERY OFFERS SYNCHRONIZED SHIFTING POTENTIAL FOR ULTEGRA 6870 AND DURA ACE 9070 RIDERS

With the launch of Dura-Ace R9150 came new firmware offering road riders Synchronized Shifting options between front and rear derailleurs. Now this technology has been made available to Ultegra 6800 and Dura-Ace 9070 riders who have the latest Di2 battery.

The new battery (BT-DN110) contains a memory chip that can handle the processing power required to deal with the multiple shift patterns and customizations that Synchronized Shifting brings, offering you the choice to suit your gear positioning to your personal riding style.

How to access the new features: First ensure you have the new BT-DN110 battery, which is the only battery that allows you to take advantage of automated front shifts (ie full Synchronized Shift mode), or automated rear ‘correction shifts’ (ie semi-Synchronized Shift mode).

Next, if you are a current Di2 user with compatible front (FD-6870/FD-9070/FD-9150) or rear derailleurs (RD-6870/RD- 9070/RD-9150) you can download the latest E-TUBE firmware either by a cable connection to a PC, or via Bluetooth from your tablet or smart phone to your components.

Changing modes: If you have both the firmware and the new battery it is easy to tell which shifting mode you are in with a new sequencing of lights on your external SM-EW90A/B (pictured) or internal EW-RS910 junction box.

A double click of the external button allows you to toggle between modes.

• Solid red+green lights indicate Manual Shift mode

• 2 blinks indicates Full Synchronized Shift mode

• 3 blinks indicates Semi-Synchronized Shift mode

Synchro Shift 20160419 (1).jpg

 

Each mode is customisable in E-TUBE, meaning you can choose different combinations and customized shift patterns if you wish (for example, two semi-Synchronized Shift modes offering different ‘correction’ shifts, or two full Synchronized Shift modes that assign a front derailleur command on differing sprockets).

For more information: A helpful video explains the benefits of E-TUBE and the potential shift mapping options here: http://e-tubeproject.shimano.com/about/semisyncroshift.html

What is Synchronized Shifting? A function that allows riders to concentrate on only up or down shifting the rear derailleur while the Di2 system automatically picks the right gear combination from both the front and the rear derailleur. Even in Synchronized Shift mode riders still have full control over the front derailleur. Synchronized Shifting is designed to complement rather than replace manual shifting, and is especially useful when you are using auxiliary sprint, climbing or TT shifters, or, for Dura-Ace, the shifters on the top of the hoods.

With one press of the rear shifting lever, the function can achieve the optimal front/rear gear for your personal riding style. The E-TUBE PROJECT app or website can be used to pre-set exactly when changes take place.

What is Semi-Synchronized Shifting? Rather than automatically shifting the front derailleur, semi-Synchronized Shifting mode automatically shifts the rear derailleur when the front derailleur is shifted. This allows riders to obtain optimal gear transitions for smoother riding.

Again, the E-TUBE PROJECT app or website can be used to determine exactly when this change takes place. What is manual mode? Manual mode is the system all Dura-Ace Di2 and Ultegra Di2 riders had access to until this point. Manual mode provides an automatic trim adjustment on the front derailleur but there is no corresponding gear shift of the front derailleur based on the shift action of the rear derailleur, or vice versa.

 

Synchro Shift 20160419 (2).jpg

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seems like a perfectly rational development of the e shifting systems.

eventually, the whole transmission system will auto shift/adapt without rider involvement, other than pedalling & sweating etc

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25 minutes ago, AVAGO said:

seems like a perfectly rational development of the e shifting systems.

eventually, the whole transmission system will auto shift/adapt without rider involvement, other than pedalling & sweating etc

I don't sweat 

I sparkle 

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i wonder if i can hook it to the internal motor then it will be like riding an automatic.

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On 21/04/2017 at 3:41 PM, ironpo said:

I don't sweat 

I sparkle 

Mr Sparkle. 

 

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If ...  no. ...  when. I get back on the bike, this will be my first upgrade :)  (Battery).  

 

Amazing to think how crappy gear changing was before indexed systems.(late 80s). Keeping the front deurallier in one spot was challenging enough ie tension on the lever non slip etc. Best thing Shimano ever did (SID) and took them from a second level component manufacturer to king. 

 

Sid. Sb SIS

Edited by Mjainoz
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3 hours ago, Mjainoz said:

If ...  no. ...  when. I get back on the bike, this will be my first upgrade :)  (Battery).  

 

Amazing to think how crappy gear changing was before indexed systems.(late 80s). Keeping the front deurallier in one spot was challenging enough ie tension on the lever non slip etc. Best thing Shimano ever did (SID) and took them from a second level component manufacturer to king. 

I rode into the city last week on my old race bike, with friction shifters. No real issue, but I suppose it is easier, especially for beginners if they don't have to think about how far they move the shifter when they change.

The thing I like about friction shifters though is that I can swap between an 8, 9, or 10 speed cassette, and there's no issue.

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2 hours ago, Ex-Hasbeen said:

I rode into the city last week on my old race bike, with friction shifters. No real issue, but I suppose it is easier, especially for beginners if they don't have to think about how far they move the shifter when they change.

The thing I like about friction shifters though is that I can swap between an 8, 9, or 10 speed cassette, and there's no issue.

Sometimes I still move my knee out wide when changing gears. An instinct from many years ago when changing gears meant reaching down to the downtube to adjust the shifter.

Triathlon was much harder in the old days. :)

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17 hours ago, flathead said:

 

Triathlon was much harder in the old days. :)

Undoubtedly 

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20 hours ago, Ex-Hasbeen said:

I rode into the city last week on my old race bike, with friction shifters. No real issue, but I suppose it is easier, especially for beginners if they don't have to think about how far they move the shifter when they change.

The thing I like about friction shifters though is that I can swap between an 8, 9, or 10 speed cassette, and there's no issue.

What are these 8 9 or 10 speed things u speak of??

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11 hours ago, ironpo said:

What are these 8 9 or 10 speed things u speak of??

They're the new fangled ones that replaced the 6 & 7 I used to use on the bike when it was new. :) 

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2 minutes ago, Ex-Hasbeen said:

They're the new fangled ones that replaced the 6 & 7 I used to use on the bike when it was new. :) 

Re they di2?

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On 2017-4-24 at 10:49 AM, Ex-Hasbeen said:

I rode into the city last week on my old race bike, with friction shifters. No real issue, but I suppose it is easier, especially for beginners if they don't have to think about how far they move the shifter when they change.

The thing I like about friction shifters though is that I can swap between an 8, 9, or 10 speed cassette, and there's no issue.

I could never get it right.  Didn't matter what brand shifters I had. At some stage they'd shift and the simple tighten didn't work well for me over time.

Gotta say I'm getting lazy. The paddle shifters in my car steering wheel are awesome.  I hopped in a manual the other day. No gear shift patten on the gear knob.  Took me ages to find reverse !!  Oh the shame. .... to think driving a stick and or three on the tree was once ok...

Edited by Mjainoz

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I still drive a stick....

by choice

Edited by AVAGO
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14 hours ago, AVAGO said:

I still drive a stick....

by choice

I can't drive

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15 hours ago, AVAGO said:

I still drive a stick....

by choice

I tried to drive a stick but it wooden go.

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On 2017-4-27 at 4:44 AM, ironpo said:

I can't drive

That explains why you swim on your bathtub...  cant get to the "local" pool :)

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On 29/04/2017 at 10:20 PM, Mjainoz said:

That explains why you swim on your bathtub...  cant get to the "local" pool :)

Yep

and I'm too lazy to ride there 

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1 hour ago, ironpo said:

Yep

and I'm too lazy to ride there 

Do you drive your ride on mower between clients? 

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Back on topic does anyone know how this actually works? I've watched a video and all looks nice and dandy but if a computer is deciding the "most efficient" gear for me, how will it know what this most efficient gear is? For example I ride at a lower cadence than most, will this semi/auto shifting allow for me to continue that or is it always going to shift up on me because it thinks that's not the most efficient gear?

I'm interested in the tech but not sure I understand the principle?

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5 minutes ago, Rog said:

Back on topic does anyone know how this actually works? I've watched a video and all looks nice and dandy but if a computer is deciding the "most efficient" gear for me, how will it know what this most efficient gear is? For example I ride at a lower cadence than most, will this semi/auto shifting allow for me to continue that or is it always going to shift up on me because it thinks that's not the most efficient gear?

I'm interested in the tech but not sure I understand the principle?

I think the principal is that it allows changes from one ratio to next closest ratio combo

eg if I'm in 17 x39 and I change to an harder gear then the next best ratio might be 53 - 21 so the FD changes to the big ring and the rear changes it to the 21 , instead of now if we are in the 17 and change to a harder gear we just get a one slot down the cassette on the RD 

this is the way I understand it , and could be and probably is completely wrong

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Rog, it doesn't change gears for you or change gears by itself.

All it does is find the best chainline for your requested gear, and allows you to effectively have smooth access to more of your gears. 

In reality what it does best is work out for you that indecisive bit when you are in the big ring and start climbing and are not sure when to drop to the small ring as you know it will be a big "drop" and then you may have to drop the front and shift the rear to try and get a smooth transition. This does all that for you. 

 

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so what may happen if say, your pedalling a steady cadence uphill and then stand for a while.

normally I'd just click up a couple of gears....

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1 minute ago, AVAGO said:

so what may happen if say, your pedalling a steady cadence uphill and then stand for a while.

normally I'd just click up a couple of gears....

The same, just click up a couple of gears it will work out the next closest ratio and shift accordingly, same when you come back down. 

 

In essence if you are a gun cyclist and know your gear ratios back to front and have a superbly tuned bike this will probably make no difference.

If you are a novice cyclist, or too lazy to think your way through all your ratios this will (could) effectively give you access to more gears. 

This will be great for the relatively fast run into the bottom of MFD at Port where many go into it in the big ring, leave shifting  too late try and dump a handful of gears in a hurry front and back and drop the chain. 

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