japay1

Any benefit from strength work/lifting

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Just wondering if anyone has actually gained any benefits from doing any form of strength work, ie. speed, injury prevention etc. I'm currently doing 2 sessions per week (full body), but am not sure if I will gain any triathlon benefits?

cheers

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The older you get the more benefit you will get from doing it earlier on.

 

In regards to triathlon if the exercises are specific to the sport than they will be of benefit.

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Doing multi sports omits so many muscle groups. The core muscles. Upper arms. The abdominals.

 

Cycling wont touch most of those. Nor will running.

 

I think it will help you. But take some advice from FB Fitness Buddy above. He;s a trainer and he or someone with specific knowledge could advise you more.

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I would say that it won't make you faster. It probably won't make you swim, ride or run better - only swimming, riding and running will do that.

Won't help prevent any injuries either as it's not likely to stop any impact injuries or overuse injuries. It could actually create more injuries if not done perfectly.

If you are on a serious weight lifting programme, it is likely to deliver you to your next swim, ride or run session with some kind of tiredness which will have a negative impact on that session.

 

In my experience, the correct mobility and core work helps with relaxation and posture. Makes you feel good. So if you have time and know what you're doing, do it. If you don't have time best to stick with swimming, riding and running.

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I would say that it won't make you faster. It probably won't make you swim, ride or run better - only swimming, riding and running will do that.

Won't help prevent any injuries either as it's not likely to stop any impact injuries or overuse injuries. It could actually create more injuries if not done perfectly.

If you are on a serious weight lifting programme, it is likely to deliver you to your next swim, ride or run session with some kind of tiredness which will have a negative impact on that session.

 

In my experience, the correct mobility and core work helps with relaxation and posture. Makes you feel good. So if you have time and know what you're doing, do it. If you don't have time best to stick with swimming, riding and running.

This

Plus it takes time away from swim ride running

 

I do two sessions of core work a week , and belive this helps me in all facets of life

Not just tricathalon

Cheers

Ivp

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I do 2 shorter sets of weights a week (they take about 20 mins if I hustle). I work with a PT who is also a triathlete and has the guidance of a level 2 performance coach.

 

Shoulders/arms - building strength in general, plus specific swim movement weights - cuban presses

Legs - strength and stabilisation - squats mostly

Back/Core - strength and stabilisation - ball work, deadlifts

 

I tend to finish those sessions off with a quick stint on the treadmill, speed interval work, usually set to 1% gradient at a minimum, so I still get my run time in, just less of it.

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You will feel more awesome.

 

I think the benefits are more long term health based than tri performance. Lots of imbalances from swimming and single plane leg wrok in tri running and riding too.

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I would say that it won't make you faster. It probably won't make you swim, ride or run better - only swimming, riding and running will do that.

Won't help prevent any injuries either as it's not likely to stop any impact injuries or overuse injuries.

Isn't core work strength work to some degree? If yes than how can it not help in injury prevention. Core exercises improve both balance and stability therefore assisting other muscle groups to hold form etc.

 

I've been using TRX 2-3 times a week for around 3 months and I tend to agree with others that I wouldn't drop a tri specific session for one but if time allows its an added advantage to have/use.

 

 

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

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I've always done core strength work.

 

Recently got this book out from our library "Triathlon Anatomy" by Mark Klion and Troy Jacobson.

 

What I really like about it - is that it illustrates what core exercises benefit what muscles for triathlon eg. Stability Ball Prayer Roll -- ..."help the triathlete outstretched on a tri bike in the aero position ride longer with greater comfort" -- loads of pictures highlighting the actual muscles used

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Strength training can easily done at home with just a few pieces of equipment.

Resistance Bands

Fit Ball/Stability Ball

Balance disc

Powerband.

 

Doing unilateral exercises is going to give you best bang for buck for sports performance.

 

Running- single leg calf raises in toe off position. This can be achieved by placing hands on wall so body is leaning forward opposite leg is in knee drive. Now contract glute and perform calf raise. The benefit is engaging the same muscles through the toe off. Build to 50 each leg

Single leg leg curl on stability ball - hamstring glute used adding stabilisation through pelvis. Start hands on floor progress to no hands.

Single leg quarter squat - one legged squat performed as a quarter movement with rear leg trailing behind. If you lack dorsi flexion place a thin book under heel. Start point hold a chair on the same leg using with one hand. Progressing is hands free.

Can post some bike and swim ones if interested.

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The older you get the more benefit you will get from doing it earlier on.

In regards to triathlon if the exercises are specific to the sport than they will be of benefit.

Agree with this.

Like it or not, the older you get, the more you should be doing some form of strength training.

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Agree with this.

Like it or not, the older you get, the more you should be doing some form of strength training.

Yes, if you lead a sedentary life. If you are spending a lot of your time in the pursuit of becoming a better triathlete, simply incorporate strength methods into your swimming, riding and running ie. Pull/paddles, big gears, hills.

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I think the benefits are more long term health based than tri performance. Lots of imbalances from swimming and single plane leg wrok in tri running and riding too.

 

I agree with this - I think it's more beneficial for long term general health rather than athletic performance. There seems to be a lot of effort put into having older folk doing weights to maintain bone strength as they age.

 

Weights has never been something I enjoyed so I don't do them - I'm more into core, stretch, yoga type strength. Having said that, I see no great harm in weights if that's what you want to do - as long as it's done properly. I'm not sure super heavy weights are a great thing except for the Bondi shirtless crew.

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No TC, no caveats like sedentary lifestyle etc, all types of lifestyle can benefit from strength training as a person gets older, especially past 40 years of age. Notice I said "strength training" and not weight training, which I think you fixate on as the interpretation of strength training.

Using paddles for strength training in swimming, big gear workouts on the bike or hill repeats for cycling and running all fit the bill as strength training. But as FB and AP have separately pointed out, you need some form of strength training as you get older.

The secret is for the individual to work out if they need to do some form of strength training. For example. A guy doing a manual labour job on the tools will have functional strength in his back and upper body so won't necessarily have to focus on that. But his core and legs may need some work. Alternatively, someone who works in an office will need to focus on more areas starting with their core.

The best thing for anyone who is not sure how to go about undertaking a strength program to compliment their triathlon training as they get older, is to ask their coach or a PT.

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Im working with a PT a couple of times a week at the moment and hes big into the trx stuff. I'm really noticing how functionally weak i seem to be considering i had hought i was keeping ok. Really brings your core into it

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No TC, no caveats like sedentary lifestyle etc, all types of lifestyle can benefit from strength training as a person gets older, especially past 40 years of age. Notice I said "strength training" and not weight training, which I think you fixate on as the interpretation of strength training.

Using paddles for strength training in swimming, big gear workouts on the bike or hill repeats for cycling and running all fit the bill as strength training. But as FB and AP have separately pointed out, you need some form of strength training as you get older.

The secret is for the individual to work out if they need to do some form of strength training. For example. A guy doing a manual labour job on the tools will have functional strength in his back and upper body so won't necessarily have to focus on that. But his core and legs may need some work. Alternatively, someone who works in an office will need to focus on more areas starting with their core.

The best thing for anyone who is not sure how to go about undertaking a strength program to compliment their triathlon training as they get older, is to ask their coach or a PT.

is your core activated while sbr?

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Yes, if you lead a sedentary life. If you are spending a lot of your time in the pursuit of becoming a better triathlete, simply incorporate strength methods into your swimming, riding and running ie. Pull/paddles, big gears, hills.

This sounds great in reality but unless you are perfectly balanced athlete even the pros are not then overloading the body through these methods can be costly. Yes sport specific strength is critical but you need to be able to apply it correctly. If you are overcompensating due to imbalance performing paddles,big gear or hill running you will generally end up injured.

 

As we are always interested in what the pros do I am pretty sure most of them do resistance training and conditioning to help them perform better.

The ones i am aware of are

Dave Scott -

Mark Allen

Mirinda Carfrae

Mel Hauschildt

Tim O'Donnell

Craig Alexander

Tim Van Berkel

Jan Frodeno

These are the ones I know.

 

Their workouts are tailored to their individual weaknesses.

 

So first you must identify the weaknesses and then apply exercises which are aimed at in order

1. Achieving activation

2. Applying stability

3. Applying strength/load

4. Applying dynamic movement

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Thanks FB - always thoughtful in your response. Just to point out, they are full time Pro's and can rest and train off any cycle they want (not a typical 7 day age grouper cycle), therefore, the risk of going into a SBR carrying fatigue from a gym session can be manages.

 

GM, a PT who can make you a better swim/bike/runner will be hard to find. Cheers

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As running is done one leg at time, with core activated as the platform for rotation, is this not a fine way to build specific strength/endurance in those muscles with specific activation.

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GM, a PT who can make you a better swim/bike/runner will be hard to find. Cheers

Finding a good PT is bullshit hard anyway. This is why I've always believed that someone who has gone to University and graduated with a degree such as human movement or exercise science is always going to be better than a PT who has done a 12 week course online. I know that this is going to cop some backlash from people on here but at the end of the day I would throw my money at someone that has spent 3+ years studying the ins and outs of the human body in relation to movement.

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Thanks FB - always thoughtful in your response. Just to point out, they are full time Pro's and can rest and train off any cycle they want (not a typical 7 day age grouper cycle), therefore, the risk of going into a SBR carrying fatigue from a gym session can be manages.

 

GM, a PT who can make you a better swim/bike/runner will be hard to find. Cheers

Thats where periodisation comes into play.

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Finding a good PT is bullshit hard anyway. This is why I've always believed that someone who has gone to University and graduated with a degree such as human movement or exercise science is always going to be better than a PT who has done a 12 week course online. I know that this is going to cop some backlash from people on here but at the end of the day I would throw my money at someone that has spent 3+ years studying the ins and outs of the human body in relation to movement.

 

Alex what a load shit. I know many university graduates in various professions who may have a piece a paper to say they know this and that but put into practice they are shit. Knowing anatomy from theory is fine but seeing, observing and understanding dysfunction and movement patterns is more relevant.

As I have said before I hate the PT industry as so many give it a bad name.

Can remember talking about going to physio for run analysis etc and achieving no results. They are uni educated but still failed for a few.

 

Not trying to blow my own trumpet but i dont have a uni degree and did online fitness course but also an intetnship for a sports development diploma which was all practical and yet I knew more than the head exercise scientists in some areas particularly running related.

I have learnt a lot more away from books and school etc by actually going through the process myself and understanding things from the physical aspect. Have used myself as a guinea pig numerous times.

 

In some instances a Uni degree is just a piece of paper saying you know something. The real experts who live, dream and passionate about what they do not just treat people as a money making scheme.

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