beginnergirl

Torn Achilles

19 posts in this topic

.. 7 weeks ago I tore my Achilles, full rupture. After talking to the masses I opted for the non-surgical repair.

Its progressing well... I'm walking in my boot unaided and have removed 3cm of wedges.

Interested to hear from anyone that's been through the same thing. I've grown fond of my boot and the thought of taking it off next week to sleep and start walking gives me heart palpitations! 

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How the heck does a fully torn Achilles repair without surgery? I mean, the pieces don't meet anymore do they?

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My worst nightmare. 

How did you tear it and was it unbelievably painful?

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Sympathies Beginnergirl. I heard one snap on a touch football field one day and still have nightmares over the look on that guys face. He also went the non-surgical path. From memory his timeline was similar, with about 2 months before he started weaning himself off it, and 3 months till he got rid of it for good.

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recent dealings with other surgery makes me think this option isn't that strange

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It's just, if it's completely ruptured, isn't it, like, in two pieces? The human body is friggin amazing, I'm just wondering how it is that it repairs something like that?  Sure, a tear or something I'd get.  But, aren't the parts, like, far away from each other now?

I'm in no way questioning it.  I'm just wondering how it works?

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13 minutes ago, goughy said:

It's just, if it's completely ruptured, isn't it, like, in two pieces? The human body is friggin amazing, I'm just wondering how it is that it repairs something like that?  Sure, a tear or something I'd get.  But, aren't the parts, like, far away from each other now?

I'm in no way questioning it.  I'm just wondering how it works?

The foot is flexed (down) and I assume the knee bent to take all tension of the calf/achilles so that the sections meet.

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Did it walking up the basketball court... thought I had been tackled! Was painful to say the least.. 2 weeks plastered in a "ballet pose".. foot pointed down and 6 weeks so far in a boot. The two parts of the Achilles produce collagen and supposedly mend together. My tear is quite high and clean. You have to be careful not to stretch the tendon too quickly. I've had 3cm of heel lifts in my boot that I've removed 1cm at a time over the past few weeks. 

I spoke with lots of physio's and elite athletes that have had the injury and you get a mixed view on surgery/non-surgery.

The medical folk seem to be 50/50.

Am hoping to be back walking by week 12 in a runner. I start rehab next week with a Physio and plan to spend some time on the AlterG (20-30% of my body weight) to start with.

This is  a pic of my calf after 2 weeks in plaster. Was shocked at the atrophy. 

 

IMG_8440.JPG

Edited by beginnergirl

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OK, so putting i very very basically - it's point the foot down and she'll be right mate ;)

I am in no way questioning the technique in any way what so ever, cause it obviously works or they wouldn't be trying it.  But I find it friggin amazing that that can work.  That the pieces even meet is incredible.  That they repair themselves I certainly believe.  As I said, the human body is a friggin incredible thing.

Hope the recovery goes as well and as smooth as it can! :)

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8 hours ago, beginnergirl said:

Did it walking up the basketball court... thought I had been tackled! Was painful to say the least.. 2 weeks plastered in a "ballet pose".. foot pointed down and 6 weeks so far in a boot. The two parts of the Achilles produce collagen and supposedly mend together. My tear is quite high and clean. You have to be careful not to stretch the tendon too quickly. I've had 3cm of heel lifts in my boot that I've removed 1cm at a time over the past few weeks. 

I spoke with lots of physio's and elite athletes that have had the injury and you get a mixed view on surgery/non-surgery.

The medical folk seem to be 50/50.

Am hoping to be back walking by week 12 in a runner. I start rehab next week with a Physio and plan to spend some time on the AlterG (20-30% of my body weight) to start with.

This is  a pic of my calf after 2 weeks in plaster. Was shocked at the atrophy. 

 

IMG_8440.JPG

Someone's been skipping leg day :D

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Goughy I was another one who couldn't understand how it would work so I did a bit of Google research. They only do it if the ends are reasonably close together anyway, brought closer by keeping the foot pointed. The tendon is surrounded by a sheath, so even when the tendon ruptures the sheath keeps everything basically in line. New material grows inside the sheath to form new tendon.

Very layman's terms but hopefully helpful.

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Good luck with your recovery. Atrophy always amazes me especially how quickly it occurs. I used an alterG, was just great to feel like I was running again. Just a tip for when you put the shorts on - make sure any seams,  creased fabric etc all sorted out before they pump in the air. Eewwww ouch !!!  😲

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43 minutes ago, surfer101 said:

Good luck with your recovery. Atrophy always amazes me especially how quickly it occurs. I used an alterG, was just great to feel like I was running again. Just a tip for when you put the shorts on - make sure any seams,  creased fabric etc all sorted out before they pump in the air. Eewwww ouch !!!  😲

I've spent last year running on it also..  doing a mid week long run. Yeah.. getting the shorts sorted out helps! :-)

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3 hours ago, goughy said:

OK, so putting i very very basically - it's point the foot down and she'll be right mate ;)

I am in no way questioning the technique in any way what so ever, cause it obviously works or they wouldn't be trying it.  But I find it friggin amazing that that can work.  That the pieces even meet is incredible.  That they repair themselves I certainly believe.  As I said, the human body is a friggin incredible thing.

Hope the recovery goes as well and as smooth as it can! :)

Thanks! Tough decision not having surgery.. but having traumatised myself looking on instagram at all of the scars and botched surgeries, I'm happy to go with no surgery.. especially when there no one telling me (based on my ultrasounds) that I 100% need an operation. 

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1 hour ago, surfer101 said:

 Atrophy always amazes me especially how quickly it occurs.

It's pretty freaky actually. When my knee was done I was walking the next day. Everything I was doing my left I was doing with my right. Yet kept listing size off my while right leg. Buggered me why it wasn't coming of my left as well, since they were both doing the same stuff.

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On 18/04/2017 at 10:18 PM, beginnergirl said:

Did it walking up the basketball court...

 

 

 

Did my second one reffing on a basketball court, took 2 steps back at slow pace and felt the twang.  For what it's worth, my second one apparantly was due to overcompensating for the tear 4 months prior on the other leg.  Going back slowly is the key it appears to ensure you don't do it again, or the other one.  Trust me if you are struggling with no running now, wait until you get told it's going to be double and a bit longer before you get to run again

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Will be interested to follow your progress, still a debate in the research (as you would have seen) about whether to treat these surgically or conservatively.  One of the surgeons who does a few in Melbourne is quite open about the lack of evidence that surgery is better and normally gives patients both options.

Slowly slowly with the rehab, lots of small steps on the pathway to 'normal' and it should do well.

It seems a bit illogical that you can rupture a big thick tendon like that with just walking but it's pretty common that they rupture with trivial activities e.g. pushing off quickly. There was some Scandinavian research that showed ~2/3rds of people who ruptured their achilles had ZERO pain prior but a significant amount (I think 90%) had some existing tendinopathy/tendinitis in their tendon.

Good luck!

 

 

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40 minutes ago, Aidan said:

It seems a bit illogical that you can rupture a big thick tendon like that with just walking but it's pretty common that they rupture with trivial activities e.g. pushing off quickly.

 
 

;-)

This.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4080593/

3 years of hell for my wife after heading back to the US to see family and given a dose of Levaquin (banned out here, but cousins like Cipro are available) for a sinus infection. And her body will never be the same as it was previously.

She was doing tendons like it was going out of fashion. Reaching up to put mugs in the cupboard, picking up the kids, first steps of a jog. It was totally absurd, and the physio's kept treating her problem by problem, but I was like 'wtf' this is not normal, surely these people can see you don't damage tendons as easily and frequently as this (they fray like electrical wire...and the drug rips all the magnesium and COQ10 from the cells).

Many people damaged within hours of starting a course of this shit. Ruptured AT's first steps out of bed the next morning very common. As, unfortunately, is suicide, going off the forum my wife was in.

Johnson & Johnson lost a class action over this drug. https://www.drugwatch.com/2016/01/26/jj-faces-800-m-levaquin-lawsuit/

A black-box-warning was put on the drug 1 month after my wife took it. But it's banned in OZ and NZ.

Low body fat types like athletes are particularly more vulnerable.

Avoid Fluroquinolones like the plague unless it's a last resort to save your life.

 

 

Edited by MJK

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On 19/04/2017 at 5:37 AM, -H- said:

Goughy I was another one who couldn't understand how it would work so I did a bit of Google research. They only do it if the ends are reasonably close together anyway, brought closer by keeping the foot pointed. The tendon is surrounded by a sheath, so even when the tendon ruptures the sheath keeps everything basically in line. New material grows inside the sheath to form new tendon.

Very layman's terms but hopefully helpful.

Quite amazing how the human body can repair itself like that. 

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